Poole hospital imposes visiting times restriction after confirmed case of norovirus

Bournemouth Echo: CASE: Denise Richards with the hospital’s new BDMax machine which can identify norovirus in four hours CASE: Denise Richards with the hospital’s new BDMax machine which can identify norovirus in four hours

POOLE Hospital has enforced restricted visiting to one of its wards this week following a confirmed case of norovirus, the vomiting bug which swept across the country last winter affecting more than one million people.

Denise Richards, matron for infection control at Poole, said it is part of their proactive and precautionary stance towards managing the most infectious of all the viruses.

“Nothing spreads as quickly as noro,” she said.

Trying to prevent an outbreak is a 24/7 job for the hospital’s virology centre, which deals with viruses from across the region.

Early diagnosis is the key to staying one step ahead and the department now has a new weapon in its war on noro. She said: “If you suspect it, then you manage it as though it is, but until you get that confirmation, you don’t know if you are wasting lot of time needlessly.

“The BDMax machine gives you an accurate diagnosis within four hours, whereas before we had to wait up to a week.”

Surveillance is also very important. Denise explained: “We work closely with public health laboratories and local GP practices.

“At this time of year we get a weekly update of how many people have been to GP surgeries with diarrhoea and vomiting.

“Although there is still a peak in winter, there is some evidence that it likes drier, colder and wetter weather or it could be people tend to get together at this time of year, which is a great opportunity to share all the bugs.”

Denise said she managed to avoid it last winter, even though her husband and daughter both succumbed.

“I went to great lengths to avoid it.

“You literally have to think that every surface that has been touched is now contaminated.

“The key is never to put your fingers in your mouth without washing your hands first.”

But Denise added: “We live with these organisms – the world is full of them – and short of never leaving your home and never letting anyone in you can’t always avoid them.

“But homes and hospitals are two very different places.

“The only way to cease an outbreak in hospital is to stop admitting people to the area and allow time for everyone to recover before you can carry out a deep clean and start again.

“Everyone admitted is asked the same two questions – have you had any diarrhoea or vomiting in the last 72 hours and has anyone in your home had it.

“There’s a huge amount of work that goes on all year to manage a virus that is genetically predisposed to get the better of us.”

WAYS TO HELP HOSPITAL

Do not visit if you are unwell, particularly if you have had diarrhoea or vomiting within last 72 hours.
If you are unsure, make sure to ring the hospital beforehand.


Clean your hands when entering and leaving wards. The virus is usually mild, and people generally recover within two to three days.


However, it can have a much more serious affect on vulnerable hospital patients


If you have had norovirus, you will remain contagious for up to 72 hours, and in some cases even longer.


Always wash your hands well with soap and water after using the toilet.

Comments (11)

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6:52am Mon 23 Dec 13

BIGTONE says...

Again?
How come it's always Brit hospitals have this problem?
We Brits must be skanky.
Again? How come it's always Brit hospitals have this problem? We Brits must be skanky. BIGTONE

8:21am Mon 23 Dec 13

poolequarter says...

All very interesting BUT which ward is affected? Come on Echo ... you could do better!!!
All very interesting BUT which ward is affected? Come on Echo ... you could do better!!! poolequarter

9:16am Mon 23 Dec 13

Hessenford says...

BIGTONE wrote:
Again?
How come it's always Brit hospitals have this problem?
We Brits must be skanky.
Probably because their infection control procedures are not as stringent as other countries.
[quote][p][bold]BIGTONE[/bold] wrote: Again? How come it's always Brit hospitals have this problem? We Brits must be skanky.[/p][/quote]Probably because their infection control procedures are not as stringent as other countries. Hessenford

9:41am Mon 23 Dec 13

BarrHumbug says...

Although there is still a peak in winter, there is some evidence that it likes drier, colder and wetter weather or it could be people tend to get together at this time of year, which is a great opportunity to share all the bugs.

So basically then you have no idea?

Steer clear of the left overs buffet's on boxing day, thats my tip
Although there is still a peak in winter, there is some evidence that it likes drier, colder and wetter weather or it could be people tend to get together at this time of year, which is a great opportunity to share all the bugs. So basically then you have no idea? Steer clear of the left overs buffet's on boxing day, thats my tip BarrHumbug

10:02am Mon 23 Dec 13

BIGTONE says...

Hessenford wrote:
BIGTONE wrote:
Again?
How come it's always Brit hospitals have this problem?
We Brits must be skanky.
Probably because their infection control procedures are not as stringent as other countries.
That's exactly why they get European cleaners .in to show us how to do it properly.
[quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BIGTONE[/bold] wrote: Again? How come it's always Brit hospitals have this problem? We Brits must be skanky.[/p][/quote]Probably because their infection control procedures are not as stringent as other countries.[/p][/quote]That's exactly why they get European cleaners .in to show us how to do it properly. BIGTONE

11:36am Mon 23 Dec 13

Hessenford says...

BIGTONE wrote:
Hessenford wrote:
BIGTONE wrote:
Again?
How come it's always Brit hospitals have this problem?
We Brits must be skanky.
Probably because their infection control procedures are not as stringent as other countries.
That's exactly why they get European cleaners .in to show us how to do it properly.
Cleanliness is only part of prevention, controlling the way patients are moved around hospitals when infectious is another.
[quote][p][bold]BIGTONE[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BIGTONE[/bold] wrote: Again? How come it's always Brit hospitals have this problem? We Brits must be skanky.[/p][/quote]Probably because their infection control procedures are not as stringent as other countries.[/p][/quote]That's exactly why they get European cleaners .in to show us how to do it properly.[/p][/quote]Cleanliness is only part of prevention, controlling the way patients are moved around hospitals when infectious is another. Hessenford

12:33pm Mon 23 Dec 13

elaine191261 says...

BIGTONE wrote:
Hessenford wrote:
BIGTONE wrote:
Again?
How come it's always Brit hospitals have this problem?
We Brits must be skanky.
Probably because their infection control procedures are not as stringent as other countries.
That's exactly why they get European cleaners .in to show us how to do it properly.
So if we get European cleaners why is it NOW that we seem to get a lot of this now and not years ago ??? Think about it !!
[quote][p][bold]BIGTONE[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BIGTONE[/bold] wrote: Again? How come it's always Brit hospitals have this problem? We Brits must be skanky.[/p][/quote]Probably because their infection control procedures are not as stringent as other countries.[/p][/quote]That's exactly why they get European cleaners .in to show us how to do it properly.[/p][/quote]So if we get European cleaners why is it NOW that we seem to get a lot of this now and not years ago ??? Think about it !! elaine191261

1:12pm Mon 23 Dec 13

60plus says...

It's always the visitors that take infections into hospital,they should have named the ward,the staff are to busy to be answering the phones,
It's always the visitors that take infections into hospital,they should have named the ward,the staff are to busy to be answering the phones, 60plus

2:33pm Mon 23 Dec 13

Hessenford says...

60plus wrote:
It's always the visitors that take infections into hospital,they should have named the ward,the staff are to busy to be answering the phones,
Not just visitors, inpatients sometimes bring it in with them, pointless naming the ward as patients are transferred all over the hospital and that's where it spreads so quickly, the emphasis on washing hands only helps a little as this virus is airborne, hospitals should isolate completely any patient who has Norovirus and stop all visiting in that particular ward.
[quote][p][bold]60plus[/bold] wrote: It's always the visitors that take infections into hospital,they should have named the ward,the staff are to busy to be answering the phones,[/p][/quote]Not just visitors, inpatients sometimes bring it in with them, pointless naming the ward as patients are transferred all over the hospital and that's where it spreads so quickly, the emphasis on washing hands only helps a little as this virus is airborne, hospitals should isolate completely any patient who has Norovirus and stop all visiting in that particular ward. Hessenford

4:48pm Mon 23 Dec 13

BIGTONE says...

elaine191261 wrote:
BIGTONE wrote:
Hessenford wrote:
BIGTONE wrote:
Again?
How come it's always Brit hospitals have this problem?
We Brits must be skanky.
Probably because their infection control procedures are not as stringent as other countries.
That's exactly why they get European cleaners .in to show us how to do it properly.
So if we get European cleaners why is it NOW that we seem to get a lot of this now and not years ago ??? Think about it !!
Because the Brits are getting fatter,bone idle and skankier.

It's going to be so funny when the Albanians and Bosnians arrive.
[quote][p][bold]elaine191261[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BIGTONE[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BIGTONE[/bold] wrote: Again? How come it's always Brit hospitals have this problem? We Brits must be skanky.[/p][/quote]Probably because their infection control procedures are not as stringent as other countries.[/p][/quote]That's exactly why they get European cleaners .in to show us how to do it properly.[/p][/quote]So if we get European cleaners why is it NOW that we seem to get a lot of this now and not years ago ??? Think about it !![/p][/quote]Because the Brits are getting fatter,bone idle and skankier. It's going to be so funny when the Albanians and Bosnians arrive. BIGTONE

7:15pm Mon 23 Dec 13

spooki says...

Whenever I'd been 'lucky' enough to visit Bournemouth hospital, or actually anywhere, it's incredible how many people do not wash their hands when they've been to the public toilets.
I always do after using the toilets yet my clean hands have to touch handles after the grubby ones!
Being in hospital anytime isn't great but to be stuck in hospital over Christmas must be miserable. Being stuck without visitors must be really lonely.
Whenever I'd been 'lucky' enough to visit Bournemouth hospital, or actually anywhere, it's incredible how many people do not wash their hands when they've been to the public toilets. I always do after using the toilets yet my clean hands have to touch handles after the grubby ones! Being in hospital anytime isn't great but to be stuck in hospital over Christmas must be miserable. Being stuck without visitors must be really lonely. spooki

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