Bournemouth MP calls for increase in sea defences after storms

Bournemouth Echo: 'We must protect our beautiful seafront' - MP calls for increase in sea defences after storms 'We must protect our beautiful seafront' - MP calls for increase in sea defences after storms

MP TOBIAS Ellwood has called for funds to be allocated to Bournemouth’s seafront to ‘protect the beautiful beach before it’s too late.’

The call comes after more than a month of relentless rain, floods and gales.

He said: “We need a serious debate about long-term strategic plans to make sure our beautiful seafront is protected. We have been having discussions for years but now these talks need to be brought forward.

“We must increase our sea defences so we don’t lose the beach and our biggest attraction could be ruined.”

Mr Ellwood, who represents Bournemouth East, said if this recent weather became a regular pattern, shoring up Bournemouth’s coastline was essential.

This comes days after PM David Cameron pledged that ‘money is no object’ and announcing that cash grants would be given to flood-hit households.

Responding to this, Mr Ellwood said that it was not clear yet how the money will be allocated but he had been assured Bournemouth was earmarked for the funds.

Areas affected by the River Stour and the Iford Bridge Home park could be in for relief money.

Leader of Bournemouth Borough Council John Beesley said that the council is currently in negotiation with the Environment Agency regarding the next few years’ allocation for coastal protection.

He said: “Much of the funding that we received from the Agency has been cut on top of the overall cuts to local authority.”

Comments (22)

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7:54am Sat 15 Feb 14

wonderway says...

BEASLEY must love this flood protect fund is not ring fence so can be used for anything it likes
BEASLEY must love this flood protect fund is not ring fence so can be used for anything it likes wonderway
  • Score: 7

7:54am Sat 15 Feb 14

billy bumble says...

Look Ellwood and Beesley

This is called "Doing your job"

Why run to the papers all the time?

Idiots
Look Ellwood and Beesley This is called "Doing your job" Why run to the papers all the time? Idiots billy bumble
  • Score: 9

8:00am Sat 15 Feb 14

BarrHumbug says...

Protect the beach? How the hell are you going to do that, build a 50ft wall at the shoreline? Maybe with some doors in it so that people can nip out for a swim?
Central government may have said money is no object, but that's relief money, nothing said about cash to invest in long term preventative measures, I suspect the council will have to fund that themselves, perhaps they could use that stock pile reserved for Bank of Bournemouth?
Protect the beach? How the hell are you going to do that, build a 50ft wall at the shoreline? Maybe with some doors in it so that people can nip out for a swim? Central government may have said money is no object, but that's relief money, nothing said about cash to invest in long term preventative measures, I suspect the council will have to fund that themselves, perhaps they could use that stock pile reserved for Bank of Bournemouth? BarrHumbug
  • Score: 4

8:58am Sat 15 Feb 14

Moro99 says...

Protect life and homes first
Protect life and homes first Moro99
  • Score: 4

9:17am Sat 15 Feb 14

MrsRuggaball says...

Shameless jumping on the bandwagon by our MP there then!
Shameless jumping on the bandwagon by our MP there then! MrsRuggaball
  • Score: 18

10:55am Sat 15 Feb 14

Baywolf says...

Hmmm he didn't argue that with the Windfarm of the coast or did he hard to keep up with the Tories these days
Hmmm he didn't argue that with the Windfarm of the coast or did he hard to keep up with the Tories these days Baywolf
  • Score: 1

10:59am Sat 15 Feb 14

speedy231278 says...

Presumably protecting our 'beautiful' beach would involved not having a huge windfarm visible from it, nor approving an asinine scheme for a zipline onto it from the pier?
Presumably protecting our 'beautiful' beach would involved not having a huge windfarm visible from it, nor approving an asinine scheme for a zipline onto it from the pier? speedy231278
  • Score: 2

11:23am Sat 15 Feb 14

BmthNewshound says...

Protecting peoples homes, businesses, and farmland used to produce food should be given priority. Giving money to Bournemouth Council is about as responsible as giving a bottle of whiskey to an alcoholic.
.
The real danger to Bournemouth beach isn't the weather but the Councils plans to overly commercialise the beach by turning it into some kind of coastal theme park and allowing the building of the tacky zip-wire attraction from the pier. Bearing in mind the weather we have been having and the few days a year these attractions will actually be used it does raise questions about their viability.
Protecting peoples homes, businesses, and farmland used to produce food should be given priority. Giving money to Bournemouth Council is about as responsible as giving a bottle of whiskey to an alcoholic. . The real danger to Bournemouth beach isn't the weather but the Councils plans to overly commercialise the beach by turning it into some kind of coastal theme park and allowing the building of the tacky zip-wire attraction from the pier. Bearing in mind the weather we have been having and the few days a year these attractions will actually be used it does raise questions about their viability. BmthNewshound
  • Score: 10

11:58am Sat 15 Feb 14

High Treason says...

"Beautiful" Hardly call it that. The whole are is an eyesore and the only thing that breaks up the blot is the gardens.
"Beautiful" Hardly call it that. The whole are is an eyesore and the only thing that breaks up the blot is the gardens. High Treason
  • Score: -1

12:29pm Sat 15 Feb 14

spooki says...

Surely the beach and shoreline is mainly natural so should be able to look after itself? We can help of course, but how about finding a way to help people who are living in flooded areas? Or cleaning up after natural events like we've had (and are still having)?
Clearing the drains would be a start...
Surely the beach and shoreline is mainly natural so should be able to look after itself? We can help of course, but how about finding a way to help people who are living in flooded areas? Or cleaning up after natural events like we've had (and are still having)? Clearing the drains would be a start... spooki
  • Score: 2

12:50pm Sat 15 Feb 14

muscliffman says...

Once more this MP appear to be knee jerking without researching the historic facts, because this seaside protection issue was resolved years ago.

At one time it was common for the Bournemouth seafront to be badly damaged during winter storms like those we have just experienced - and yes, for all the 'manmade climate change' fanatics we had storms like these and much worse back then, it was only the sensationalist modern media attention and the 'green' opportunists that were missing.

Huge sections of the Bournemouth promenade were frequently wrecked by the rough seas, sea walls, beach huts, shelters and even a Pier (Southbourne) were washed away in past storms. During the quieter weather periods all year round much of Bournemouth's sea wall/promenade once remained permanently in the sea like a harbour wall, with very little or no sandy beach at all in front of it.

Since sand 'reclamation' dredging was wisely introduced in the 1970's by Bournemouth Council this situation has been transformed and the sea now infrequently makes it to the promenade wall anywhere on Bournemouth front, even during severe winds. Basically providing the sand 'reclamation' programme is maintained we have already very successfully dealt with this seaside problem and there is far less threat to the Bournemouth coastline now than there ever was. Our winter sea defences are in excellent working condition and also serve as our main tourist attraction during the summer - it's our man made seven miles of sandy beach!

So let's concentrate on unresolved issues please, we still have plenty of those!
Once more this MP appear to be knee jerking without researching the historic facts, because this seaside protection issue was resolved years ago. At one time it was common for the Bournemouth seafront to be badly damaged during winter storms like those we have just experienced - and yes, for all the 'manmade climate change' fanatics we had storms like these and much worse back then, it was only the sensationalist modern media attention and the 'green' opportunists that were missing. Huge sections of the Bournemouth promenade were frequently wrecked by the rough seas, sea walls, beach huts, shelters and even a Pier (Southbourne) were washed away in past storms. During the quieter weather periods all year round much of Bournemouth's sea wall/promenade once remained permanently in the sea like a harbour wall, with very little or no sandy beach at all in front of it. Since sand 'reclamation' dredging was wisely introduced in the 1970's by Bournemouth Council this situation has been transformed and the sea now infrequently makes it to the promenade wall anywhere on Bournemouth front, even during severe winds. Basically providing the sand 'reclamation' programme is maintained we have already very successfully dealt with this seaside problem and there is far less threat to the Bournemouth coastline now than there ever was. Our winter sea defences are in excellent working condition and also serve as our main tourist attraction during the summer - it's our man made seven miles of sandy beach! So let's concentrate on unresolved issues please, we still have plenty of those! muscliffman
  • Score: 8

12:59pm Sat 15 Feb 14

beachcomber1 says...

spooki wrote:
Surely the beach and shoreline is mainly natural so should be able to look after itself? We can help of course, but how about finding a way to help people who are living in flooded areas? Or cleaning up after natural events like we've had (and are still having)?
Clearing the drains would be a start...
actually it's not natural at all. ever since the Prom was built the sand has had to be added - remember the major replenishment in 2008? i believe a replenishment usually happens every 15 years or so, but so much sand has been eroded that it's back to 2008 levels already. people are going to be crammed into quite a thin strip of sand this summer!
[quote][p][bold]spooki[/bold] wrote: Surely the beach and shoreline is mainly natural so should be able to look after itself? We can help of course, but how about finding a way to help people who are living in flooded areas? Or cleaning up after natural events like we've had (and are still having)? Clearing the drains would be a start...[/p][/quote]actually it's not natural at all. ever since the Prom was built the sand has had to be added - remember the major replenishment in 2008? i believe a replenishment usually happens every 15 years or so, but so much sand has been eroded that it's back to 2008 levels already. people are going to be crammed into quite a thin strip of sand this summer! beachcomber1
  • Score: 7

1:07pm Sat 15 Feb 14

beachcomber1 says...

High Treason wrote:
"Beautiful" Hardly call it that. The whole are is an eyesore and the only thing that breaks up the blot is the gardens.
eyesore is a bit harsh lol i suggest you need to go live elsewhere for a while to recalibrate your outlook on life, as you seem to have lost your appreciation for how nice this part of the world is!
[quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: "Beautiful" Hardly call it that. The whole are is an eyesore and the only thing that breaks up the blot is the gardens.[/p][/quote]eyesore is a bit harsh lol i suggest you need to go live elsewhere for a while to recalibrate your outlook on life, as you seem to have lost your appreciation for how nice this part of the world is! beachcomber1
  • Score: 3

1:24pm Sat 15 Feb 14

muscliffman says...

beachcomber1 wrote:
spooki wrote:
Surely the beach and shoreline is mainly natural so should be able to look after itself? We can help of course, but how about finding a way to help people who are living in flooded areas? Or cleaning up after natural events like we've had (and are still having)?
Clearing the drains would be a start...
actually it's not natural at all. ever since the Prom was built the sand has had to be added - remember the major replenishment in 2008? i believe a replenishment usually happens every 15 years or so, but so much sand has been eroded that it's back to 2008 levels already. people are going to be crammed into quite a thin strip of sand this summer!
Exactly, we can go further back to the 1970's when sand was first dredged from the Bay and piped to the seafront, immediately prior to that there was little beach other than at the two surviving Piers. The original beach has not been able to 'look after itself' since the promenade was first built because fresh replenishing sand was previously provided by on going erosion of the cliffs by both sea and weather. Without the promenade it is interesting to speculate where the local seafront might be today, but it would certainly be well inland and north of where it is now and of course it used to be in a line between Old Harry rocks and the Isle of Wight!
[quote][p][bold]beachcomber1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]spooki[/bold] wrote: Surely the beach and shoreline is mainly natural so should be able to look after itself? We can help of course, but how about finding a way to help people who are living in flooded areas? Or cleaning up after natural events like we've had (and are still having)? Clearing the drains would be a start...[/p][/quote]actually it's not natural at all. ever since the Prom was built the sand has had to be added - remember the major replenishment in 2008? i believe a replenishment usually happens every 15 years or so, but so much sand has been eroded that it's back to 2008 levels already. people are going to be crammed into quite a thin strip of sand this summer![/p][/quote]Exactly, we can go further back to the 1970's when sand was first dredged from the Bay and piped to the seafront, immediately prior to that there was little beach other than at the two surviving Piers. The original beach has not been able to 'look after itself' since the promenade was first built because fresh replenishing sand was previously provided by on going erosion of the cliffs by both sea and weather. Without the promenade it is interesting to speculate where the local seafront might be today, but it would certainly be well inland and north of where it is now and of course it used to be in a line between Old Harry rocks and the Isle of Wight! muscliffman
  • Score: 6

1:39pm Sat 15 Feb 14

The-Bleeding-Obvious says...

beachcomber1 wrote:
High Treason wrote:
"Beautiful" Hardly call it that. The whole are is an eyesore and the only thing that breaks up the blot is the gardens.
eyesore is a bit harsh lol i suggest you need to go live elsewhere for a while to recalibrate your outlook on life, as you seem to have lost your appreciation for how nice this part of the world is!
'We must protect our beautiful seafront'. Yes, from our councillors and jobsworths!
And it needed doing long before the arrival of the recent storms. Cars used to be banned from the prom throughout the summer months, now, with most of the beach huts removed the prom is a year round car park. The bastion shelters have been destroyed because after many decades they are suddenly too expensive to maintain. The ornate lamp posts on the prom have gone and then there is the mess we call pier approach. The seafront is far from beautiful!
[quote][p][bold]beachcomber1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: "Beautiful" Hardly call it that. The whole are is an eyesore and the only thing that breaks up the blot is the gardens.[/p][/quote]eyesore is a bit harsh lol i suggest you need to go live elsewhere for a while to recalibrate your outlook on life, as you seem to have lost your appreciation for how nice this part of the world is![/p][/quote]'We must protect our beautiful seafront'. Yes, from our councillors and jobsworths! And it needed doing long before the arrival of the recent storms. Cars used to be banned from the prom throughout the summer months, now, with most of the beach huts removed the prom is a year round car park. The bastion shelters have been destroyed because after many decades they are suddenly too expensive to maintain. The ornate lamp posts on the prom have gone and then there is the mess we call pier approach. The seafront is far from beautiful! The-Bleeding-Obvious
  • Score: 8

1:44pm Sat 15 Feb 14

The-Bleeding-Obvious says...

muscliffman wrote:
beachcomber1 wrote:
spooki wrote:
Surely the beach and shoreline is mainly natural so should be able to look after itself? We can help of course, but how about finding a way to help people who are living in flooded areas? Or cleaning up after natural events like we've had (and are still having)?
Clearing the drains would be a start...
actually it's not natural at all. ever since the Prom was built the sand has had to be added - remember the major replenishment in 2008? i believe a replenishment usually happens every 15 years or so, but so much sand has been eroded that it's back to 2008 levels already. people are going to be crammed into quite a thin strip of sand this summer!
Exactly, we can go further back to the 1970's when sand was first dredged from the Bay and piped to the seafront, immediately prior to that there was little beach other than at the two surviving Piers. The original beach has not been able to 'look after itself' since the promenade was first built because fresh replenishing sand was previously provided by on going erosion of the cliffs by both sea and weather. Without the promenade it is interesting to speculate where the local seafront might be today, but it would certainly be well inland and north of where it is now and of course it used to be in a line between Old Harry rocks and the Isle of Wight!
The prom was routinely undermined by the sea up until the first replenishment which I think was around 76/78 until then the only beach was around the piers, bolson's jetty and on the Poole side of the groynes.
[quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]beachcomber1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]spooki[/bold] wrote: Surely the beach and shoreline is mainly natural so should be able to look after itself? We can help of course, but how about finding a way to help people who are living in flooded areas? Or cleaning up after natural events like we've had (and are still having)? Clearing the drains would be a start...[/p][/quote]actually it's not natural at all. ever since the Prom was built the sand has had to be added - remember the major replenishment in 2008? i believe a replenishment usually happens every 15 years or so, but so much sand has been eroded that it's back to 2008 levels already. people are going to be crammed into quite a thin strip of sand this summer![/p][/quote]Exactly, we can go further back to the 1970's when sand was first dredged from the Bay and piped to the seafront, immediately prior to that there was little beach other than at the two surviving Piers. The original beach has not been able to 'look after itself' since the promenade was first built because fresh replenishing sand was previously provided by on going erosion of the cliffs by both sea and weather. Without the promenade it is interesting to speculate where the local seafront might be today, but it would certainly be well inland and north of where it is now and of course it used to be in a line between Old Harry rocks and the Isle of Wight![/p][/quote]The prom was routinely undermined by the sea up until the first replenishment which I think was around 76/78 until then the only beach was around the piers, bolson's jetty and on the Poole side of the groynes. The-Bleeding-Obvious
  • Score: 8

2:12pm Sat 15 Feb 14

Bob49 says...

Here's three million

any ideas what we could do with that ?

put it into sandbags that will quickly rot and dump it off Boscombe beach

still who cares about money when all you have to do is spend spend spend and then put it down as paliamentary expenses, eh Tobias


ps at least we have been getting plenty of 'free' electricity with all these winds
Here's three million any ideas what we could do with that ? put it into sandbags that will quickly rot and dump it off Boscombe beach still who cares about money when all you have to do is spend spend spend and then put it down as paliamentary expenses, eh Tobias ps at least we have been getting plenty of 'free' electricity with all these winds Bob49
  • Score: 0

10:32pm Sat 15 Feb 14

Hessenford says...

With the recent rough seas hopefully the surf reef will have been broken up and consigned to history.
With the recent rough seas hopefully the surf reef will have been broken up and consigned to history. Hessenford
  • Score: 5

10:36pm Sat 15 Feb 14

Hessenford says...

I think Bournemouth got off pretty lightly when you see the devastation caused around the rest of the country, There are more deserving places to pour money into rather than Bournemouth, just because a few beach hut have been smashed doesn't necessitate massive sea defences in this area.
I think Bournemouth got off pretty lightly when you see the devastation caused around the rest of the country, There are more deserving places to pour money into rather than Bournemouth, just because a few beach hut have been smashed doesn't necessitate massive sea defences in this area. Hessenford
  • Score: 4

10:51pm Sat 15 Feb 14

muscliffman says...

Hessenford wrote:
With the recent rough seas hopefully the surf reef will have been broken up and consigned to history.
I did hear that the Boscombe surf reef sandbags were seen the other day being loaded onto a Christchurch Council truck...........
[quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: With the recent rough seas hopefully the surf reef will have been broken up and consigned to history.[/p][/quote]I did hear that the Boscombe surf reef sandbags were seen the other day being loaded onto a Christchurch Council truck........... muscliffman
  • Score: 2

10:58pm Sat 15 Feb 14

Hessenford says...

muscliffman wrote:
Hessenford wrote:
With the recent rough seas hopefully the surf reef will have been broken up and consigned to history.
I did hear that the Boscombe surf reef sandbags were seen the other day being loaded onto a Christchurch Council truck...........
And being sold for £7.50 each no doubt.
[quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: With the recent rough seas hopefully the surf reef will have been broken up and consigned to history.[/p][/quote]I did hear that the Boscombe surf reef sandbags were seen the other day being loaded onto a Christchurch Council truck...........[/p][/quote]And being sold for £7.50 each no doubt. Hessenford
  • Score: 3

1:45pm Sun 16 Feb 14

Glashen says...

muscliffman wrote:
beachcomber1 wrote:
spooki wrote:
Surely the beach and shoreline is mainly natural so should be able to look after itself? We can help of course, but how about finding a way to help people who are living in flooded areas? Or cleaning up after natural events like we've had (and are still having)?
Clearing the drains would be a start...
actually it's not natural at all. ever since the Prom was built the sand has had to be added - remember the major replenishment in 2008? i believe a replenishment usually happens every 15 years or so, but so much sand has been eroded that it's back to 2008 levels already. people are going to be crammed into quite a thin strip of sand this summer!
Exactly, we can go further back to the 1970's when sand was first dredged from the Bay and piped to the seafront, immediately prior to that there was little beach other than at the two surviving Piers. The original beach has not been able to 'look after itself' since the promenade was first built because fresh replenishing sand was previously provided by on going erosion of the cliffs by both sea and weather. Without the promenade it is interesting to speculate where the local seafront might be today, but it would certainly be well inland and north of where it is now and of course it used to be in a line between Old Harry rocks and the Isle of Wight!
If you go back far enough, about 450k years you could have walked straight from anywhere on the channel coast to France Albeit with a river crossing in the middle.
[quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]beachcomber1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]spooki[/bold] wrote: Surely the beach and shoreline is mainly natural so should be able to look after itself? We can help of course, but how about finding a way to help people who are living in flooded areas? Or cleaning up after natural events like we've had (and are still having)? Clearing the drains would be a start...[/p][/quote]actually it's not natural at all. ever since the Prom was built the sand has had to be added - remember the major replenishment in 2008? i believe a replenishment usually happens every 15 years or so, but so much sand has been eroded that it's back to 2008 levels already. people are going to be crammed into quite a thin strip of sand this summer![/p][/quote]Exactly, we can go further back to the 1970's when sand was first dredged from the Bay and piped to the seafront, immediately prior to that there was little beach other than at the two surviving Piers. The original beach has not been able to 'look after itself' since the promenade was first built because fresh replenishing sand was previously provided by on going erosion of the cliffs by both sea and weather. Without the promenade it is interesting to speculate where the local seafront might be today, but it would certainly be well inland and north of where it is now and of course it used to be in a line between Old Harry rocks and the Isle of Wight![/p][/quote]If you go back far enough, about 450k years you could have walked straight from anywhere on the channel coast to France Albeit with a river crossing in the middle. Glashen
  • Score: 0

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