UPDATE: Amber wind and rain warnings for Dorset as county told to expect gusts up to 70mph

Bournemouth Echo: More weather misery for Bournemouth, Poole and Dorset with wind and rain warnings issued More weather misery for Bournemouth, Poole and Dorset with wind and rain warnings issued

MORE weather misery is set to sweep across Dorset on Friday and Saturday with wind and rain warnings issued across the county.

After more storms earlier this week, the Met Office has issued amber and yellow rain and wind warnings for Friday and Saturday.

Check out our February 2014 storm pictures here

The amber rain warning lasts from 6am until 2pm on Friday covering Dorset with a yellow warning for Bournemouth and Poole in place from 4am on Friday until 6am on Saturday.

The amber wind warning is in place from 6pm on Friday until 10am on Saturday.

A spokesperson said about the amber rain warning: “A spell of heavy rain is expected to affect much of Cornwall, south and east Devon, along with parts of Somerset and Dorset during Friday morning, clearing to the east during the afternoon. 15-25 mm of rain will fall widely within the Amber warning area with 40 mm possible in a few places.

“The public should be prepared for further disruption due to both surface water and river flooding.

“This warning should be viewed alongside the wider yellow warning.”

Regarding the wind warning, a spokesperson said: “A further period of very strong winds is possible across southern and southeastern counties of England from Friday afternoon, overnight into Saturday morning.

"Gusts of 70 mph are likely in the Amber warning area with isolated 80 mph gusts possible along most exposed parts of the south coast. Winds will ease from the west during Saturday morning.

The public should be aware of the potential for disruption to travel as well as trees being uprooted and perhaps damage to buildings.

"The very strong winds will be accompanied by large waves along the south coast and the public should also be aware of these potentially dangerous conditions and also the possibility of coastal flooding.

"This warning accompanies a larger yellow warning and has been issued as there is now more confidence in the evolution of the system leading to a medium risk of significant impacts.

"Yet another storm has developed to the west of the Azores. It will run northeastwards across western and northern parts of the UK during Friday and into Saturday, before clearing to the northeast.

"Around the southern flank of this storm very strong southerly or southwesterly winds are expected to develop, primarily affecting southern and southeastern counties of England.

"There remains some uncertainty in the track and timings of this system but gusts of 60-70 mph are possible with perhaps 80 mph along most exposed parts of the south coast.

"With these strong winds some large waves are also likely along the south coast and there is the potential for some coastal flooding where this coincides with high tides."

Residents have been urged to avoid steps leading from Alum Chine to West Overcliff Drive due to a fallen tree and the Avon Causeway was also closed due to flooding.

A spokesperson for the Environment Agency said: "For the Dorset coastline there is a HIGH flood risk on Friday and Saturday due to a combination of large waves, high tides and gale force onshore winds.

"Elsewhere along most of the south coast of England, there is a LOW flood risk from coastal flooding on Friday and Saturday.

"Impacts are likely to include spray and wave over-topping in localised areas, with the risk to life and the further degradation of natural sea defences in Dorset. 

"There is also a LOW groundwater flood risk in Dorset and much of south-east England through the next three days, increasing to MEDIUM flood risk on Friday onwards in Dorset."

 

Get the latest forecast here 

Tonight, Dorset County Council has issued the following information:

Residents are being warned to prepare for more heavy rain and strong winds this weekend, with coastal areas particularly at risks. 

Gale force winds and large waves are set to batter the Dorset coastline overnight Friday and into Saturday, and the Chiswell area of Portland is again facing the prospect of flooding.

The latest band of extreme weather will hit the south west tomorrow (Friday, February 14).

And Dorset County Council is working with partners including the Environment Agency, district and borough councils, the NHS, Highways Agency and the emergency services to prepare for the possible impacts on local communities.

Waves up to ten metres high are set to crash onto beaches, promenades and coastal paths at high tide, which could put lives at risk if people get too close.

Residents in Chiswell are being contacted directly about the possibility of flooding, and the Portland Heights Hotel is again being stood up as an emergency rest centre if people there need to evacuate their homes.

Portland Beach Road and Preston Beach Road in Weymouth will be closely monitored by the county council’s highways team in case flooding forces temporary closures tomorrow night.

Further inland, ground water and surface water issues will again be an issue due to heavy downpours. Motorists are advised to take extra care and check Travel Dorset.com for regular updates.

Simon Parker, the county council’s emergency planning officer, said: “We’re preparing for another onslaught of weather this weekend. People should expect their day to be different, and act accordingly.

“We have rest centres on standby in case we need to evacuate people from their homes. Residents should prepare for flooding in the affected areas and remember to bring any prescription medication with them if they are evacuated.

“Drivers need to check their routes and give themselves more time. If road users cannot avoid driving through water then take care and drive slowly to avoid damaging vehicles and creating waves that flood nearby properties.”

For advice and guidance on floods and flooding visit www.dorsetforyou.com/travel-dorset/severe-weather

For up-to-date travel news visit www.dorsetforyou.com/traveldorset and for alerts on the go, follow us on twitter @TravelDorset.

Comments (9)

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1:14pm Thu 13 Feb 14

speedy231278 says...

We'll be fine now that Dave has declared 'money is no object' to sort things out!
We'll be fine now that Dave has declared 'money is no object' to sort things out! speedy231278

2:24pm Thu 13 Feb 14

hooplaa says...

Getting a bit boring now, it happens every year, we get bad weather we deal with it. Dont need 100 different pictures of the sea and twigs that have fallen off tree's everytime the wind blows - its not news
Getting a bit boring now, it happens every year, we get bad weather we deal with it. Dont need 100 different pictures of the sea and twigs that have fallen off tree's everytime the wind blows - its not news hooplaa

4:16pm Thu 13 Feb 14

sniffer says...

I expect the Environment Agency to come and fix that wobbly fence panel I have, its bound to finally go tomorrow.
I expect the Environment Agency to come and fix that wobbly fence panel I have, its bound to finally go tomorrow. sniffer

6:32pm Thu 13 Feb 14

Very Old Man says...

We never used to get this sort of weather under a Labour government.
We never used to get this sort of weather under a Labour government. Very Old Man

6:54pm Thu 13 Feb 14

scrumpyjack says...

hooplaa wrote:
Getting a bit boring now, it happens every year, we get bad weather we deal with it. Dont need 100 different pictures of the sea and twigs that have fallen off tree's everytime the wind blows - its not news
A bit of bad weather? Try telling that to all the people actually affected: commuters, business owners, flooded home owners, about to be flooded hone owners, the emergency services, the council (our money), the schools, hospitals, the train lines, the buses, the elderly, those who have spent night after night without power, the farmers,,,god the list is endless.

Still, as long as you have not really been affected eh?

A few facts for you (to help with the boredom for 5 seconds):

Last month's seasonal total was higher than any since 1767 and three times the average level.

A total of 146.9mm of rain fell in January, smashing the previous record of 138.7mm in 1852. The new record is three times the average recorded for the month over the last two and a half centuries. It was also the wettest winter month – December, January or February – ever recorded, beating December 1914, when 143.3mm fell.

Hey but f~~k those affected or interested eh hoopla?
[quote][p][bold]hooplaa[/bold] wrote: Getting a bit boring now, it happens every year, we get bad weather we deal with it. Dont need 100 different pictures of the sea and twigs that have fallen off tree's everytime the wind blows - its not news[/p][/quote]A bit of bad weather? Try telling that to all the people actually affected: commuters, business owners, flooded home owners, about to be flooded hone owners, the emergency services, the council (our money), the schools, hospitals, the train lines, the buses, the elderly, those who have spent night after night without power, the farmers,,,god the list is endless. Still, as long as you have not really been affected eh? A few facts for you (to help with the boredom for 5 seconds): Last month's seasonal total was higher than any since 1767 and three times the average level. A total of 146.9mm of rain fell in January, smashing the previous record of 138.7mm in 1852. The new record is three times the average recorded for the month over the last two and a half centuries. It was also the wettest winter month – December, January or February – ever recorded, beating December 1914, when 143.3mm fell. Hey but f~~k those affected or interested eh hoopla? scrumpyjack

7:29pm Thu 13 Feb 14

nickynoodah says...

scrumpyjack wrote:
hooplaa wrote:
Getting a bit boring now, it happens every year, we get bad weather we deal with it. Dont need 100 different pictures of the sea and twigs that have fallen off tree's everytime the wind blows - its not news
A bit of bad weather? Try telling that to all the people actually affected: commuters, business owners, flooded home owners, about to be flooded hone owners, the emergency services, the council (our money), the schools, hospitals, the train lines, the buses, the elderly, those who have spent night after night without power, the farmers,,,god the list is endless.

Still, as long as you have not really been affected eh?

A few facts for you (to help with the boredom for 5 seconds):

Last month's seasonal total was higher than any since 1767 and three times the average level.

A total of 146.9mm of rain fell in January, smashing the previous record of 138.7mm in 1852. The new record is three times the average recorded for the month over the last two and a half centuries. It was also the wettest winter month – December, January or February – ever recorded, beating December 1914, when 143.3mm fell.

Hey but f~~k those affected or interested eh hoopla?
Don't venture out George its too windy your too old
we wouldn't want your derivatives to blow away
would we now
try being a redolent fungi for a change.
[quote][p][bold]scrumpyjack[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]hooplaa[/bold] wrote: Getting a bit boring now, it happens every year, we get bad weather we deal with it. Dont need 100 different pictures of the sea and twigs that have fallen off tree's everytime the wind blows - its not news[/p][/quote]A bit of bad weather? Try telling that to all the people actually affected: commuters, business owners, flooded home owners, about to be flooded hone owners, the emergency services, the council (our money), the schools, hospitals, the train lines, the buses, the elderly, those who have spent night after night without power, the farmers,,,god the list is endless. Still, as long as you have not really been affected eh? A few facts for you (to help with the boredom for 5 seconds): Last month's seasonal total was higher than any since 1767 and three times the average level. A total of 146.9mm of rain fell in January, smashing the previous record of 138.7mm in 1852. The new record is three times the average recorded for the month over the last two and a half centuries. It was also the wettest winter month – December, January or February – ever recorded, beating December 1914, when 143.3mm fell. Hey but f~~k those affected or interested eh hoopla?[/p][/quote]Don't venture out George its too windy your too old we wouldn't want your derivatives to blow away would we now try being a redolent fungi for a change. nickynoodah

9:43pm Thu 13 Feb 14

hooplaa says...

scrumpyjack wrote:
hooplaa wrote:
Getting a bit boring now, it happens every year, we get bad weather we deal with it. Dont need 100 different pictures of the sea and twigs that have fallen off tree's everytime the wind blows - its not news
A bit of bad weather? Try telling that to all the people actually affected: commuters, business owners, flooded home owners, about to be flooded hone owners, the emergency services, the council (our money), the schools, hospitals, the train lines, the buses, the elderly, those who have spent night after night without power, the farmers,,,god the list is endless.

Still, as long as you have not really been affected eh?

A few facts for you (to help with the boredom for 5 seconds):

Last month's seasonal total was higher than any since 1767 and three times the average level.

A total of 146.9mm of rain fell in January, smashing the previous record of 138.7mm in 1852. The new record is three times the average recorded for the month over the last two and a half centuries. It was also the wettest winter month – December, January or February – ever recorded, beating December 1914, when 143.3mm fell.

Hey but f~~k those affected or interested eh hoopla?
Take a trip out of your BH postcode and visit Somerset. Then moan to the people there about a few closed roads (lanes) and a few puddles and see if they take pity on you
[quote][p][bold]scrumpyjack[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]hooplaa[/bold] wrote: Getting a bit boring now, it happens every year, we get bad weather we deal with it. Dont need 100 different pictures of the sea and twigs that have fallen off tree's everytime the wind blows - its not news[/p][/quote]A bit of bad weather? Try telling that to all the people actually affected: commuters, business owners, flooded home owners, about to be flooded hone owners, the emergency services, the council (our money), the schools, hospitals, the train lines, the buses, the elderly, those who have spent night after night without power, the farmers,,,god the list is endless. Still, as long as you have not really been affected eh? A few facts for you (to help with the boredom for 5 seconds): Last month's seasonal total was higher than any since 1767 and three times the average level. A total of 146.9mm of rain fell in January, smashing the previous record of 138.7mm in 1852. The new record is three times the average recorded for the month over the last two and a half centuries. It was also the wettest winter month – December, January or February – ever recorded, beating December 1914, when 143.3mm fell. Hey but f~~k those affected or interested eh hoopla?[/p][/quote]Take a trip out of your BH postcode and visit Somerset. Then moan to the people there about a few closed roads (lanes) and a few puddles and see if they take pity on you hooplaa

10:23pm Thu 13 Feb 14

scrumpyjack says...

nickynoodah wrote:
scrumpyjack wrote:
hooplaa wrote:
Getting a bit boring now, it happens every year, we get bad weather we deal with it. Dont need 100 different pictures of the sea and twigs that have fallen off tree's everytime the wind blows - its not news
A bit of bad weather? Try telling that to all the people actually affected: commuters, business owners, flooded home owners, about to be flooded hone owners, the emergency services, the council (our money), the schools, hospitals, the train lines, the buses, the elderly, those who have spent night after night without power, the farmers,,,god the list is endless.

Still, as long as you have not really been affected eh?

A few facts for you (to help with the boredom for 5 seconds):

Last month's seasonal total was higher than any since 1767 and three times the average level.

A total of 146.9mm of rain fell in January, smashing the previous record of 138.7mm in 1852. The new record is three times the average recorded for the month over the last two and a half centuries. It was also the wettest winter month – December, January or February – ever recorded, beating December 1914, when 143.3mm fell.

Hey but f~~k those affected or interested eh hoopla?
Don't venture out George its too windy your too old
we wouldn't want your derivatives to blow away
would we now
try being a redolent fungi for a change.
Thank you.

I had to look it up.

Great word.


Redolent

adjective
1.
having a pleasant odor; fragrant.
2.
odorous or smelling (usually followed by of ): redolent of garlic.
3.
suggestive; reminiscent (usually followed by of ): verse redolent of Shakespeare.
[quote][p][bold]nickynoodah[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scrumpyjack[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]hooplaa[/bold] wrote: Getting a bit boring now, it happens every year, we get bad weather we deal with it. Dont need 100 different pictures of the sea and twigs that have fallen off tree's everytime the wind blows - its not news[/p][/quote]A bit of bad weather? Try telling that to all the people actually affected: commuters, business owners, flooded home owners, about to be flooded hone owners, the emergency services, the council (our money), the schools, hospitals, the train lines, the buses, the elderly, those who have spent night after night without power, the farmers,,,god the list is endless. Still, as long as you have not really been affected eh? A few facts for you (to help with the boredom for 5 seconds): Last month's seasonal total was higher than any since 1767 and three times the average level. A total of 146.9mm of rain fell in January, smashing the previous record of 138.7mm in 1852. The new record is three times the average recorded for the month over the last two and a half centuries. It was also the wettest winter month – December, January or February – ever recorded, beating December 1914, when 143.3mm fell. Hey but f~~k those affected or interested eh hoopla?[/p][/quote]Don't venture out George its too windy your too old we wouldn't want your derivatives to blow away would we now try being a redolent fungi for a change.[/p][/quote]Thank you. I had to look it up. Great word. Redolent [red-l-uhnt] adjective 1. having a pleasant odor; fragrant. 2. odorous or smelling (usually followed by of ): redolent of garlic. 3. suggestive; reminiscent (usually followed by of ): verse redolent of Shakespeare. scrumpyjack

10:30pm Thu 13 Feb 14

scrumpyjack says...

hooplaa wrote:
scrumpyjack wrote:
hooplaa wrote:
Getting a bit boring now, it happens every year, we get bad weather we deal with it. Dont need 100 different pictures of the sea and twigs that have fallen off tree's everytime the wind blows - its not news
A bit of bad weather? Try telling that to all the people actually affected: commuters, business owners, flooded home owners, about to be flooded hone owners, the emergency services, the council (our money), the schools, hospitals, the train lines, the buses, the elderly, those who have spent night after night without power, the farmers,,,god the list is endless.

Still, as long as you have not really been affected eh?

A few facts for you (to help with the boredom for 5 seconds):

Last month's seasonal total was higher than any since 1767 and three times the average level.

A total of 146.9mm of rain fell in January, smashing the previous record of 138.7mm in 1852. The new record is three times the average recorded for the month over the last two and a half centuries. It was also the wettest winter month – December, January or February – ever recorded, beating December 1914, when 143.3mm fell.

Hey but f~~k those affected or interested eh hoopla?
Take a trip out of your BH postcode and visit Somerset. Then moan to the people there about a few closed roads (lanes) and a few puddles and see if they take pity on you
What? Perhaps you should pop to Somerset and say "Getting a bit boring now, it happens every year, we get bad weather we deal with it"

My sympathy is to all adversely affected.

Post code was not part of my argument, understanding those who are in the crap because of it was - but still your attempt at back tracking really makes you look great and really credible .... .
[quote][p][bold]hooplaa[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scrumpyjack[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]hooplaa[/bold] wrote: Getting a bit boring now, it happens every year, we get bad weather we deal with it. Dont need 100 different pictures of the sea and twigs that have fallen off tree's everytime the wind blows - its not news[/p][/quote]A bit of bad weather? Try telling that to all the people actually affected: commuters, business owners, flooded home owners, about to be flooded hone owners, the emergency services, the council (our money), the schools, hospitals, the train lines, the buses, the elderly, those who have spent night after night without power, the farmers,,,god the list is endless. Still, as long as you have not really been affected eh? A few facts for you (to help with the boredom for 5 seconds): Last month's seasonal total was higher than any since 1767 and three times the average level. A total of 146.9mm of rain fell in January, smashing the previous record of 138.7mm in 1852. The new record is three times the average recorded for the month over the last two and a half centuries. It was also the wettest winter month – December, January or February – ever recorded, beating December 1914, when 143.3mm fell. Hey but f~~k those affected or interested eh hoopla?[/p][/quote]Take a trip out of your BH postcode and visit Somerset. Then moan to the people there about a few closed roads (lanes) and a few puddles and see if they take pity on you[/p][/quote]What? Perhaps you should pop to Somerset and say "Getting a bit boring now, it happens every year, we get bad weather we deal with it" My sympathy is to all adversely affected. Post code was not part of my argument, understanding those who are in the crap because of it was - but still your attempt at back tracking really makes you look great and really credible .... . scrumpyjack

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