New food waste containers to be delivered to Bournemouth residents

New food waste containers to be delivered to Bournemouth residents

New food waste containers to be delivered to Bournemouth residents

First published in News

NEW food waste containers will start to be delivered to Bournemouth residents next week, ready for the start of a new collection service.

Containers, small kitchen caddies, compostable liners and instruction booklets will be delivered to households from next Tuesday until mid-February.

The first collections will take place in the week beginning March 3, when food waste will be collected weekly at the same time as the general rubbish.

The larger food waste container can either sit inside the general rubbish bin or be used as a stand-alone container. The small kitchen caddy can be stored inside to reduce trips outside to the large container.

Residents will be able to use their containers to collect uncooked vegetable and fruit waste, eggshells, cooked food, meat and fish bones, as well as food that is no longer edible.

Bournemouth residents who live in either private, council or housing association blocks of flats with communal bines will need to opt into the new collections to receive their food waste containers.

This can be done by calling 01202 451199 or emailing recycle@ bournemouth.gov.uk

Comments (27)

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7:56am Fri 3 Jan 14

whataboutthat says...

Complicating matters for little 'enviro' gain. Good business for the contanier manufacturers and German refuse truck manufacturers. Additional jobs for council 'green' monitors and 'target' compilers.
Complicating matters for little 'enviro' gain. Good business for the contanier manufacturers and German refuse truck manufacturers. Additional jobs for council 'green' monitors and 'target' compilers. whataboutthat
  • Score: 11

8:02am Fri 3 Jan 14

Jetwasher says...

We wont be using them here.. Bloody council jobsworths
We wont be using them here.. Bloody council jobsworths Jetwasher
  • Score: 8

9:15am Fri 3 Jan 14

woby_tide says...

Don't see the problem with them. Used them for a year over in Christchurch, stop the main bins smelling, less waste to landfill all for a tiny bit of effort by the homeowner.

Oh yes, therein lies the problem. Someone having to spend a tiny amount of their own precious time
Don't see the problem with them. Used them for a year over in Christchurch, stop the main bins smelling, less waste to landfill all for a tiny bit of effort by the homeowner. Oh yes, therein lies the problem. Someone having to spend a tiny amount of their own precious time woby_tide
  • Score: 5

9:17am Fri 3 Jan 14

Jetwasher says...

We will be recycling your containers in our recycling bin, two bins are enough for anyone one.
Reminds me of this fool britannia sketch.
http://www.youtube.c
om/watch?v=Zkj7gZmuu
hU
We will be recycling your containers in our recycling bin, two bins are enough for anyone one. Reminds me of this fool britannia sketch. http://www.youtube.c om/watch?v=Zkj7gZmuu hU Jetwasher
  • Score: 0

9:49am Fri 3 Jan 14

Teddy 1 says...

These 'slops' containers are disguisting and an envt hazard. My mum has one and the food is decayingwith all the nasty mold spores in her kitchen slops bin. The bags were supplied by her council for 6 months then this stopped. The local paper investivated the controversy but found the slops went in the same hole in the ground as the other rubbish!! Complete waste of time!! But yes, it creates jobs!!
These 'slops' containers are disguisting and an envt hazard. My mum has one and the food is decayingwith all the nasty mold spores in her kitchen slops bin. The bags were supplied by her council for 6 months then this stopped. The local paper investivated the controversy but found the slops went in the same hole in the ground as the other rubbish!! Complete waste of time!! But yes, it creates jobs!! Teddy 1
  • Score: 12

10:03am Fri 3 Jan 14

woby_tide says...

Teddy 1 wrote:
These 'slops' containers are disguisting and an envt hazard. My mum has one and the food is decayingwith all the nasty mold spores in her kitchen slops bin. The bags were supplied by her council for 6 months then this stopped. The local paper investivated the controversy but found the slops went in the same hole in the ground as the other rubbish!! Complete waste of time!! But yes, it creates jobs!!
You are allowed to clean them yourself. If the food is decaying then maybe it needs emptying to the main bin more often. As for the bags, the initial lot were supplied but as they are optional they aren't going to keep on providing them. Newspaper can be used if you don't want to pay for more bags. Or if you aren't able to manage a 7litre composter just give up and chuck the food waste in the old bin

As for the slops, they are being recycled locally, up to you if you want to believe something else though

http://www.dorsetfor
you.com/where-waste-
goes/food
[quote][p][bold]Teddy 1[/bold] wrote: These 'slops' containers are disguisting and an envt hazard. My mum has one and the food is decayingwith all the nasty mold spores in her kitchen slops bin. The bags were supplied by her council for 6 months then this stopped. The local paper investivated the controversy but found the slops went in the same hole in the ground as the other rubbish!! Complete waste of time!! But yes, it creates jobs!![/p][/quote]You are allowed to clean them yourself. If the food is decaying then maybe it needs emptying to the main bin more often. As for the bags, the initial lot were supplied but as they are optional they aren't going to keep on providing them. Newspaper can be used if you don't want to pay for more bags. Or if you aren't able to manage a 7litre composter just give up and chuck the food waste in the old bin As for the slops, they are being recycled locally, up to you if you want to believe something else though http://www.dorsetfor you.com/where-waste- goes/food woby_tide
  • Score: 10

10:47am Fri 3 Jan 14

DemonDiva says...

I used to work in the boy grammar school kitchen many years ago, and we had what was then called "the pig bin". All the leftovers went into that bin, and it was emptied weekly.
The stench on warmer days was unbelievable, and when the entire bin was just heaving with maggots was totally indescribable.
Same as this, just on a larger scale.
I used to work in the boy grammar school kitchen many years ago, and we had what was then called "the pig bin". All the leftovers went into that bin, and it was emptied weekly. The stench on warmer days was unbelievable, and when the entire bin was just heaving with maggots was totally indescribable. Same as this, just on a larger scale. DemonDiva
  • Score: 5

11:31am Fri 3 Jan 14

s-pb2 says...

Cant say I ever waste food anyway so wont be using it. What I do find odd though is despite the council spending fortunes implementing it and promoting it through 'roadshows', that people in flats & multi occupancy buildings are not going get these automatically and will continue to chuck food out in the normal manner anyway. So when you think of the high number of flats in Boscombe, Southbourne and West Howe, you wonder what is the point of all this
Cant say I ever waste food anyway so wont be using it. What I do find odd though is despite the council spending fortunes implementing it and promoting it through 'roadshows', that people in flats & multi occupancy buildings are not going get these automatically and will continue to chuck food out in the normal manner anyway. So when you think of the high number of flats in Boscombe, Southbourne and West Howe, you wonder what is the point of all this s-pb2
  • Score: 4

12:09pm Fri 3 Jan 14

Chris the plumber says...

Food banks and now a bin to put it in when you don't want to eat it ??
If the council are telling us all that food banks are necessary because we cant afford to buy food why an earth would they be paying out money so we can throw it all away again !!!
Food banks and now a bin to put it in when you don't want to eat it ?? If the council are telling us all that food banks are necessary because we cant afford to buy food why an earth would they be paying out money so we can throw it all away again !!! Chris the plumber
  • Score: 3

1:13pm Fri 3 Jan 14

muscliffman says...

It would be helpful if the Council would fully explain (in plain words) what this will actually achieve, not least to include an absolute guarantee to us all that the separated food waste won't be simply reunited with everything else we throw away immediately after collection. It is frequently reported in the national media that it is a quite common practice for differing refuse that has been sorted by UK householders to be simply combined as one for onward transport to a distant cheap land fill site.

So where will this carefully sorted Bournemouth food waste be going and what is the useful purpose?
It would be helpful if the Council would fully explain (in plain words) what this will actually achieve, not least to include an absolute guarantee to us all that the separated food waste won't be simply reunited with everything else we throw away immediately after collection. It is frequently reported in the national media that it is a quite common practice for differing refuse that has been sorted by UK householders to be simply combined as one for onward transport to a distant cheap land fill site. So where will this carefully sorted Bournemouth food waste be going and what is the useful purpose? muscliffman
  • Score: 4

1:49pm Fri 3 Jan 14

woby_tide says...

muscliffman wrote:
It would be helpful if the Council would fully explain (in plain words) what this will actually achieve, not least to include an absolute guarantee to us all that the separated food waste won't be simply reunited with everything else we throw away immediately after collection. It is frequently reported in the national media that it is a quite common practice for differing refuse that has been sorted by UK householders to be simply combined as one for onward transport to a distant cheap land fill site.

So where will this carefully sorted Bournemouth food waste be going and what is the useful purpose?
http://www.bournemou
th.gov.uk/Environmen
t/RecyclingWaste/Rec
ycling-Collection-Fo
od-Waste/Food-Waste-
Collections.aspx

" If you live in a house, you will receive:

A twelve litre collection container for outside the property which fits in your little bin or can stand alone,
A five litre food caddy for the kitchen,
Compostable liners and
An information pack."

So unfortunately that means people will actually need to spend some time reading something to be educated. Which as a lot of the comments on here have proved, the people of Bournemouth are far too busy to be inconvenienced by this
[quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: It would be helpful if the Council would fully explain (in plain words) what this will actually achieve, not least to include an absolute guarantee to us all that the separated food waste won't be simply reunited with everything else we throw away immediately after collection. It is frequently reported in the national media that it is a quite common practice for differing refuse that has been sorted by UK householders to be simply combined as one for onward transport to a distant cheap land fill site. So where will this carefully sorted Bournemouth food waste be going and what is the useful purpose?[/p][/quote]http://www.bournemou th.gov.uk/Environmen t/RecyclingWaste/Rec ycling-Collection-Fo od-Waste/Food-Waste- Collections.aspx " If you live in a house, you will receive: A twelve litre collection container for outside the property which fits in your little bin or can stand alone, A five litre food caddy for the kitchen, Compostable liners and An information pack." So unfortunately that means people will actually need to spend some time reading something to be educated. Which as a lot of the comments on here have proved, the people of Bournemouth are far too busy to be inconvenienced by this woby_tide
  • Score: 2

2:42pm Fri 3 Jan 14

muscliffman says...

woby_tide wrote:
muscliffman wrote:
It would be helpful if the Council would fully explain (in plain words) what this will actually achieve, not least to include an absolute guarantee to us all that the separated food waste won't be simply reunited with everything else we throw away immediately after collection. It is frequently reported in the national media that it is a quite common practice for differing refuse that has been sorted by UK householders to be simply combined as one for onward transport to a distant cheap land fill site.

So where will this carefully sorted Bournemouth food waste be going and what is the useful purpose?
http://www.bournemou

th.gov.uk/Environmen

t/RecyclingWaste/Rec

ycling-Collection-Fo

od-Waste/Food-Waste-

Collections.aspx

" If you live in a house, you will receive:

A twelve litre collection container for outside the property which fits in your little bin or can stand alone,
A five litre food caddy for the kitchen,
Compostable liners and
An information pack."

So unfortunately that means people will actually need to spend some time reading something to be educated. Which as a lot of the comments on here have proved, the people of Bournemouth are far too busy to be inconvenienced by this
I think it is safe to say 'to be educated' into accepting something questionable which most people clearly don't want. It all starts to sound rather sinister, the old question of public servants, or would be masters?
[quote][p][bold]woby_tide[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: It would be helpful if the Council would fully explain (in plain words) what this will actually achieve, not least to include an absolute guarantee to us all that the separated food waste won't be simply reunited with everything else we throw away immediately after collection. It is frequently reported in the national media that it is a quite common practice for differing refuse that has been sorted by UK householders to be simply combined as one for onward transport to a distant cheap land fill site. So where will this carefully sorted Bournemouth food waste be going and what is the useful purpose?[/p][/quote]http://www.bournemou th.gov.uk/Environmen t/RecyclingWaste/Rec ycling-Collection-Fo od-Waste/Food-Waste- Collections.aspx " If you live in a house, you will receive: A twelve litre collection container for outside the property which fits in your little bin or can stand alone, A five litre food caddy for the kitchen, Compostable liners and An information pack." So unfortunately that means people will actually need to spend some time reading something to be educated. Which as a lot of the comments on here have proved, the people of Bournemouth are far too busy to be inconvenienced by this[/p][/quote]I think it is safe to say 'to be educated' into accepting something questionable which most people clearly don't want. It all starts to sound rather sinister, the old question of public servants, or would be masters? muscliffman
  • Score: 2

3:02pm Fri 3 Jan 14

woby_tide says...

muscliffman wrote:
woby_tide wrote:
muscliffman wrote:
It would be helpful if the Council would fully explain (in plain words) what this will actually achieve, not least to include an absolute guarantee to us all that the separated food waste won't be simply reunited with everything else we throw away immediately after collection. It is frequently reported in the national media that it is a quite common practice for differing refuse that has been sorted by UK householders to be simply combined as one for onward transport to a distant cheap land fill site.

So where will this carefully sorted Bournemouth food waste be going and what is the useful purpose?
http://www.bournemou


th.gov.uk/Environmen


t/RecyclingWaste/Rec


ycling-Collection-Fo


od-Waste/Food-Waste-


Collections.aspx

" If you live in a house, you will receive:

A twelve litre collection container for outside the property which fits in your little bin or can stand alone,
A five litre food caddy for the kitchen,
Compostable liners and
An information pack."

So unfortunately that means people will actually need to spend some time reading something to be educated. Which as a lot of the comments on here have proved, the people of Bournemouth are far too busy to be inconvenienced by this
I think it is safe to say 'to be educated' into accepting something questionable which most people clearly don't want. It all starts to sound rather sinister, the old question of public servants, or would be masters?
I suppose "most people clearly didn't want" to move from chucking black bin liners out on the street every week so it could all go to landfill. Sometimes though the alternative might just be the better option over the selfishness of others
[quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]woby_tide[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: It would be helpful if the Council would fully explain (in plain words) what this will actually achieve, not least to include an absolute guarantee to us all that the separated food waste won't be simply reunited with everything else we throw away immediately after collection. It is frequently reported in the national media that it is a quite common practice for differing refuse that has been sorted by UK householders to be simply combined as one for onward transport to a distant cheap land fill site. So where will this carefully sorted Bournemouth food waste be going and what is the useful purpose?[/p][/quote]http://www.bournemou th.gov.uk/Environmen t/RecyclingWaste/Rec ycling-Collection-Fo od-Waste/Food-Waste- Collections.aspx " If you live in a house, you will receive: A twelve litre collection container for outside the property which fits in your little bin or can stand alone, A five litre food caddy for the kitchen, Compostable liners and An information pack." So unfortunately that means people will actually need to spend some time reading something to be educated. Which as a lot of the comments on here have proved, the people of Bournemouth are far too busy to be inconvenienced by this[/p][/quote]I think it is safe to say 'to be educated' into accepting something questionable which most people clearly don't want. It all starts to sound rather sinister, the old question of public servants, or would be masters?[/p][/quote]I suppose "most people clearly didn't want" to move from chucking black bin liners out on the street every week so it could all go to landfill. Sometimes though the alternative might just be the better option over the selfishness of others woby_tide
  • Score: -1

3:47pm Fri 3 Jan 14

foggy1965 says...

food waste bins are a waste of time, we will not use ours, and the rate the council keeps chucking more bins at us, and in my opinion just to keep some little jobsworth in employment.... but they will make a nice poo bin for picking up after the dog? and it is after all waste food.
food waste bins are a waste of time, we will not use ours, and the rate the council keeps chucking more bins at us, and in my opinion just to keep some little jobsworth in employment.... but they will make a nice poo bin for picking up after the dog? and it is after all waste food. foggy1965
  • Score: 0

4:07pm Fri 3 Jan 14

Southbourne Mike says...

Working with the waste industry I think it's a great idea. I see how this waste is now being used on a national scale and it's all for the greater good. I pity those on here that are so small minded that a little extra effort is deemed to great a task for them. In the meantime though these same people are happy to let thier pets **** everywhere!
Working with the waste industry I think it's a great idea. I see how this waste is now being used on a national scale and it's all for the greater good. I pity those on here that are so small minded that a little extra effort is deemed to great a task for them. In the meantime though these same people are happy to let thier pets **** everywhere! Southbourne Mike
  • Score: 4

4:33pm Fri 3 Jan 14

muscliffman says...

woby_tide wrote:
muscliffman wrote:
woby_tide wrote:
muscliffman wrote:
It would be helpful if the Council would fully explain (in plain words) what this will actually achieve, not least to include an absolute guarantee to us all that the separated food waste won't be simply reunited with everything else we throw away immediately after collection. It is frequently reported in the national media that it is a quite common practice for differing refuse that has been sorted by UK householders to be simply combined as one for onward transport to a distant cheap land fill site.

So where will this carefully sorted Bournemouth food waste be going and what is the useful purpose?
http://www.bournemou



th.gov.uk/Environmen



t/RecyclingWaste/Rec



ycling-Collection-Fo



od-Waste/Food-Waste-



Collections.aspx

" If you live in a house, you will receive:

A twelve litre collection container for outside the property which fits in your little bin or can stand alone,
A five litre food caddy for the kitchen,
Compostable liners and
An information pack."

So unfortunately that means people will actually need to spend some time reading something to be educated. Which as a lot of the comments on here have proved, the people of Bournemouth are far too busy to be inconvenienced by this
I think it is safe to say 'to be educated' into accepting something questionable which most people clearly don't want. It all starts to sound rather sinister, the old question of public servants, or would be masters?
I suppose "most people clearly didn't want" to move from chucking black bin liners out on the street every week so it could all go to landfill. Sometimes though the alternative might just be the better option over the selfishness of others
But we never have 'chucked black bin liners out on the street' at least here in Bournemouth. We used to have one bin collected and emptied weekly, then we were 'educated' into having a second recycle bin - delivered with a secret 'educational' micro chip device in it and accompanied by plenty of glossy 'green' recycle spin.

We subsequntly read and heard that in many cases in the UK all this refuse sorting effort was a complete waste of people's time, as everything from both bins often ended up in landfill just as it always had. In fact locally it was even reported that both the recycle and non-recycle bins were seen being loaded into the back of the same refuse truck, on the same round!

With respect all this refuse recycling mantra all seems to be coming from people with rather too much time on their hands.
[quote][p][bold]woby_tide[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]woby_tide[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: It would be helpful if the Council would fully explain (in plain words) what this will actually achieve, not least to include an absolute guarantee to us all that the separated food waste won't be simply reunited with everything else we throw away immediately after collection. It is frequently reported in the national media that it is a quite common practice for differing refuse that has been sorted by UK householders to be simply combined as one for onward transport to a distant cheap land fill site. So where will this carefully sorted Bournemouth food waste be going and what is the useful purpose?[/p][/quote]http://www.bournemou th.gov.uk/Environmen t/RecyclingWaste/Rec ycling-Collection-Fo od-Waste/Food-Waste- Collections.aspx " If you live in a house, you will receive: A twelve litre collection container for outside the property which fits in your little bin or can stand alone, A five litre food caddy for the kitchen, Compostable liners and An information pack." So unfortunately that means people will actually need to spend some time reading something to be educated. Which as a lot of the comments on here have proved, the people of Bournemouth are far too busy to be inconvenienced by this[/p][/quote]I think it is safe to say 'to be educated' into accepting something questionable which most people clearly don't want. It all starts to sound rather sinister, the old question of public servants, or would be masters?[/p][/quote]I suppose "most people clearly didn't want" to move from chucking black bin liners out on the street every week so it could all go to landfill. Sometimes though the alternative might just be the better option over the selfishness of others[/p][/quote]But we never have 'chucked black bin liners out on the street' at least here in Bournemouth. We used to have one bin collected and emptied weekly, then we were 'educated' into having a second recycle bin - delivered with a secret 'educational' micro chip device in it and accompanied by plenty of glossy 'green' recycle spin. We subsequntly read and heard that in many cases in the UK all this refuse sorting effort was a complete waste of people's time, as everything from both bins often ended up in landfill just as it always had. In fact locally it was even reported that both the recycle and non-recycle bins were seen being loaded into the back of the same refuse truck, on the same round! With respect all this refuse recycling mantra all seems to be coming from people with rather too much time on their hands. muscliffman
  • Score: 1

4:52pm Fri 3 Jan 14

Lee Hancox says...

Anybody doubting the worthiness of these New food containers would do well to look into In-Vessel Composting or Anaerobic Digesters. Both provide an excellent sustainable product, where In-Vessel Composting provides a usable composting material that can be resold and diverted away from Landfill sites. Anaerobic Digesters such as Eco Sustainable Solutions plant based at Piddlehinton can process 10's of thousands of tonnes of waste food product and produce methane. The methane from this process is then used to power generators that feed back into the National grid thus providing sustainable energy solutions for all.

All for a little extra effort at the source of the waste , our households.
Anybody doubting the worthiness of these New food containers would do well to look into In-Vessel Composting or Anaerobic Digesters. Both provide an excellent sustainable product, where In-Vessel Composting provides a usable composting material that can be resold and diverted away from Landfill sites. Anaerobic Digesters such as Eco Sustainable Solutions plant based at Piddlehinton can process 10's of thousands of tonnes of waste food product and produce methane. The methane from this process is then used to power generators that feed back into the National grid thus providing sustainable energy solutions for all. All for a little extra effort at the source of the waste , our households. Lee Hancox
  • Score: 1

7:05pm Fri 3 Jan 14

blackdog1 says...

Another waste of time from the Eco freaks! All I want is one bin emptied weekly!
Another waste of time from the Eco freaks! All I want is one bin emptied weekly! blackdog1
  • Score: 0

9:58pm Fri 3 Jan 14

O'Reilly says...

DemonDiva wrote:
I used to work in the boy grammar school kitchen many years ago, and we had what was then called "the pig bin". All the leftovers went into that bin, and it was emptied weekly.
The stench on warmer days was unbelievable, and when the entire bin was just heaving with maggots was totally indescribable.
Same as this, just on a larger scale.
Ordinary bins will heave with maggots on a hot day if unwrapped food waste is in them; it is just one of those things..... wrapping food waste and using bin-powder helped to alleviate the problem.
[quote][p][bold]DemonDiva[/bold] wrote: I used to work in the boy grammar school kitchen many years ago, and we had what was then called "the pig bin". All the leftovers went into that bin, and it was emptied weekly. The stench on warmer days was unbelievable, and when the entire bin was just heaving with maggots was totally indescribable. Same as this, just on a larger scale.[/p][/quote]Ordinary bins will heave with maggots on a hot day if unwrapped food waste is in them; it is just one of those things..... wrapping food waste and using bin-powder helped to alleviate the problem. O'Reilly
  • Score: 3

10:02pm Fri 3 Jan 14

O'Reilly says...

foggy1965 wrote:
food waste bins are a waste of time, we will not use ours, and the rate the council keeps chucking more bins at us, and in my opinion just to keep some little jobsworth in employment.... but they will make a nice poo bin for picking up after the dog? and it is after all waste food.
If you think it is bad in this area have a thought for these people.....

http://www.dailymail
.co.uk/news/article-
1310430/Councils-new
-FIVE-bin-waste-sche
me-prompts-6-000-com
plaints-day.html
[quote][p][bold]foggy1965[/bold] wrote: food waste bins are a waste of time, we will not use ours, and the rate the council keeps chucking more bins at us, and in my opinion just to keep some little jobsworth in employment.... but they will make a nice poo bin for picking up after the dog? and it is after all waste food.[/p][/quote]If you think it is bad in this area have a thought for these people..... http://www.dailymail .co.uk/news/article- 1310430/Councils-new -FIVE-bin-waste-sche me-prompts-6-000-com plaints-day.html O'Reilly
  • Score: -2

11:55pm Fri 3 Jan 14

rozmister says...

blackdog1 wrote:
Another waste of time from the Eco freaks! All I want is one bin emptied weekly!
Good well how about you can pay a bit extra on your council tax then and have just one? Separating your recyclable waste from your landfill waste saves money in costs and means the service can still be run to a good standard despite massive central government cuts. If you're too lazy to do your bit pay more council tax but I don't see why all other council taxpayers, myself included, should have to carry you and your lack of willingness to pull your finger out!
[quote][p][bold]blackdog1[/bold] wrote: Another waste of time from the Eco freaks! All I want is one bin emptied weekly![/p][/quote]Good well how about you can pay a bit extra on your council tax then and have just one? Separating your recyclable waste from your landfill waste saves money in costs and means the service can still be run to a good standard despite massive central government cuts. If you're too lazy to do your bit pay more council tax but I don't see why all other council taxpayers, myself included, should have to carry you and your lack of willingness to pull your finger out! rozmister
  • Score: 2

7:41am Sat 4 Jan 14

KarenMM says...

We have them in Christchurch and they work well. And it's not just for unwanted food, you can put vegetable peelings in, egg shells, bones. Was brill for disposing of the turkey bones at Christmas. I clean mine every week. It stops my main bin in kitchen having to be emptied so often and therefore reduces smells.
We have them in Christchurch and they work well. And it's not just for unwanted food, you can put vegetable peelings in, egg shells, bones. Was brill for disposing of the turkey bones at Christmas. I clean mine every week. It stops my main bin in kitchen having to be emptied so often and therefore reduces smells. KarenMM
  • Score: 1

8:15am Sat 4 Jan 14

nosuchluck54 says...

muscliffman wrote:
woby_tide wrote:
muscliffman wrote:
woby_tide wrote:
muscliffman wrote:
It would be helpful if the Council would fully explain (in plain words) what this will actually achieve, not least to include an absolute guarantee to us all that the separated food waste won't be simply reunited with everything else we throw away immediately after collection. It is frequently reported in the national media that it is a quite common practice for differing refuse that has been sorted by UK householders to be simply combined as one for onward transport to a distant cheap land fill site.

So where will this carefully sorted Bournemouth food waste be going and what is the useful purpose?
http://www.bournemou




th.gov.uk/Environmen




t/RecyclingWaste/Rec




ycling-Collection-Fo




od-Waste/Food-Waste-




Collections.aspx

" If you live in a house, you will receive:

A twelve litre collection container for outside the property which fits in your little bin or can stand alone,
A five litre food caddy for the kitchen,
Compostable liners and
An information pack."

So unfortunately that means people will actually need to spend some time reading something to be educated. Which as a lot of the comments on here have proved, the people of Bournemouth are far too busy to be inconvenienced by this
I think it is safe to say 'to be educated' into accepting something questionable which most people clearly don't want. It all starts to sound rather sinister, the old question of public servants, or would be masters?
I suppose "most people clearly didn't want" to move from chucking black bin liners out on the street every week so it could all go to landfill. Sometimes though the alternative might just be the better option over the selfishness of others
But we never have 'chucked black bin liners out on the street' at least here in Bournemouth. We used to have one bin collected and emptied weekly, then we were 'educated' into having a second recycle bin - delivered with a secret 'educational' micro chip device in it and accompanied by plenty of glossy 'green' recycle spin.

We subsequntly read and heard that in many cases in the UK all this refuse sorting effort was a complete waste of people's time, as everything from both bins often ended up in landfill just as it always had. In fact locally it was even reported that both the recycle and non-recycle bins were seen being loaded into the back of the same refuse truck, on the same round!

With respect all this refuse recycling mantra all seems to be coming from people with rather too much time on their hands.
Too much time on their hands ? Pot and Black spring to mind. However this idea works well in other parts of the country but unfortunately unless some of the Bournemouth residents dump the uncooperative attitude that exists these worth while projects will struggle until the benefits sink in to their small minds
[quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]woby_tide[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]woby_tide[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: It would be helpful if the Council would fully explain (in plain words) what this will actually achieve, not least to include an absolute guarantee to us all that the separated food waste won't be simply reunited with everything else we throw away immediately after collection. It is frequently reported in the national media that it is a quite common practice for differing refuse that has been sorted by UK householders to be simply combined as one for onward transport to a distant cheap land fill site. So where will this carefully sorted Bournemouth food waste be going and what is the useful purpose?[/p][/quote]http://www.bournemou th.gov.uk/Environmen t/RecyclingWaste/Rec ycling-Collection-Fo od-Waste/Food-Waste- Collections.aspx " If you live in a house, you will receive: A twelve litre collection container for outside the property which fits in your little bin or can stand alone, A five litre food caddy for the kitchen, Compostable liners and An information pack." So unfortunately that means people will actually need to spend some time reading something to be educated. Which as a lot of the comments on here have proved, the people of Bournemouth are far too busy to be inconvenienced by this[/p][/quote]I think it is safe to say 'to be educated' into accepting something questionable which most people clearly don't want. It all starts to sound rather sinister, the old question of public servants, or would be masters?[/p][/quote]I suppose "most people clearly didn't want" to move from chucking black bin liners out on the street every week so it could all go to landfill. Sometimes though the alternative might just be the better option over the selfishness of others[/p][/quote]But we never have 'chucked black bin liners out on the street' at least here in Bournemouth. We used to have one bin collected and emptied weekly, then we were 'educated' into having a second recycle bin - delivered with a secret 'educational' micro chip device in it and accompanied by plenty of glossy 'green' recycle spin. We subsequntly read and heard that in many cases in the UK all this refuse sorting effort was a complete waste of people's time, as everything from both bins often ended up in landfill just as it always had. In fact locally it was even reported that both the recycle and non-recycle bins were seen being loaded into the back of the same refuse truck, on the same round! With respect all this refuse recycling mantra all seems to be coming from people with rather too much time on their hands.[/p][/quote]Too much time on their hands ? Pot and Black spring to mind. However this idea works well in other parts of the country but unfortunately unless some of the Bournemouth residents dump the uncooperative attitude that exists these worth while projects will struggle until the benefits sink in to their small minds nosuchluck54
  • Score: 1

9:31am Sat 4 Jan 14

Teddy 1 says...

I dont understand the cost arguement. You have new bins yo pay for, leaflets, distribution costs, collection costs etc. How can the costs be reduced? Think this would be an interesting investigation for the echo reporters! They would need to look behind the figures supplied and ssk awkward questions though not just the pr bumph given out in the councils glossy leaflets!
I dont understand the cost arguement. You have new bins yo pay for, leaflets, distribution costs, collection costs etc. How can the costs be reduced? Think this would be an interesting investigation for the echo reporters! They would need to look behind the figures supplied and ssk awkward questions though not just the pr bumph given out in the councils glossy leaflets! Teddy 1
  • Score: 3

1:00pm Sat 4 Jan 14

rozmister says...

Teddy 1 wrote:
I dont understand the cost arguement. You have new bins yo pay for, leaflets, distribution costs, collection costs etc. How can the costs be reduced? Think this would be an interesting investigation for the echo reporters! They would need to look behind the figures supplied and ssk awkward questions though not just the pr bumph given out in the councils glossy leaflets!
Did you do research before you commented? The new bins/'leaflets/distr
ibution/etc is all funded by the DCLG (Department for Communities & Local Government) so it's not come out of the council taxpayer's pocket. So the cost of recycling the food waste is significantly less which uses less of the council tax pot but the funding to introduce it has come from central government.
[quote][p][bold]Teddy 1[/bold] wrote: I dont understand the cost arguement. You have new bins yo pay for, leaflets, distribution costs, collection costs etc. How can the costs be reduced? Think this would be an interesting investigation for the echo reporters! They would need to look behind the figures supplied and ssk awkward questions though not just the pr bumph given out in the councils glossy leaflets![/p][/quote]Did you do research before you commented? The new bins/'leaflets/distr ibution/etc is all funded by the DCLG (Department for Communities & Local Government) so it's not come out of the council taxpayer's pocket. So the cost of recycling the food waste is significantly less which uses less of the council tax pot but the funding to introduce it has come from central government. rozmister
  • Score: -3

10:49pm Sat 4 Jan 14

Teddy 1 says...

rozmister wrote:
Teddy 1 wrote:
I dont understand the cost arguement. You have new bins yo pay for, leaflets, distribution costs, collection costs etc. How can the costs be reduced? Think this would be an interesting investigation for the echo reporters! They would need to look behind the figures supplied and ssk awkward questions though not just the pr bumph given out in the councils glossy leaflets!
Did you do research before you commented? The new bins/'leaflets/distr

ibution/etc is all funded by the DCLG (Department for Communities & Local Government) so it's not come out of the council taxpayer's pocket. So the cost of recycling the food waste is significantly less which uses less of the council tax pot but the funding to introduce it has come from central government.
Thats okay then because my taxes and everyone elses taxes dont go to fund central government initiatives, only local government. Doh!! (Im being sarcastic btw)
[quote][p][bold]rozmister[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Teddy 1[/bold] wrote: I dont understand the cost arguement. You have new bins yo pay for, leaflets, distribution costs, collection costs etc. How can the costs be reduced? Think this would be an interesting investigation for the echo reporters! They would need to look behind the figures supplied and ssk awkward questions though not just the pr bumph given out in the councils glossy leaflets![/p][/quote]Did you do research before you commented? The new bins/'leaflets/distr ibution/etc is all funded by the DCLG (Department for Communities & Local Government) so it's not come out of the council taxpayer's pocket. So the cost of recycling the food waste is significantly less which uses less of the council tax pot but the funding to introduce it has come from central government.[/p][/quote]Thats okay then because my taxes and everyone elses taxes dont go to fund central government initiatives, only local government. Doh!! (Im being sarcastic btw) Teddy 1
  • Score: 2

11:09pm Sat 4 Jan 14

rozmister says...

Teddy 1 wrote:
rozmister wrote:
Teddy 1 wrote:
I dont understand the cost arguement. You have new bins yo pay for, leaflets, distribution costs, collection costs etc. How can the costs be reduced? Think this would be an interesting investigation for the echo reporters! They would need to look behind the figures supplied and ssk awkward questions though not just the pr bumph given out in the councils glossy leaflets!
Did you do research before you commented? The new bins/'leaflets/distr


ibution/etc is all funded by the DCLG (Department for Communities & Local Government) so it's not come out of the council taxpayer's pocket. So the cost of recycling the food waste is significantly less which uses less of the council tax pot but the funding to introduce it has come from central government.
Thats okay then because my taxes and everyone elses taxes dont go to fund central government initiatives, only local government. Doh!! (Im being sarcastic btw)
The pot of central government money is specifically for this purpose, something which in the long run means you can still receive the same services from your council despite them losing a huge whack of their central government funding. Would you prefer your bin collections reduced to fortnightly instead to reflect the loss of income?
[quote][p][bold]Teddy 1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]rozmister[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Teddy 1[/bold] wrote: I dont understand the cost arguement. You have new bins yo pay for, leaflets, distribution costs, collection costs etc. How can the costs be reduced? Think this would be an interesting investigation for the echo reporters! They would need to look behind the figures supplied and ssk awkward questions though not just the pr bumph given out in the councils glossy leaflets![/p][/quote]Did you do research before you commented? The new bins/'leaflets/distr ibution/etc is all funded by the DCLG (Department for Communities & Local Government) so it's not come out of the council taxpayer's pocket. So the cost of recycling the food waste is significantly less which uses less of the council tax pot but the funding to introduce it has come from central government.[/p][/quote]Thats okay then because my taxes and everyone elses taxes dont go to fund central government initiatives, only local government. Doh!! (Im being sarcastic btw)[/p][/quote]The pot of central government money is specifically for this purpose, something which in the long run means you can still receive the same services from your council despite them losing a huge whack of their central government funding. Would you prefer your bin collections reduced to fortnightly instead to reflect the loss of income? rozmister
  • Score: -4

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