Disabled people draw up their own Bill of Rights Charter to raise awareness about choices

Bournemouth Echo: RIGHTS: Amanda Frost, second left, with the mayor and mayoress of Bournemouth, Cllr Rod and Mrs Elaine Cooper and Dan Murray RIGHTS: Amanda Frost, second left, with the mayor and mayoress of Bournemouth, Cllr Rod and Mrs Elaine Cooper and Dan Murray

DISABLED people in Dorset have written and launched their own Bill of Rights Charter to fight for equality in all aspects of life.

Bournemouth People First, Poole Forum and People First Dorset have all worked together on the joint project to raise awareness about choices which some people may take for granted.

Organisations were invited to sign up to the charter which includes liberties such as the right to independence, the right to freedom of speech and the right to have feelings.

Amanda Frost, assistant manager at Bournemouth People First said: “Our goal is to lead a good quality life with the same rights and choices as everyone else has.

“It’s fantastic that these organisations and services give their support to the Charter, saying they believe in giving rights and choices to all people with learning disabilities in Dorset, for everyone to lead a better life.”

The Mayor of Bournemouth Cllr Rod Cooper, leader of the council John Beesley and representatives from the emergency services and several businesses attended the launch at the Life Centre in Moordown on January 13.

They were given the opportunity to sign up to the Charter and have their logo displayed on the Bournemouth People First website. Canadian disability rights speaker Dave Hingsburger said: “The people with experience of having a disability and being a recipient of a service are the only ones who know what is needed to change.

“The Bill of Rights is a beginning of a journey.”

Bournemouth People First is an advocacy charity run by and for people with learning disabilities in the Bournemouth area.

Manager Amanda Parsons said: “We were thrilled to have so much interest from so many organisations.

“It really is such a heartfelt and important development.”

Comments (3)

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5:24pm Wed 15 Jan 14

djd says...

Now all you have to do is to get businesses to sign up to give the disabled equal access to their stores. Have you ever sat in a wheelchair and tried to pay by card at stores lîke Next who removed their lowered counters and gave their card readers on such a short security cable that customers in wheelchairs cannot access them.
And as for disabled access in store such as Sports Direct, well try it and see.
Now all you have to do is to get businesses to sign up to give the disabled equal access to their stores. Have you ever sat in a wheelchair and tried to pay by card at stores lîke Next who removed their lowered counters and gave their card readers on such a short security cable that customers in wheelchairs cannot access them. And as for disabled access in store such as Sports Direct, well try it and see. djd
  • Score: 8

5:52pm Wed 15 Jan 14

madras says...

ope they started with keeping the pavements clear - that includes parked cars and bloody dustbins / wheely bins which are a menage to anyone with mobility issues (plus I assume anyone with pram/pushchair)

Although unless I am mistaken it's council policy to ask people to put their bins on the pavement - d'oh!
ope they started with keeping the pavements clear - that includes parked cars and bloody dustbins / wheely bins which are a menage to anyone with mobility issues (plus I assume anyone with pram/pushchair) Although unless I am mistaken it's council policy to ask people to put their bins on the pavement - d'oh! madras
  • Score: 3

6:17pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Carolyn43 says...

madras wrote:
ope they started with keeping the pavements clear - that includes parked cars and bloody dustbins / wheely bins which are a menage to anyone with mobility issues (plus I assume anyone with pram/pushchair)

Although unless I am mistaken it's council policy to ask people to put their bins on the pavement - d'oh!
I object to stores with an upper floor and no lift. Ask where something is and you're told it's on the upper floor. "No we don't have a lift, but tell us what you want and we'll bring a selection for you to choose from." No!!! Abled-bodied people can go up and browse. I should be able to go up and browse too! Able-bodied people wouldn't accept being told they can choose from a selection. No wonder on-line shopping is so successful and shops are in decline.
[quote][p][bold]madras[/bold] wrote: ope they started with keeping the pavements clear - that includes parked cars and bloody dustbins / wheely bins which are a menage to anyone with mobility issues (plus I assume anyone with pram/pushchair) Although unless I am mistaken it's council policy to ask people to put their bins on the pavement - d'oh![/p][/quote]I object to stores with an upper floor and no lift. Ask where something is and you're told it's on the upper floor. "No we don't have a lift, but tell us what you want and we'll bring a selection for you to choose from." No!!! Abled-bodied people can go up and browse. I should be able to go up and browse too! Able-bodied people wouldn't accept being told they can choose from a selection. No wonder on-line shopping is so successful and shops are in decline. Carolyn43
  • Score: 4

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