Highcliffe family takes drastic decision to live apart because children attend different schools

Bournemouth Echo: Jane Harding with daughters Katie and Gemma Jane Harding with daughters Katie and Gemma

A MOTHER has taken the drastic decision to split up her family because of the stress of having her two children at different schools.

After six months of seeing her six-year-old daughter taken to and from school by taxi, Jane Harding is leaving Highcliffe and taking her children back to their former home town in Kent.

They have made the difficult decision to live apart from her husband Greg, a marine engineer, who works in Dorset.

Jane, who works as a nurse, said she could no longer cope with the stress of having children in schools miles apart.

When the family moved to Highcliffe last October for Greg’s work, 10-year-old daughter Katie was given a Year 6 place at New Milton Junior School – 3.5miles to the east of their home – while Gemma was given a Year 2 place at Burton Primary School – more than four miles west.

As Jane was not physically able to get both children to their different schools, Dorset County Council said it would provide a taxi for Gemma. Staff said they could not provide this service for the older child because she was attending a school in Hampshire.

But the arrangement has been fraught with problems. Jane said Gemma hated going in the taxi and became withdrawn. She was also returned home by taxi before her mother could dash back from New Milton Junior School, which meant she was left sitting with a stranger waiting for her mother to return.

“Naively I had hoped to get them in the same school but they said that was impossible,” said Jane. “That’s fine, I understand that but I never thought I would have to put my six-year-old in a taxi when she doesn’t know the area and is going to a completely new school.”

• We try our best

A Dorset County Council spokesman said they could not comment on individual cases but provided this statement: “As part of our admissions code, we have an in-year transfer policy for children who either move school during a school year or do not apply for a school place in time.

“By law we are not allowed to hold places at a school for possible in-year transfer applicants and, although parents may express a preference, there is no guarantee that a place at their preferred, or indeed their catchment, school will be available.

“When we are unable to place a child at their preferred or catchment school, alternative offers are made based on other preferences the family may have made or another appropriate school.

“If the catchment or the nearest alternative school with places is over two miles away from their home and the child is in reception to Year 4, then the county council is responsible for providing transport.

This may be a pass for a public bus service, a seat on a school bus or a dedicated taxi service. The type of transport offered is based on the location and best value for the council.

“We always try our best to place children together but in areas where there are pressures on school places, such as Christchurch, this is not always possible.”

Comments (40)

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6:36am Wed 30 Apr 14

Morrigan says...

If as the council claim they "did their best", it is obviously not GOOD ENOUGH!

I know someone who lives within yards of a school, yet could not get her child into it because there are so many kids from out of the area wanting to go there and filling up the available spaces. Her child now goes in a council paid for taxi to a school more than five miles away! Ridiculous!

It is high time ALL schools were improved, so we don't have the system we have now, where parents clamour to send their children to a "decent" school out of their own area - ALL children deserve a decent education - meaning ALL the schools should be providing one, not just one or two!!
If as the council claim they "did their best", it is obviously not GOOD ENOUGH! I know someone who lives within yards of a school, yet could not get her child into it because there are so many kids from out of the area wanting to go there and filling up the available spaces. Her child now goes in a council paid for taxi to a school more than five miles away! Ridiculous! It is high time ALL schools were improved, so we don't have the system we have now, where parents clamour to send their children to a "decent" school out of their own area - ALL children deserve a decent education - meaning ALL the schools should be providing one, not just one or two!! Morrigan
  • Score: 65

6:53am Wed 30 Apr 14

High Treason says...

All children should go to the nearest school. This would save parents stress, save wasted car journeys, reduce road congestion, save tax payers money on buses and taxis. It is only a few schools that are not up to standard and these can be put right.
All children should go to the nearest school. This would save parents stress, save wasted car journeys, reduce road congestion, save tax payers money on buses and taxis. It is only a few schools that are not up to standard and these can be put right. High Treason
  • Score: 81

7:21am Wed 30 Apr 14

Baysider says...

Morrigan wrote:
If as the council claim they "did their best", it is obviously not GOOD ENOUGH!

I know someone who lives within yards of a school, yet could not get her child into it because there are so many kids from out of the area wanting to go there and filling up the available spaces. Her child now goes in a council paid for taxi to a school more than five miles away! Ridiculous!

It is high time ALL schools were improved, so we don't have the system we have now, where parents clamour to send their children to a "decent" school out of their own area - ALL children deserve a decent education - meaning ALL the schools should be providing one, not just one or two!!
Rant, rant, rant!

Perhaps, before this couple moved they should have checked out the school situation before deciding where they were going to live? The council have done more than enough to help in providing transport to assist with a situation where the only alternative would be to throw a child out of the school to open up a space for someone who moved there after the year started.
[quote][p][bold]Morrigan[/bold] wrote: If as the council claim they "did their best", it is obviously not GOOD ENOUGH! I know someone who lives within yards of a school, yet could not get her child into it because there are so many kids from out of the area wanting to go there and filling up the available spaces. Her child now goes in a council paid for taxi to a school more than five miles away! Ridiculous! It is high time ALL schools were improved, so we don't have the system we have now, where parents clamour to send their children to a "decent" school out of their own area - ALL children deserve a decent education - meaning ALL the schools should be providing one, not just one or two!![/p][/quote]Rant, rant, rant! Perhaps, before this couple moved they should have checked out the school situation before deciding where they were going to live? The council have done more than enough to help in providing transport to assist with a situation where the only alternative would be to throw a child out of the school to open up a space for someone who moved there after the year started. Baysider
  • Score: 40

8:39am Wed 30 Apr 14

Carolyn43 says...

High Treason wrote:
All children should go to the nearest school. This would save parents stress, save wasted car journeys, reduce road congestion, save tax payers money on buses and taxis. It is only a few schools that are not up to standard and these can be put right.
That's how it always used to be. Parents had no choice on which their child went to school - it was the one whose catchment area you lived in. Why is it different now?
[quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: All children should go to the nearest school. This would save parents stress, save wasted car journeys, reduce road congestion, save tax payers money on buses and taxis. It is only a few schools that are not up to standard and these can be put right.[/p][/quote]That's how it always used to be. Parents had no choice on which their child went to school - it was the one whose catchment area you lived in. Why is it different now? Carolyn43
  • Score: 39

8:57am Wed 30 Apr 14

Lucy28 says...

It doesn't say in this article whether there are places for the older child at Burton primary or where the older child has a place for next September when she starts secondary school And how she is going to get there. It isn't unreasonable for a year 7 child to take public transport to school or to walk.My August born very shy 11 year old does it she hasn't a choice . I actually can't believe that the only option is to seperate her family especially as in September the younger child moves into year 3 where the grounds for appeal open up to include everything including the taxi situation, the fact the school she Attends is out of the county etc etc and the stress it's putting the family under. The family could reapply for the younger child to attend the school the older child attends in June for a year 3 September start and appeal for a year 3 place.

Obviously in an ideal world children would go to their nearest school and that would be their preferred school but it doesn't work like that sometimes. I can imagine its a complete pain in the bum but I would not split my family up over it
It doesn't say in this article whether there are places for the older child at Burton primary or where the older child has a place for next September when she starts secondary school And how she is going to get there. It isn't unreasonable for a year 7 child to take public transport to school or to walk.My August born very shy 11 year old does it she hasn't a choice . I actually can't believe that the only option is to seperate her family especially as in September the younger child moves into year 3 where the grounds for appeal open up to include everything including the taxi situation, the fact the school she Attends is out of the county etc etc and the stress it's putting the family under. The family could reapply for the younger child to attend the school the older child attends in June for a year 3 September start and appeal for a year 3 place. Obviously in an ideal world children would go to their nearest school and that would be their preferred school but it doesn't work like that sometimes. I can imagine its a complete pain in the bum but I would not split my family up over it Lucy28
  • Score: 26

8:57am Wed 30 Apr 14

KitKatPuss says...

I'm sorry....taxis to school? I used to walk 3 miles to school and 3 miles back every day...Monday to Friday...it was never a hassle....when I was a child I was allocated to a school and my parents had to lump it (so to speak).

I understand that child has become withdrawn having to get a taxi to school and doesn't travel in with her class mates.....however surely moving back to Kent and the children living without their male parent figure is going to be even more traumatic?

Cutting nose of to spite face really...sorry but no sympathy.
I'm sorry....taxis to school? I used to walk 3 miles to school and 3 miles back every day...Monday to Friday...it was never a hassle....when I was a child I was allocated to a school and my parents had to lump it (so to speak). I understand that child has become withdrawn having to get a taxi to school and doesn't travel in with her class mates.....however surely moving back to Kent and the children living without their male parent figure is going to be even more traumatic? Cutting nose of to spite face really...sorry but no sympathy. KitKatPuss
  • Score: 55

9:00am Wed 30 Apr 14

joetheman says...

why do people leave one area and expect to take priority over people who have lived here all there lives? the sooner they go the better, at least they will stop being a drain on our limited funds, another family after the sympathy vote,
why do people leave one area and expect to take priority over people who have lived here all there lives? the sooner they go the better, at least they will stop being a drain on our limited funds, another family after the sympathy vote, joetheman
  • Score: 44

9:02am Wed 30 Apr 14

woby_tide says...

Carolyn43 wrote:
High Treason wrote:
All children should go to the nearest school. This would save parents stress, save wasted car journeys, reduce road congestion, save tax payers money on buses and taxis. It is only a few schools that are not up to standard and these can be put right.
That's how it always used to be. Parents had no choice on which their child went to school - it was the one whose catchment area you lived in. Why is it different now?
Because religion and the religious schools don't like to follow rules. Council run schools start their criteria with location/catchment after fulfilling their statutory requirements for those in care or with SEN. The religious schools choose their own criteria hence why people living next door won't get a space unless they go along and fake an interest in religion. Great system.
[quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: All children should go to the nearest school. This would save parents stress, save wasted car journeys, reduce road congestion, save tax payers money on buses and taxis. It is only a few schools that are not up to standard and these can be put right.[/p][/quote]That's how it always used to be. Parents had no choice on which their child went to school - it was the one whose catchment area you lived in. Why is it different now?[/p][/quote]Because religion and the religious schools don't like to follow rules. Council run schools start their criteria with location/catchment after fulfilling their statutory requirements for those in care or with SEN. The religious schools choose their own criteria hence why people living next door won't get a space unless they go along and fake an interest in religion. Great system. woby_tide
  • Score: 14

9:07am Wed 30 Apr 14

High Treason says...

Carolyn43 wrote:
High Treason wrote:
All children should go to the nearest school. This would save parents stress, save wasted car journeys, reduce road congestion, save tax payers money on buses and taxis. It is only a few schools that are not up to standard and these can be put right.
That's how it always used to be. Parents had no choice on which their child went to school - it was the one whose catchment area you lived in. Why is it different now?
It is all part of the political con to gain votes. If a school is doing badly improve it, if the parents are not satisfied they should send their children to private schools.
[quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: All children should go to the nearest school. This would save parents stress, save wasted car journeys, reduce road congestion, save tax payers money on buses and taxis. It is only a few schools that are not up to standard and these can be put right.[/p][/quote]That's how it always used to be. Parents had no choice on which their child went to school - it was the one whose catchment area you lived in. Why is it different now?[/p][/quote]It is all part of the political con to gain votes. If a school is doing badly improve it, if the parents are not satisfied they should send their children to private schools. High Treason
  • Score: -9

9:19am Wed 30 Apr 14

Baysider says...

Morrigan wrote:
If as the council claim they "did their best", it is obviously not GOOD ENOUGH!

I know someone who lives within yards of a school, yet could not get her child into it because there are so many kids from out of the area wanting to go there and filling up the available spaces. Her child now goes in a council paid for taxi to a school more than five miles away! Ridiculous!

It is high time ALL schools were improved, so we don't have the system we have now, where parents clamour to send their children to a "decent" school out of their own area - ALL children deserve a decent education - meaning ALL the schools should be providing one, not just one or two!!
If it's not enough Morrigan perhaps you or one of your supporters could suggest what else the school/council could have done to assist with the problem?

It's Burton and Highcliffe we are talking about here btw it's not like there are dozens of alternatives available within walking distance of where they chose to move to. Not good for the kids and inconvenient for the parents but far from exceptional and plenty of others cope with the extra running around created without the council paying for taxis too.
[quote][p][bold]Morrigan[/bold] wrote: If as the council claim they "did their best", it is obviously not GOOD ENOUGH! I know someone who lives within yards of a school, yet could not get her child into it because there are so many kids from out of the area wanting to go there and filling up the available spaces. Her child now goes in a council paid for taxi to a school more than five miles away! Ridiculous! It is high time ALL schools were improved, so we don't have the system we have now, where parents clamour to send their children to a "decent" school out of their own area - ALL children deserve a decent education - meaning ALL the schools should be providing one, not just one or two!![/p][/quote]If it's not enough Morrigan perhaps you or one of your supporters could suggest what else the school/council could have done to assist with the problem? It's Burton and Highcliffe we are talking about here btw it's not like there are dozens of alternatives available within walking distance of where they chose to move to. Not good for the kids and inconvenient for the parents but far from exceptional and plenty of others cope with the extra running around created without the council paying for taxis too. Baysider
  • Score: 20

9:23am Wed 30 Apr 14

Bournemouth87 says...

She moved to the town half way through school term. You cannot expect schools to save places in case someone want to join half way through. She should be greatful they payed for a taxi for one daughter. If you do it for one everyone wants it therefore is not viable. Stop moaning and be greatful your children are in education!!!
She moved to the town half way through school term. You cannot expect schools to save places in case someone want to join half way through. She should be greatful they payed for a taxi for one daughter. If you do it for one everyone wants it therefore is not viable. Stop moaning and be greatful your children are in education!!! Bournemouth87
  • Score: 41

9:56am Wed 30 Apr 14

BarrHumbug says...

There are only 10 weeks left of the school term, could she not have applied as soon as they moved here to get the two into the same school for the start of the next school year in September, it would surely be in the schools board interest to do this to save on transport costs?

Seems a bit drastic to split the family up over a 10 week wait?
There are only 10 weeks left of the school term, could she not have applied as soon as they moved here to get the two into the same school for the start of the next school year in September, it would surely be in the schools board interest to do this to save on transport costs? Seems a bit drastic to split the family up over a 10 week wait? BarrHumbug
  • Score: 26

11:02am Wed 30 Apr 14

forest-dweller says...

How pathetic. 2 of my kids go to school 12 miles to the east of me, and the other goes to a special needs school 9 miles to the west (and like this woman's kid, has a taxi). I don't find it stressful, not do my kids. The disabled one loves his taxi ride. Maybe she should get the taxi to take her eldest rather than youngest.
How pathetic. 2 of my kids go to school 12 miles to the east of me, and the other goes to a special needs school 9 miles to the west (and like this woman's kid, has a taxi). I don't find it stressful, not do my kids. The disabled one loves his taxi ride. Maybe she should get the taxi to take her eldest rather than youngest. forest-dweller
  • Score: 20

11:25am Wed 30 Apr 14

trolley says...

Absolutely pathetic,i suggest this family gets a grip
Absolutely pathetic,i suggest this family gets a grip trolley
  • Score: 27

11:44am Wed 30 Apr 14

Hessenford says...

Baysider wrote:
Morrigan wrote:
If as the council claim they "did their best", it is obviously not GOOD ENOUGH!

I know someone who lives within yards of a school, yet could not get her child into it because there are so many kids from out of the area wanting to go there and filling up the available spaces. Her child now goes in a council paid for taxi to a school more than five miles away! Ridiculous!

It is high time ALL schools were improved, so we don't have the system we have now, where parents clamour to send their children to a "decent" school out of their own area - ALL children deserve a decent education - meaning ALL the schools should be providing one, not just one or two!!
Rant, rant, rant!

Perhaps, before this couple moved they should have checked out the school situation before deciding where they were going to live? The council have done more than enough to help in providing transport to assist with a situation where the only alternative would be to throw a child out of the school to open up a space for someone who moved there after the year started.
Never used to get this problem years ago when moving to a new area so obviously councils are not keeping up to speed by providing relevant places, it seems to be more cost effective to spend thousands on taxis rather than making schools larger for the increasing population.
[quote][p][bold]Baysider[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Morrigan[/bold] wrote: If as the council claim they "did their best", it is obviously not GOOD ENOUGH! I know someone who lives within yards of a school, yet could not get her child into it because there are so many kids from out of the area wanting to go there and filling up the available spaces. Her child now goes in a council paid for taxi to a school more than five miles away! Ridiculous! It is high time ALL schools were improved, so we don't have the system we have now, where parents clamour to send their children to a "decent" school out of their own area - ALL children deserve a decent education - meaning ALL the schools should be providing one, not just one or two!![/p][/quote]Rant, rant, rant! Perhaps, before this couple moved they should have checked out the school situation before deciding where they were going to live? The council have done more than enough to help in providing transport to assist with a situation where the only alternative would be to throw a child out of the school to open up a space for someone who moved there after the year started.[/p][/quote]Never used to get this problem years ago when moving to a new area so obviously councils are not keeping up to speed by providing relevant places, it seems to be more cost effective to spend thousands on taxis rather than making schools larger for the increasing population. Hessenford
  • Score: -4

11:46am Wed 30 Apr 14

Hessenford says...

KitKatPuss wrote:
I'm sorry....taxis to school? I used to walk 3 miles to school and 3 miles back every day...Monday to Friday...it was never a hassle....when I was a child I was allocated to a school and my parents had to lump it (so to speak).

I understand that child has become withdrawn having to get a taxi to school and doesn't travel in with her class mates.....however surely moving back to Kent and the children living without their male parent figure is going to be even more traumatic?

Cutting nose of to spite face really...sorry but no sympathy.
Perhaps there wasn't so many perverts walking the streets back then.
[quote][p][bold]KitKatPuss[/bold] wrote: I'm sorry....taxis to school? I used to walk 3 miles to school and 3 miles back every day...Monday to Friday...it was never a hassle....when I was a child I was allocated to a school and my parents had to lump it (so to speak). I understand that child has become withdrawn having to get a taxi to school and doesn't travel in with her class mates.....however surely moving back to Kent and the children living without their male parent figure is going to be even more traumatic? Cutting nose of to spite face really...sorry but no sympathy.[/p][/quote]Perhaps there wasn't so many perverts walking the streets back then. Hessenford
  • Score: -20

12:04pm Wed 30 Apr 14

Western Sunset says...

But anyway, the older daughter (Y6) would soon be moving up to secondary school in the coming academic year. So the children would be in two different schools from September irrespective of if the lady decided to stay in this area or move back to Kent.
But anyway, the older daughter (Y6) would soon be moving up to secondary school in the coming academic year. So the children would be in two different schools from September irrespective of if the lady decided to stay in this area or move back to Kent. Western Sunset
  • Score: 25

12:14pm Wed 30 Apr 14

Letcommonsenseprevail says...

I can't believe this story. We managed to bring up 3 kids, living in corfe mullen, all going to school in either Colehill, Southbourne or Poole. We never winged once. We just got on with it and the kids have all done very well. No stress, just hard work. Don't confuse the two.
I can't believe this story. We managed to bring up 3 kids, living in corfe mullen, all going to school in either Colehill, Southbourne or Poole. We never winged once. We just got on with it and the kids have all done very well. No stress, just hard work. Don't confuse the two. Letcommonsenseprevail
  • Score: 22

12:16pm Wed 30 Apr 14

rozmister says...

Hessenford wrote:
Baysider wrote:
Morrigan wrote:
If as the council claim they "did their best", it is obviously not GOOD ENOUGH!

I know someone who lives within yards of a school, yet could not get her child into it because there are so many kids from out of the area wanting to go there and filling up the available spaces. Her child now goes in a council paid for taxi to a school more than five miles away! Ridiculous!

It is high time ALL schools were improved, so we don't have the system we have now, where parents clamour to send their children to a "decent" school out of their own area - ALL children deserve a decent education - meaning ALL the schools should be providing one, not just one or two!!
Rant, rant, rant!

Perhaps, before this couple moved they should have checked out the school situation before deciding where they were going to live? The council have done more than enough to help in providing transport to assist with a situation where the only alternative would be to throw a child out of the school to open up a space for someone who moved there after the year started.
Never used to get this problem years ago when moving to a new area so obviously councils are not keeping up to speed by providing relevant places, it seems to be more cost effective to spend thousands on taxis rather than making schools larger for the increasing population.
It probably does work out cheaper to pay for a taxi rather than pay to build an extension on a school to provide additional capacity for 1 or 2 children. There's a limit for classroom sizes for under 7's too which would make it hard to just stick another child in midway through the year if they were at maximum capacity already.
[quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Baysider[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Morrigan[/bold] wrote: If as the council claim they "did their best", it is obviously not GOOD ENOUGH! I know someone who lives within yards of a school, yet could not get her child into it because there are so many kids from out of the area wanting to go there and filling up the available spaces. Her child now goes in a council paid for taxi to a school more than five miles away! Ridiculous! It is high time ALL schools were improved, so we don't have the system we have now, where parents clamour to send their children to a "decent" school out of their own area - ALL children deserve a decent education - meaning ALL the schools should be providing one, not just one or two!![/p][/quote]Rant, rant, rant! Perhaps, before this couple moved they should have checked out the school situation before deciding where they were going to live? The council have done more than enough to help in providing transport to assist with a situation where the only alternative would be to throw a child out of the school to open up a space for someone who moved there after the year started.[/p][/quote]Never used to get this problem years ago when moving to a new area so obviously councils are not keeping up to speed by providing relevant places, it seems to be more cost effective to spend thousands on taxis rather than making schools larger for the increasing population.[/p][/quote]It probably does work out cheaper to pay for a taxi rather than pay to build an extension on a school to provide additional capacity for 1 or 2 children. There's a limit for classroom sizes for under 7's too which would make it hard to just stick another child in midway through the year if they were at maximum capacity already. rozmister
  • Score: 8

12:41pm Wed 30 Apr 14

teri10 says...

KitKatPuss wrote:
I'm sorry....taxis to school? I used to walk 3 miles to school and 3 miles back every day...Monday to Friday...it was never a hassle....when I was a child I was allocated to a school and my parents had to lump it (so to speak).

I understand that child has become withdrawn having to get a taxi to school and doesn't travel in with her class mates.....however surely moving back to Kent and the children living without their male parent figure is going to be even more traumatic?

Cutting nose of to spite face really...sorry but no sympathy.
Hear hear, plus the fact that the 10 year old will surely be going to secondary school in September, so will be in a different school anyway. Anyone would think this family are the only one! I know a family who have 4 kids, who have to go to different schools & while they have struggled with it, they have got on with it, not gone crying to the local paper!
[quote][p][bold]KitKatPuss[/bold] wrote: I'm sorry....taxis to school? I used to walk 3 miles to school and 3 miles back every day...Monday to Friday...it was never a hassle....when I was a child I was allocated to a school and my parents had to lump it (so to speak). I understand that child has become withdrawn having to get a taxi to school and doesn't travel in with her class mates.....however surely moving back to Kent and the children living without their male parent figure is going to be even more traumatic? Cutting nose of to spite face really...sorry but no sympathy.[/p][/quote]Hear hear, plus the fact that the 10 year old will surely be going to secondary school in September, so will be in a different school anyway. Anyone would think this family are the only one! I know a family who have 4 kids, who have to go to different schools & while they have struggled with it, they have got on with it, not gone crying to the local paper! teri10
  • Score: 20

1:01pm Wed 30 Apr 14

Buzetti says...

Maybe replace the nasty taxi with a nice stretch limmo?

Taxi provided at tax payers expense? And still not good enough?

Remarkable!
Maybe replace the nasty taxi with a nice stretch limmo? Taxi provided at tax payers expense? And still not good enough? Remarkable! Buzetti
  • Score: 16

1:49pm Wed 30 Apr 14

Baysider says...

Hessenford wrote:
Baysider wrote:
Morrigan wrote:
If as the council claim they "did their best", it is obviously not GOOD ENOUGH!

I know someone who lives within yards of a school, yet could not get her child into it because there are so many kids from out of the area wanting to go there and filling up the available spaces. Her child now goes in a council paid for taxi to a school more than five miles away! Ridiculous!

It is high time ALL schools were improved, so we don't have the system we have now, where parents clamour to send their children to a "decent" school out of their own area - ALL children deserve a decent education - meaning ALL the schools should be providing one, not just one or two!!
Rant, rant, rant!

Perhaps, before this couple moved they should have checked out the school situation before deciding where they were going to live? The council have done more than enough to help in providing transport to assist with a situation where the only alternative would be to throw a child out of the school to open up a space for someone who moved there after the year started.
Never used to get this problem years ago when moving to a new area so obviously councils are not keeping up to speed by providing relevant places, it seems to be more cost effective to spend thousands on taxis rather than making schools larger for the increasing population.
How dare councils not keep up to speed by building ever increasingly large or additional schools! After all, local authorities budgets have been increasing 20, 30, 40% every year recently...oh no...hang on...they've been reduced by that amount at the same time the population is growing.

The only "obvious" thing is you can't wait to launch an anti-public sector tirade every chance you get regardless of the circumstances.
[quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Baysider[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Morrigan[/bold] wrote: If as the council claim they "did their best", it is obviously not GOOD ENOUGH! I know someone who lives within yards of a school, yet could not get her child into it because there are so many kids from out of the area wanting to go there and filling up the available spaces. Her child now goes in a council paid for taxi to a school more than five miles away! Ridiculous! It is high time ALL schools were improved, so we don't have the system we have now, where parents clamour to send their children to a "decent" school out of their own area - ALL children deserve a decent education - meaning ALL the schools should be providing one, not just one or two!![/p][/quote]Rant, rant, rant! Perhaps, before this couple moved they should have checked out the school situation before deciding where they were going to live? The council have done more than enough to help in providing transport to assist with a situation where the only alternative would be to throw a child out of the school to open up a space for someone who moved there after the year started.[/p][/quote]Never used to get this problem years ago when moving to a new area so obviously councils are not keeping up to speed by providing relevant places, it seems to be more cost effective to spend thousands on taxis rather than making schools larger for the increasing population.[/p][/quote]How dare councils not keep up to speed by building ever increasingly large or additional schools! After all, local authorities budgets have been increasing 20, 30, 40% every year recently...oh no...hang on...they've been reduced by that amount at the same time the population is growing. The only "obvious" thing is you can't wait to launch an anti-public sector tirade every chance you get regardless of the circumstances. Baysider
  • Score: 6

2:00pm Wed 30 Apr 14

JANE HARDING says...

I am not saying the council could have done more in the circumstances and limited school places in these circumstances and there are class size laws. However just wanted to Highlight that there are many many families with children at different schools out of there residential area with problematic transport issues and lack of available school places for KS1 children is and has been inadequate for some time which highlights poor planning and provision. In one class alone many parents struggle with juggling their children at separate schools. It is a big problem in the area and we are not isolated. When we moved to Highcliffe not out of choice but work redundancy there was only one school out of 22 nearest schools across dorset hampshire border with a yr2 place. So where does the next child go to? Also you can not underestimate the stress that this sort of situatin can place on a family> Not the school places but how the child reacts to be separated from sibling and not being able to be taken to school by parent when the older child is. My child is now at a supportive school and is able to be taken to school by a parent and has revrted back to the child I know! It is not easy being a parent and we make choices based on what we think is best for the child at the time!!.
I am not saying the council could have done more in the circumstances and limited school places in these circumstances and there are class size laws. However just wanted to Highlight that there are many many families with children at different schools out of there residential area with problematic transport issues and lack of available school places for KS1 children is and has been inadequate for some time which highlights poor planning and provision. In one class alone many parents struggle with juggling their children at separate schools. It is a big problem in the area and we are not isolated. When we moved to Highcliffe not out of choice but work redundancy there was only one school out of 22 nearest schools across dorset hampshire border with a yr2 place. So where does the next child go to? Also you can not underestimate the stress that this sort of situatin can place on a family> Not the school places but how the child reacts to be separated from sibling and not being able to be taken to school by parent when the older child is. My child is now at a supportive school and is able to be taken to school by a parent and has revrted back to the child I know! It is not easy being a parent and we make choices based on what we think is best for the child at the time!!. JANE HARDING
  • Score: -11

2:06pm Wed 30 Apr 14

speedy231278 says...

Does one not investigate schools for their children when considering moving home to find out what sort of situation they could end up in?
Does one not investigate schools for their children when considering moving home to find out what sort of situation they could end up in? speedy231278
  • Score: 6

2:15pm Wed 30 Apr 14

joetheman says...

So you made the wrong choice for your children,and you think splitting the family is the right choice, more to this then meets the eye methinks
So you made the wrong choice for your children,and you think splitting the family is the right choice, more to this then meets the eye methinks joetheman
  • Score: 8

2:17pm Wed 30 Apr 14

IYSWIM says...

Thanks for adding a update jane but surely there were other options,but I guess you considered them first,

Could your husband have moved with the family and commuted weekly?
Could you have found a childminder to do the school run so that the youngest wasn't with a stranger?
Where there any mums you could car share with for the older child or alternating with the youngest?
Could you move house into the hants catchment? So oldest had a taxi?
Seems very drastic when the school year is nearly over and your oldest will be moving schools again in September - is two changes better for her that his move with just 10 weeks to go?
Thanks for adding a update jane but surely there were other options,but I guess you considered them first, Could your husband have moved with the family and commuted weekly? Could you have found a childminder to do the school run so that the youngest wasn't with a stranger? Where there any mums you could car share with for the older child or alternating with the youngest? Could you move house into the hants catchment? So oldest had a taxi? Seems very drastic when the school year is nearly over and your oldest will be moving schools again in September - is two changes better for her that his move with just 10 weeks to go? IYSWIM
  • Score: 7

4:31pm Wed 30 Apr 14

new2it says...

There are a lot of unkind and unecessary comments here. I don't think she is complaining about the situation, in fact she fully appreciates it, she is simply highlighting the problem that is becoming all to common place these days. I'm sure the decision to move here in the first place wasn't taken lightly, maybe her husband would have been without a job had they not done so. The alternative would have been unemployment benefit, no doubt drawing more critical comments. It seem they are in a no win situation. As for walking to school, ridiculous suggestion.Yes, I used to walk a considerable distance to school, but would I let children as young as this walk 2-3 miles unacompanied with all the traffic, not to mention the undesirables that appear to be around? Most definitely not. People have short memories, it wasn't very long ago a young girl in the area was assaulted on her way home from school in the afternoon in a busy area, and the flack that her poor mother got for daring to allow her child to walk by herself was awful. She was made to feel like an inadequate bad parent. I'm sure this family's decision for Mum to move back home with her children has not been taken lightly either. They are obviously doing the best they can for their family and the situation they are in, it's a pity perhaps that a few more families don't show the same care and consideration, and that more people had a bit of understanding of their position. I hope things work out well for them.
There are a lot of unkind and unecessary comments here. I don't think she is complaining about the situation, in fact she fully appreciates it, she is simply highlighting the problem that is becoming all to common place these days. I'm sure the decision to move here in the first place wasn't taken lightly, maybe her husband would have been without a job had they not done so. The alternative would have been unemployment benefit, no doubt drawing more critical comments. It seem they are in a no win situation. As for walking to school, ridiculous suggestion.Yes, I used to walk a considerable distance to school, but would I let children as young as this walk 2-3 miles unacompanied with all the traffic, not to mention the undesirables that appear to be around? Most definitely not. People have short memories, it wasn't very long ago a young girl in the area was assaulted on her way home from school in the afternoon in a busy area, and the flack that her poor mother got for daring to allow her child to walk by herself was awful. She was made to feel like an inadequate bad parent. I'm sure this family's decision for Mum to move back home with her children has not been taken lightly either. They are obviously doing the best they can for their family and the situation they are in, it's a pity perhaps that a few more families don't show the same care and consideration, and that more people had a bit of understanding of their position. I hope things work out well for them. new2it
  • Score: 2

4:51pm Wed 30 Apr 14

new2it says...

JANE HARDING wrote:
I am not saying the council could have done more in the circumstances and limited school places in these circumstances and there are class size laws. However just wanted to Highlight that there are many many families with children at different schools out of there residential area with problematic transport issues and lack of available school places for KS1 children is and has been inadequate for some time which highlights poor planning and provision. In one class alone many parents struggle with juggling their children at separate schools. It is a big problem in the area and we are not isolated. When we moved to Highcliffe not out of choice but work redundancy there was only one school out of 22 nearest schools across dorset hampshire border with a yr2 place. So where does the next child go to? Also you can not underestimate the stress that this sort of situatin can place on a family> Not the school places but how the child reacts to be separated from sibling and not being able to be taken to school by parent when the older child is. My child is now at a supportive school and is able to be taken to school by a parent and has revrted back to the child I know! It is not easy being a parent and we make choices based on what we think is best for the child at the time!!.
I can't believe people are putting a thumbs down on this.
[quote][p][bold]JANE HARDING[/bold] wrote: I am not saying the council could have done more in the circumstances and limited school places in these circumstances and there are class size laws. However just wanted to Highlight that there are many many families with children at different schools out of there residential area with problematic transport issues and lack of available school places for KS1 children is and has been inadequate for some time which highlights poor planning and provision. In one class alone many parents struggle with juggling their children at separate schools. It is a big problem in the area and we are not isolated. When we moved to Highcliffe not out of choice but work redundancy there was only one school out of 22 nearest schools across dorset hampshire border with a yr2 place. So where does the next child go to? Also you can not underestimate the stress that this sort of situatin can place on a family> Not the school places but how the child reacts to be separated from sibling and not being able to be taken to school by parent when the older child is. My child is now at a supportive school and is able to be taken to school by a parent and has revrted back to the child I know! It is not easy being a parent and we make choices based on what we think is best for the child at the time!!.[/p][/quote]I can't believe people are putting a thumbs down on this. new2it
  • Score: -8

5:13pm Wed 30 Apr 14

ShuttleX says...

new2it wrote:
JANE HARDING wrote:
I am not saying the council could have done more in the circumstances and limited school places in these circumstances and there are class size laws. However just wanted to Highlight that there are many many families with children at different schools out of there residential area with problematic transport issues and lack of available school places for KS1 children is and has been inadequate for some time which highlights poor planning and provision. In one class alone many parents struggle with juggling their children at separate schools. It is a big problem in the area and we are not isolated. When we moved to Highcliffe not out of choice but work redundancy there was only one school out of 22 nearest schools across dorset hampshire border with a yr2 place. So where does the next child go to? Also you can not underestimate the stress that this sort of situatin can place on a family> Not the school places but how the child reacts to be separated from sibling and not being able to be taken to school by parent when the older child is. My child is now at a supportive school and is able to be taken to school by a parent and has revrted back to the child I know! It is not easy being a parent and we make choices based on what we think is best for the child at the time!!.
I can't believe people are putting a thumbs down on this.
Oh I wouldn't worry about thumbs up or down, they are meaningless. The lady did what she thought best for her children, nothing to do with the rest of us. Still won't stop some doing their "I know best, you know nothing" act mind. I think the Echo overdid the headline though. Thousands of people work away from home and only get back now and then. In fact my children wouldn't see me for months on end when I was stationed overseas. Good luck to Jane, Greg, Gemma and Katie.
[quote][p][bold]new2it[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]JANE HARDING[/bold] wrote: I am not saying the council could have done more in the circumstances and limited school places in these circumstances and there are class size laws. However just wanted to Highlight that there are many many families with children at different schools out of there residential area with problematic transport issues and lack of available school places for KS1 children is and has been inadequate for some time which highlights poor planning and provision. In one class alone many parents struggle with juggling their children at separate schools. It is a big problem in the area and we are not isolated. When we moved to Highcliffe not out of choice but work redundancy there was only one school out of 22 nearest schools across dorset hampshire border with a yr2 place. So where does the next child go to? Also you can not underestimate the stress that this sort of situatin can place on a family> Not the school places but how the child reacts to be separated from sibling and not being able to be taken to school by parent when the older child is. My child is now at a supportive school and is able to be taken to school by a parent and has revrted back to the child I know! It is not easy being a parent and we make choices based on what we think is best for the child at the time!!.[/p][/quote]I can't believe people are putting a thumbs down on this.[/p][/quote]Oh I wouldn't worry about thumbs up or down, they are meaningless. The lady did what she thought best for her children, nothing to do with the rest of us. Still won't stop some doing their "I know best, you know nothing" act mind. I think the Echo overdid the headline though. Thousands of people work away from home and only get back now and then. In fact my children wouldn't see me for months on end when I was stationed overseas. Good luck to Jane, Greg, Gemma and Katie. ShuttleX
  • Score: 1

5:41pm Wed 30 Apr 14

BIGTONE says...

There's a good sandwich in Kent.
There's a good sandwich in Kent. BIGTONE
  • Score: -4

6:04pm Wed 30 Apr 14

Yankee1 says...

Portacabins.
Portacabins. Yankee1
  • Score: -4

8:55pm Wed 30 Apr 14

Bob49 says...

But she is quite happy for the kids to 'suffer the stress' of living a hundred or so miles from their father.

Reflects more on the lack of decent journalism in the Echo than it does any reasonable complaint from this woman.
But she is quite happy for the kids to 'suffer the stress' of living a hundred or so miles from their father. Reflects more on the lack of decent journalism in the Echo than it does any reasonable complaint from this woman. Bob49
  • Score: 4

10:58pm Wed 30 Apr 14

sammmymac says...

rozmister wrote:
Hessenford wrote:
Baysider wrote:
Morrigan wrote:
If as the council claim they "did their best", it is obviously not GOOD ENOUGH!

I know someone who lives within yards of a school, yet could not get her child into it because there are so many kids from out of the area wanting to go there and filling up the available spaces. Her child now goes in a council paid for taxi to a school more than five miles away! Ridiculous!

It is high time ALL schools were improved, so we don't have the system we have now, where parents clamour to send their children to a "decent" school out of their own area - ALL children deserve a decent education - meaning ALL the schools should be providing one, not just one or two!!
Rant, rant, rant!

Perhaps, before this couple moved they should have checked out the school situation before deciding where they were going to live? The council have done more than enough to help in providing transport to assist with a situation where the only alternative would be to throw a child out of the school to open up a space for someone who moved there after the year started.
Never used to get this problem years ago when moving to a new area so obviously councils are not keeping up to speed by providing relevant places, it seems to be more cost effective to spend thousands on taxis rather than making schools larger for the increasing population.
It probably does work out cheaper to pay for a taxi rather than pay to build an extension on a school to provide additional capacity for 1 or 2 children. There's a limit for classroom sizes for under 7's too which would make it hard to just stick another child in midway through the year if they were at maximum capacity already.
You say "it probably does work out cheaper to pay for a taxi rather than pay to build an extension on a school to provide additional capacity for 1 or 2 children"

PLUS THE SALARY FOR THE EXTRA TEACHER! Classrooms are not just rooms full of children, there needs to be a teacher there too so obviously taxis are the cheaper option.
Plenty of families have children in different schools, and plenty of rural children and children going to special schools have to take buses and taxis at a young age, it's character building. Of course it's not ideal but sometimes life isn't perfect and we have to accept it and get on with things. I don't understand this story because once the older child is a secondary school, they'd naturally be at different schools anyway.
[quote][p][bold]rozmister[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Baysider[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Morrigan[/bold] wrote: If as the council claim they "did their best", it is obviously not GOOD ENOUGH! I know someone who lives within yards of a school, yet could not get her child into it because there are so many kids from out of the area wanting to go there and filling up the available spaces. Her child now goes in a council paid for taxi to a school more than five miles away! Ridiculous! It is high time ALL schools were improved, so we don't have the system we have now, where parents clamour to send their children to a "decent" school out of their own area - ALL children deserve a decent education - meaning ALL the schools should be providing one, not just one or two!![/p][/quote]Rant, rant, rant! Perhaps, before this couple moved they should have checked out the school situation before deciding where they were going to live? The council have done more than enough to help in providing transport to assist with a situation where the only alternative would be to throw a child out of the school to open up a space for someone who moved there after the year started.[/p][/quote]Never used to get this problem years ago when moving to a new area so obviously councils are not keeping up to speed by providing relevant places, it seems to be more cost effective to spend thousands on taxis rather than making schools larger for the increasing population.[/p][/quote]It probably does work out cheaper to pay for a taxi rather than pay to build an extension on a school to provide additional capacity for 1 or 2 children. There's a limit for classroom sizes for under 7's too which would make it hard to just stick another child in midway through the year if they were at maximum capacity already.[/p][/quote]You say "it probably does work out cheaper to pay for a taxi rather than pay to build an extension on a school to provide additional capacity for 1 or 2 children" PLUS THE SALARY FOR THE EXTRA TEACHER! Classrooms are not just rooms full of children, there needs to be a teacher there too so obviously taxis are the cheaper option. Plenty of families have children in different schools, and plenty of rural children and children going to special schools have to take buses and taxis at a young age, it's character building. Of course it's not ideal but sometimes life isn't perfect and we have to accept it and get on with things. I don't understand this story because once the older child is a secondary school, they'd naturally be at different schools anyway. sammmymac
  • Score: 3

11:44pm Wed 30 Apr 14

scouserinbmth says...

forest-dweller wrote:
How pathetic. 2 of my kids go to school 12 miles to the east of me, and the other goes to a special needs school 9 miles to the west (and like this woman's kid, has a taxi). I don't find it stressful, not do my kids. The disabled one loves his taxi ride. Maybe she should get the taxi to take her eldest rather than youngest.
i agree with you, i had 2 disabled children going to different schools and we had to transport them ourselves as we could not use taxis, 1 child would start at 9 and the other started at 9-30 due to the distance but we just got on with it without running to the echo, and we both worked full time
[quote][p][bold]forest-dweller[/bold] wrote: How pathetic. 2 of my kids go to school 12 miles to the east of me, and the other goes to a special needs school 9 miles to the west (and like this woman's kid, has a taxi). I don't find it stressful, not do my kids. The disabled one loves his taxi ride. Maybe she should get the taxi to take her eldest rather than youngest.[/p][/quote]i agree with you, i had 2 disabled children going to different schools and we had to transport them ourselves as we could not use taxis, 1 child would start at 9 and the other started at 9-30 due to the distance but we just got on with it without running to the echo, and we both worked full time scouserinbmth
  • Score: 5

9:20am Thu 1 May 14

IYSWIM says...

Looks like both school run breakfast clubs-Couldn't one child go to breakfast club to allow mum to then roll on into second school drop? This would have been an extra way to make friends in the early days too. Most schools also have an extensive program of after school clubs too which would cover the different pick ups. Many many families have to do this especially when children are a few years apart with age, there will so often be different schools as they progress through the system. Shame to break up the family. Shame to invole the publicity wheel too although maybe the echo have made more of it with dramatic headline?
Looks like both school run breakfast clubs-Couldn't one child go to breakfast club to allow mum to then roll on into second school drop? This would have been an extra way to make friends in the early days too. Most schools also have an extensive program of after school clubs too which would cover the different pick ups. Many many families have to do this especially when children are a few years apart with age, there will so often be different schools as they progress through the system. Shame to break up the family. Shame to invole the publicity wheel too although maybe the echo have made more of it with dramatic headline? IYSWIM
  • Score: 1

9:40am Thu 1 May 14

JackJohnson says...

Will they be claiming council tax discount for low occupancy on both houses?

That'll further reduce council funds for both councils.
Will they be claiming council tax discount for low occupancy on both houses? That'll further reduce council funds for both councils. JackJohnson
  • Score: 1

9:47am Thu 1 May 14

rozmister says...

sammmymac wrote:
rozmister wrote:
Hessenford wrote:
Baysider wrote:
Morrigan wrote:
If as the council claim they "did their best", it is obviously not GOOD ENOUGH!

I know someone who lives within yards of a school, yet could not get her child into it because there are so many kids from out of the area wanting to go there and filling up the available spaces. Her child now goes in a council paid for taxi to a school more than five miles away! Ridiculous!

It is high time ALL schools were improved, so we don't have the system we have now, where parents clamour to send their children to a "decent" school out of their own area - ALL children deserve a decent education - meaning ALL the schools should be providing one, not just one or two!!
Rant, rant, rant!

Perhaps, before this couple moved they should have checked out the school situation before deciding where they were going to live? The council have done more than enough to help in providing transport to assist with a situation where the only alternative would be to throw a child out of the school to open up a space for someone who moved there after the year started.
Never used to get this problem years ago when moving to a new area so obviously councils are not keeping up to speed by providing relevant places, it seems to be more cost effective to spend thousands on taxis rather than making schools larger for the increasing population.
It probably does work out cheaper to pay for a taxi rather than pay to build an extension on a school to provide additional capacity for 1 or 2 children. There's a limit for classroom sizes for under 7's too which would make it hard to just stick another child in midway through the year if they were at maximum capacity already.
You say "it probably does work out cheaper to pay for a taxi rather than pay to build an extension on a school to provide additional capacity for 1 or 2 children"

PLUS THE SALARY FOR THE EXTRA TEACHER! Classrooms are not just rooms full of children, there needs to be a teacher there too so obviously taxis are the cheaper option.
Plenty of families have children in different schools, and plenty of rural children and children going to special schools have to take buses and taxis at a young age, it's character building. Of course it's not ideal but sometimes life isn't perfect and we have to accept it and get on with things. I don't understand this story because once the older child is a secondary school, they'd naturally be at different schools anyway.
I doubt they'd employ an additional teacher to teach 1 or 2 children which is the amount we're talking about in this case. To warrant that cost a school would need to create an additional class for the teacher and then you'd be talking about building a much larger extension than one to house 1 or 2 children. As well that would probably create excess capacity as we're talking about a few children not getting into the closest school not a whole class!

I agree that while it's not ideal for a child to take a taxi to school it's not a crisis, children in care take taxis to their old schools every day the difference being that they don't have a parent on the scene to take the story to the Echo and move them hundreds of miles away!
[quote][p][bold]sammmymac[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]rozmister[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Baysider[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Morrigan[/bold] wrote: If as the council claim they "did their best", it is obviously not GOOD ENOUGH! I know someone who lives within yards of a school, yet could not get her child into it because there are so many kids from out of the area wanting to go there and filling up the available spaces. Her child now goes in a council paid for taxi to a school more than five miles away! Ridiculous! It is high time ALL schools were improved, so we don't have the system we have now, where parents clamour to send their children to a "decent" school out of their own area - ALL children deserve a decent education - meaning ALL the schools should be providing one, not just one or two!![/p][/quote]Rant, rant, rant! Perhaps, before this couple moved they should have checked out the school situation before deciding where they were going to live? The council have done more than enough to help in providing transport to assist with a situation where the only alternative would be to throw a child out of the school to open up a space for someone who moved there after the year started.[/p][/quote]Never used to get this problem years ago when moving to a new area so obviously councils are not keeping up to speed by providing relevant places, it seems to be more cost effective to spend thousands on taxis rather than making schools larger for the increasing population.[/p][/quote]It probably does work out cheaper to pay for a taxi rather than pay to build an extension on a school to provide additional capacity for 1 or 2 children. There's a limit for classroom sizes for under 7's too which would make it hard to just stick another child in midway through the year if they were at maximum capacity already.[/p][/quote]You say "it probably does work out cheaper to pay for a taxi rather than pay to build an extension on a school to provide additional capacity for 1 or 2 children" PLUS THE SALARY FOR THE EXTRA TEACHER! Classrooms are not just rooms full of children, there needs to be a teacher there too so obviously taxis are the cheaper option. Plenty of families have children in different schools, and plenty of rural children and children going to special schools have to take buses and taxis at a young age, it's character building. Of course it's not ideal but sometimes life isn't perfect and we have to accept it and get on with things. I don't understand this story because once the older child is a secondary school, they'd naturally be at different schools anyway.[/p][/quote]I doubt they'd employ an additional teacher to teach 1 or 2 children which is the amount we're talking about in this case. To warrant that cost a school would need to create an additional class for the teacher and then you'd be talking about building a much larger extension than one to house 1 or 2 children. As well that would probably create excess capacity as we're talking about a few children not getting into the closest school not a whole class! I agree that while it's not ideal for a child to take a taxi to school it's not a crisis, children in care take taxis to their old schools every day the difference being that they don't have a parent on the scene to take the story to the Echo and move them hundreds of miles away! rozmister
  • Score: 1

2:40pm Thu 1 May 14

stevobath says...

And people wonder why kids are so wimpy nowadays.
And people wonder why kids are so wimpy nowadays. stevobath
  • Score: 2

10:27pm Thu 1 May 14

pete woodley says...

Baysider wrote:
Morrigan wrote:
If as the council claim they "did their bestThe last sentence sums it up exactly,Think first before moving,dont expect others to chase around after you.
[quote][p][bold]Baysider[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Morrigan[/bold] wrote: If as the council claim they "did their bestThe last sentence sums it up exactly,Think first before moving,dont expect others to chase around after you. pete woodley
  • Score: 1

3:47pm Mon 5 May 14

Rich© says...

KitKatPuss wrote:
I'm sorry....taxis to school? I used to walk 3 miles to school and 3 miles back every day...Monday to Friday...it was never a hassle....when I was a child I was allocated to a school and my parents had to lump it (so to speak).

I understand that child has become withdrawn having to get a taxi to school and doesn't travel in with her class mates.....however surely moving back to Kent and the children living without their male parent figure is going to be even more traumatic?

Cutting nose of to spite face really...sorry but no sympathy.
same here and there was the same amount of schools back in my days. No choice in what school we got to go to, we just got on with it, all 3 of us all at different schools, no family cars, no taxis or push bikes, we all walked in various directions.

why should things be any different these days ?
[quote][p][bold]KitKatPuss[/bold] wrote: I'm sorry....taxis to school? I used to walk 3 miles to school and 3 miles back every day...Monday to Friday...it was never a hassle....when I was a child I was allocated to a school and my parents had to lump it (so to speak). I understand that child has become withdrawn having to get a taxi to school and doesn't travel in with her class mates.....however surely moving back to Kent and the children living without their male parent figure is going to be even more traumatic? Cutting nose of to spite face really...sorry but no sympathy.[/p][/quote]same here and there was the same amount of schools back in my days. No choice in what school we got to go to, we just got on with it, all 3 of us all at different schools, no family cars, no taxis or push bikes, we all walked in various directions. why should things be any different these days ? Rich©
  • Score: 0

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