“People are living like it’s the Third World” - rising demand for Bournemouth foodbanks as more families struggle

Bournemouth Echo: ON THE RISE: Bournemouth foodbank manager Debbie Bramley in the stock room ON THE RISE: Bournemouth foodbank manager Debbie Bramley in the stock room

FOR some desperate families across Bournemouth and Poole this Christmas, dinner came in a cardboard box.

Foodbank and soup kitchen organisers say demand for their help is continuing to soar as more and more people struggle to make ends meet.

Last month charity The Trussell Trust said the number of people using its 400 foodbanks nationally had trebled over the previous six months to 350,000, compared with the same period last year.

Debbie Bramley, who runs Bournemouth Foodbank in Charminster, said they were currently feeding around 250 families a week.

Each is only allowed to use the service three times over six months, and a food parcel only lasts about three days.

“The numbers are definitely up since the welfare reforms in April, people are finding it really hard to pay the bills and look after their families,” she said.

“We have all sorts of people from homeless to working families, many of whom have seen their benefits cut and can’t manage on what they are earning.

“People have to be referred to use the food bank and it is only for use in a crisis, not to sustain them long term. But they come back in and say the service saved their lives, not just with the food but by providing advice and someone to talk to.”

Claire Matthews, whose Hope for Food organisation serves up hot meals to hungry people in Bournemouth two nights a week, said: “We are getting between 75 to 85 people per night. The numbers have been growing and growing since we started in February.”

On Christmas Eve, Dorset Hall of Fame award-winner Miss Matthews and her team organised a festive dinner for the homeless and hungry at Richmond Hill St Andrew’s United Reformed Church.

Despite the stereotype of a soup kitchen user, she said only about 30 per cent of their visitors were homeless.

“Most have homes, and some have part time jobs but still have to come here to eat,” she said.

“I don’t understand how in this century people are living like it’s the Third World, and having to queue up in the rain for food.”

‘Welfare reforms exacerbate problem’

MANY foodbank and soup kitchen users told the Daily Echo that welfare reforms introduced since April had exacerbated their problems.

From April 1 council tax benefit funding was reduced by 10 per cent nationally, and in July a wide ranging benefits cap was introduced for the unemployed, restricting weekly income to a maximum of £500 per week for couples, or £350 per week for single people.

The cap included housing benefit payments, which are also cut by up to 25 per cent by the ‘bedroom tax’ where people in social housing have unused bedrooms.

Also in April the disability living allowance was replaced with the personal independence payment, with a more demanding assessment process. Six means-tested benefits, including housing, jobseekers allowance and income support, will eventually be combined into universal credit.

The government has said its aims are to simplify the system and reduce errors and fraudulent claims.

More help is needed

A RENEWED appeal has gone out for people to support local food charities with donations and time.

Volunteers from Hope for Food have been doing their own fundraising.

Elisa Cole, 34, is attempting a sponsored exercise and healthy eating challenge to help get the soup kitchen users a proper shelter.

Mrs Cole, who lives in Wallisdown with her husband and three children, said: “I want to raise as much money towards a proper shelter as possible, and I want to be healthy for my kids.

“At the moment I am more than 18 stone so there is a long way to go, but I have stuck with it so far. I have to be fit enough for the Bournemouth Bay Run next year.”

Visit Elisa and Paul’s Fitness Challenge for Charity on Facebook for more information, and email info@hopeforfood.org .uk to help out in other ways.

Bournemouth Foodbank gives away 1.5 to 2 tonnes of food a week, much of which is donated by schools and churches.

Volunteers spend around £200 a week from collections on extra items.

Organiser Debbie Bramley said despite “tremendous” support from supermarkets, businesses and local Rotary clubs, it was still a struggle to keep up with demand.

“We get a lot of certain items, particularly cereal, tea and tins of beans. We really don’t need any more beans,” she said.

“But there is a shortage of tinned fish, meat, fruit and vegetables, UHT milk, coffee and toiletries.

“We are also looking for a larger venue at the moment, ideally with an area for people to sit and chat.”

Call 01202 900979 to donate, or food can be dropped off at Bournemouth Foodbank in St Leonard’s Road, or at Trussell Trust shops in Boscombe and Winton.

In a bid to boost supplies, Medi Bernard, Bournemouth Council’s head of libraries, has arranged for all of the town’s libraries to be food collection points.

Since the government abolished crisis loans in April, the council has introduced a £1 million Local Welfare Assistance Fund, with an extra £500,000 earmarked for support during the gradual roll-out of universal credit.

Applications to the fund can be made at bournemouth.gov.uk/welfare

Soup kitchens are lifelines

FORMER IT manager James has gone from a high-income, high pressure career to using the Hope for Food in a matter of months.

The 28-year-old said he had never known such places existed until losing his job forced him to start visiting the soup kitchen twice a week back in August.

Once a strategic partnership manager in London, he is now working part-time and dependent on housing benefit and jobseekers’ allowance payments.

“Bournemouth is not a cheap place to live, and after I have paid the rent remaining after housing benefit, and my travel costs for work and interviews, there isn’t enough left to buy food,” he said.

“It has been quite a shock. But Hope for Food is great for giving people a bit of independence so they can get their lives back on track.”

LOUIS Dammers, pictured, was a fork lift truck driver for 22 years until he lost his job after being diagnosed with depression.

He now relies on benefits to pay his rent, bills, food and to contribute to the upkeep of his three youngsters who live in Hampshire with their mum.

The 48-year-old, who was born in Bournemouth, described the Hope for Food soup kitchen as a lifeline after his benefits were cut.

“I have been using the service since April and it has been a real lifeline,” he said.

“Like many others here I can’t afford to live on the money I am getting any more. I have lost about £45 a week.”

He said the most severe cut was to his housing benefit, which he now has to top up.

“If it wasn’t for the soup kitchen the homeless and people in my position would be in real trouble,” he added.

POOLE resident Mike lost his job as a business to business broker 18 months ago and initially thought he could enjoy a short holiday before snapping up a new job.

However the 45-year-old was quickly left struggling to pay his bills as once-numerous job offers dried up.

He said he had never imagined using Bournemouth Foodbank, and might even have turned his nose up at the idea, but doing so had been an eye-opening experience.

“They say you aren’t more than a couple of paycheques away from the streets,” he said.

“It all starts getting on top of you and it happens very quickly. And you get depressed and don’t want to talk to people about it.

“People don’t seem to realise this happens to people who work really hard.”

Mike, who got a new job this month, said when his first paycheque comes through he is going to have a beer to celebrate, and take a parcel of food round to the food bank in thanks.

Comments (87)

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7:36am Mon 30 Dec 13

arthur1948 says...

Welcome to caring Britain under the Tories .....rob the poor and give to the rich.
Welcome to caring Britain under the Tories .....rob the poor and give to the rich. arthur1948

8:19am Mon 30 Dec 13

seakayaker says...

arthur1948 wrote:
Welcome to caring Britain under the Tories .....rob the poor and give to the rich.
Hate to blind you with facts but under this coalition government those on lower pay have had their net pay increased as the starting point for paying tax has risen. Under Labour a person working 40 hours a week on minimum wage would have had to pay tax on everything he earned after 18 hours; now it is on only that earned after 28 hours and that is set to rise still further. You see Labour just talk about caring but the reality is they want to keep the poor in their place as vote fodder
[quote][p][bold]arthur1948[/bold] wrote: Welcome to caring Britain under the Tories .....rob the poor and give to the rich.[/p][/quote]Hate to blind you with facts but under this coalition government those on lower pay have had their net pay increased as the starting point for paying tax has risen. Under Labour a person working 40 hours a week on minimum wage would have had to pay tax on everything he earned after 18 hours; now it is on only that earned after 28 hours and that is set to rise still further. You see Labour just talk about caring but the reality is they want to keep the poor in their place as vote fodder seakayaker

8:54am Mon 30 Dec 13

politicaltrainspotter says...

And to cap it off Iain Duncan Smith and Ester Mcvey walked out of the foodbank debate in the HOC and IDS has refused to meet the CEO and senior staff of the Trussell Trust.

And talking to a member of staff from the Trussell Staff it was not just those on benefits but working people.

No point bashing those on benefits.For if you beleive you got a job for life and good health then think again as life has a cruel way of changing that and you might need that one day.

While governments cut the true spirit is reflected by charities and companies like Asda and many others to assist.Yes, ordinary people and not those living in Westminster village.

On another issue can the Daily Echo ascertain if our Dorset MP's are going to accept their pay rises.Come on ask them we might see their faces arise from the trough.
And to cap it off Iain Duncan Smith and Ester Mcvey walked out of the foodbank debate in the HOC and IDS has refused to meet the CEO and senior staff of the Trussell Trust. And talking to a member of staff from the Trussell Staff it was not just those on benefits but working people. No point bashing those on benefits.For if you beleive you got a job for life and good health then think again as life has a cruel way of changing that and you might need that one day. While governments cut the true spirit is reflected by charities and companies like Asda and many others to assist.Yes, ordinary people and not those living in Westminster village. On another issue can the Daily Echo ascertain if our Dorset MP's are going to accept their pay rises.Come on ask them we might see their faces arise from the trough. politicaltrainspotter

9:09am Mon 30 Dec 13

matthew bell says...

seakayaker wrote:
arthur1948 wrote:
Welcome to caring Britain under the Tories .....rob the poor and give to the rich.
Hate to blind you with facts but under this coalition government those on lower pay have had their net pay increased as the starting point for paying tax has risen. Under Labour a person working 40 hours a week on minimum wage would have had to pay tax on everything he earned after 18 hours; now it is on only that earned after 28 hours and that is set to rise still further. You see Labour just talk about caring but the reality is they want to keep the poor in their place as vote fodder
Very true. it is simple to me that the Gov squeeze money, lots of ways, out of people so why should people with no money not turn to very simple & easy methods of getting food & social relief such as crime/alcohol & drugs?
This fact is directly related to what happens in our county.
Good charity helps people escape this trap. But the solution is to target the scum responsible for their job loss & providing drugs ex.....
1 solution is to get the food from Tesco's,Asda,sainsbu
rys & waitrose & target publicly those in the local area which refuse(bad business media scares them,even Tescos). They bin loads!!!! Then arrest & remove from dorset with a Dorset court order injunction the dealers (permanently from Dorset)
[quote][p][bold]seakayaker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]arthur1948[/bold] wrote: Welcome to caring Britain under the Tories .....rob the poor and give to the rich.[/p][/quote]Hate to blind you with facts but under this coalition government those on lower pay have had their net pay increased as the starting point for paying tax has risen. Under Labour a person working 40 hours a week on minimum wage would have had to pay tax on everything he earned after 18 hours; now it is on only that earned after 28 hours and that is set to rise still further. You see Labour just talk about caring but the reality is they want to keep the poor in their place as vote fodder[/p][/quote]Very true. it is simple to me that the Gov squeeze money, lots of ways, out of people so why should people with no money not turn to very simple & easy methods of getting food & social relief such as crime/alcohol & drugs? This fact is directly related to what happens in our county. Good charity helps people escape this trap. But the solution is to target the scum responsible for their job loss & providing drugs ex..... 1 solution is to get the food from Tesco's,Asda,sainsbu rys & waitrose & target publicly those in the local area which refuse(bad business media scares them,even Tescos). They bin loads!!!! Then arrest & remove from dorset with a Dorset court order injunction the dealers (permanently from Dorset) matthew bell

9:13am Mon 30 Dec 13

wintonCheryl says...

Ask the trussell trust how much they charge a church to set up one of their foodbanks. It costs £1500 then a further annual fee.all the food is then donated by the public. So where does all this money go??? Google them, it makes interesting reading once you scratch below the surface
Ask the trussell trust how much they charge a church to set up one of their foodbanks. It costs £1500 then a further annual fee.all the food is then donated by the public. So where does all this money go??? Google them, it makes interesting reading once you scratch below the surface wintonCheryl

9:15am Mon 30 Dec 13

Dorset Logic says...

arthur1948 wrote:
Welcome to caring Britain under the Tories .....rob the poor and give to the rich.
I seem to remember these food banks existing for quite a while now - including under labour, but don't let the facts worry you. Politicians of any party are not going to save anyone.
[quote][p][bold]arthur1948[/bold] wrote: Welcome to caring Britain under the Tories .....rob the poor and give to the rich.[/p][/quote]I seem to remember these food banks existing for quite a while now - including under labour, but don't let the facts worry you. Politicians of any party are not going to save anyone. Dorset Logic

9:26am Mon 30 Dec 13

BIGTONE says...

But laughing Ian Duncan Smith says there is no problem
But laughing Ian Duncan Smith says there is no problem BIGTONE

9:34am Mon 30 Dec 13

Moro99 says...

And in other news childhood obesity is up in Bournemouth
And in other news childhood obesity is up in Bournemouth Moro99

9:36am Mon 30 Dec 13

pete woodley says...

wintonCheryl wrote:
Ask the trussell trust how much they charge a church to set up one of their foodbanks. It costs £1500 then a further annual fee.all the food is then donated by the public. So where does all this money go??? Google them, it makes interesting reading once you scratch below the surface
Glad you brought this up i have been seeking info for ages as have heard a lot of rumours re who owns the wessex building,what is the rent,and who gets wages..
[quote][p][bold]wintonCheryl[/bold] wrote: Ask the trussell trust how much they charge a church to set up one of their foodbanks. It costs £1500 then a further annual fee.all the food is then donated by the public. So where does all this money go??? Google them, it makes interesting reading once you scratch below the surface[/p][/quote]Glad you brought this up i have been seeking info for ages as have heard a lot of rumours re who owns the wessex building,what is the rent,and who gets wages.. pete woodley

9:40am Mon 30 Dec 13

Hessenford says...

seakayaker wrote:
arthur1948 wrote:
Welcome to caring Britain under the Tories .....rob the poor and give to the rich.
Hate to blind you with facts but under this coalition government those on lower pay have had their net pay increased as the starting point for paying tax has risen. Under Labour a person working 40 hours a week on minimum wage would have had to pay tax on everything he earned after 18 hours; now it is on only that earned after 28 hours and that is set to rise still further. You see Labour just talk about caring but the reality is they want to keep the poor in their place as vote fodder
True the tax threshold has increased but is being able to keep everything earned up to 28 hours work a week anything to cheer about when this government is giving billions to countries who have their own nuclear programme and rockets into space.
The tax threshold rises go no where near paying for the increases for gas and electric rises or food bill rises, so not much to cheer about really.
Come April the tax threshold rises to £10.000, still a long way under the estimated £26,000 average wage.
[quote][p][bold]seakayaker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]arthur1948[/bold] wrote: Welcome to caring Britain under the Tories .....rob the poor and give to the rich.[/p][/quote]Hate to blind you with facts but under this coalition government those on lower pay have had their net pay increased as the starting point for paying tax has risen. Under Labour a person working 40 hours a week on minimum wage would have had to pay tax on everything he earned after 18 hours; now it is on only that earned after 28 hours and that is set to rise still further. You see Labour just talk about caring but the reality is they want to keep the poor in their place as vote fodder[/p][/quote]True the tax threshold has increased but is being able to keep everything earned up to 28 hours work a week anything to cheer about when this government is giving billions to countries who have their own nuclear programme and rockets into space. The tax threshold rises go no where near paying for the increases for gas and electric rises or food bill rises, so not much to cheer about really. Come April the tax threshold rises to £10.000, still a long way under the estimated £26,000 average wage. Hessenford

9:51am Mon 30 Dec 13

High Treason says...

I wonder how many arrive at the food bank in their cars. By today's standards they may be classed as poor but in reality they are consumer rich with mobile phones, Sky/Virgin subscriptions and running a car etc.
I wonder how many arrive at the food bank in their cars. By today's standards they may be classed as poor but in reality they are consumer rich with mobile phones, Sky/Virgin subscriptions and running a car etc. High Treason

10:06am Mon 30 Dec 13

skydriver says...

And still this country gives money away in overseas aid. Just for the record I have sent this article to David Cameron although I doubt I will get a reply .
And still this country gives money away in overseas aid. Just for the record I have sent this article to David Cameron although I doubt I will get a reply . skydriver

10:17am Mon 30 Dec 13

PokesdownMark says...

Several new food banks are set up every week in the UK, the are in vogue with a certain brand of Christian sect. I find it odd then that the larger food bank organisations churn out press releases about the numbers of people they serve because they themselves are creating the demand in the first place. I do not doubt that some small number of very needy people benefit. But the organisations press offices talk about hundreds of thousands leading to nonsense headlines about third world Britain. Do not be fooled by those jumping on this most ideological theocratic bandwagon as proof of their political agenda and bias.
Several new food banks are set up every week in the UK, the are in vogue with a certain brand of Christian sect. I find it odd then that the larger food bank organisations churn out press releases about the numbers of people they serve because they themselves are creating the demand in the first place. I do not doubt that some small number of very needy people benefit. But the organisations press offices talk about hundreds of thousands leading to nonsense headlines about third world Britain. Do not be fooled by those jumping on this most ideological theocratic bandwagon as proof of their political agenda and bias. PokesdownMark

10:20am Mon 30 Dec 13

BournemouthMum says...

Those who fare worse in this country are single people - whether in work or unemployed. Those will kids will never suffer hardship as benefits are paid in abundance for producing children - i.e. child benefit, housing benefit and tax credits and the council has a duty to provide accommodation. I feel genuinely sorry for single unemployed people who get £70 a week to live on. This is supplosed to pay for their food, utilities, trips to the Jobcentre and phone callss to apply for jobs. If families with children are going without food when they are paid ample benefits for the children then all I can say is they must be misappropriating funds that are meant to be spent on their children.

Thumbs down my comment if you like - but it's true.
Those who fare worse in this country are single people - whether in work or unemployed. Those will kids will never suffer hardship as benefits are paid in abundance for producing children - i.e. child benefit, housing benefit and tax credits and the council has a duty to provide accommodation. I feel genuinely sorry for single unemployed people who get £70 a week to live on. This is supplosed to pay for their food, utilities, trips to the Jobcentre and phone callss to apply for jobs. If families with children are going without food when they are paid ample benefits for the children then all I can say is they must be misappropriating funds that are meant to be spent on their children. Thumbs down my comment if you like - but it's true. BournemouthMum

10:25am Mon 30 Dec 13

BournemouthMum says...

PokesdownMark wrote:
Several new food banks are set up every week in the UK, the are in vogue with a certain brand of Christian sect. I find it odd then that the larger food bank organisations churn out press releases about the numbers of people they serve because they themselves are creating the demand in the first place. I do not doubt that some small number of very needy people benefit. But the organisations press offices talk about hundreds of thousands leading to nonsense headlines about third world Britain. Do not be fooled by those jumping on this most ideological theocratic bandwagon as proof of their political agenda and bias.
Well said. Your comment may prove unpopular but it's very true. Call me a cynic, but people are making money out of these charities.
[quote][p][bold]PokesdownMark[/bold] wrote: Several new food banks are set up every week in the UK, the are in vogue with a certain brand of Christian sect. I find it odd then that the larger food bank organisations churn out press releases about the numbers of people they serve because they themselves are creating the demand in the first place. I do not doubt that some small number of very needy people benefit. But the organisations press offices talk about hundreds of thousands leading to nonsense headlines about third world Britain. Do not be fooled by those jumping on this most ideological theocratic bandwagon as proof of their political agenda and bias.[/p][/quote]Well said. Your comment may prove unpopular but it's very true. Call me a cynic, but people are making money out of these charities. BournemouthMum

10:43am Mon 30 Dec 13

roxit78 says...

Back in the 80s my father was unemployed for 2 years, and tells me that he did not claim benefits, but actually worked self employed as a painter decorator to keep food on our table, and it was actually the first time we had an overseas holiday.

I did not have the best trainers at school (although today that would be an iPad and Diesel jeans) but it didn't do me any harm, since I grew up to appreciate the value of nice things and do have the iPad and Diesel jeans at my own expense.

I could really sympathise with those who are destitute but I would ask - what have they done to remedy themselves out of this situation? Why have we turned into a nation of expectants without any moral responsibility for our own actions or choices.

I'm pretty certain that most of the foodbank users will still smoke, still drink, still drive, and still have Sky TV. They will have iPhones, iPads etc.

It's about priorities and responsibility. Until people take responsibility for their own lives, I for one would never condone the use of these foodbanks, nor benefits as a whole.
Back in the 80s my father was unemployed for 2 years, and tells me that he did not claim benefits, but actually worked self employed as a painter decorator to keep food on our table, and it was actually the first time we had an overseas holiday. I did not have the best trainers at school (although today that would be an iPad and Diesel jeans) but it didn't do me any harm, since I grew up to appreciate the value of nice things and do have the iPad and Diesel jeans at my own expense. I could really sympathise with those who are destitute but I would ask - what have they done to remedy themselves out of this situation? Why have we turned into a nation of expectants without any moral responsibility for our own actions or choices. I'm pretty certain that most of the foodbank users will still smoke, still drink, still drive, and still have Sky TV. They will have iPhones, iPads etc. It's about priorities and responsibility. Until people take responsibility for their own lives, I for one would never condone the use of these foodbanks, nor benefits as a whole. roxit78

10:55am Mon 30 Dec 13

justsayithowitis says...

roxit78 wrote:
Back in the 80s my father was unemployed for 2 years, and tells me that he did not claim benefits, but actually worked self employed as a painter decorator to keep food on our table, and it was actually the first time we had an overseas holiday.

I did not have the best trainers at school (although today that would be an iPad and Diesel jeans) but it didn't do me any harm, since I grew up to appreciate the value of nice things and do have the iPad and Diesel jeans at my own expense.

I could really sympathise with those who are destitute but I would ask - what have they done to remedy themselves out of this situation? Why have we turned into a nation of expectants without any moral responsibility for our own actions or choices.

I'm pretty certain that most of the foodbank users will still smoke, still drink, still drive, and still have Sky TV. They will have iPhones, iPads etc.

It's about priorities and responsibility. Until people take responsibility for their own lives, I for one would never condone the use of these foodbanks, nor benefits as a whole.
Well said. You will most likely upset lots of people on benefits as many seem to think all of the above are essentials even though many people who work can't afford them
[quote][p][bold]roxit78[/bold] wrote: Back in the 80s my father was unemployed for 2 years, and tells me that he did not claim benefits, but actually worked self employed as a painter decorator to keep food on our table, and it was actually the first time we had an overseas holiday. I did not have the best trainers at school (although today that would be an iPad and Diesel jeans) but it didn't do me any harm, since I grew up to appreciate the value of nice things and do have the iPad and Diesel jeans at my own expense. I could really sympathise with those who are destitute but I would ask - what have they done to remedy themselves out of this situation? Why have we turned into a nation of expectants without any moral responsibility for our own actions or choices. I'm pretty certain that most of the foodbank users will still smoke, still drink, still drive, and still have Sky TV. They will have iPhones, iPads etc. It's about priorities and responsibility. Until people take responsibility for their own lives, I for one would never condone the use of these foodbanks, nor benefits as a whole.[/p][/quote]Well said. You will most likely upset lots of people on benefits as many seem to think all of the above are essentials even though many people who work can't afford them justsayithowitis

11:05am Mon 30 Dec 13

ian_the_bute says...

and in other news
millionaires now receive an extra £7500 net a month due to top rate of tax being abolished. Vile ,disgraceful ,and its what YOU voted for
and in other news millionaires now receive an extra £7500 net a month due to top rate of tax being abolished. Vile ,disgraceful ,and its what YOU voted for ian_the_bute

11:06am Mon 30 Dec 13

roguetrader666 says...

Third world? Are they walking for 2 hours, just to get water? People just need to get their priorities right. I often shop late in the evening and see reductions to food. 13p for a large loaf, 3p for pastries etc. if times are so hard, why are there not regular 'third world' families waiting to buy? They still find the money to drink, smoke and get the latest gadgets.
Third world? Are they walking for 2 hours, just to get water? People just need to get their priorities right. I often shop late in the evening and see reductions to food. 13p for a large loaf, 3p for pastries etc. if times are so hard, why are there not regular 'third world' families waiting to buy? They still find the money to drink, smoke and get the latest gadgets. roguetrader666

11:07am Mon 30 Dec 13

user_name says...

roxit78 wrote:
Back in the 80s my father was unemployed for 2 years, and tells me that he did not claim benefits, but actually worked self employed as a painter decorator to keep food on our table, and it was actually the first time we had an overseas holiday.

I did not have the best trainers at school (although today that would be an iPad and Diesel jeans) but it didn't do me any harm, since I grew up to appreciate the value of nice things and do have the iPad and Diesel jeans at my own expense.

I could really sympathise with those who are destitute but I would ask - what have they done to remedy themselves out of this situation? Why have we turned into a nation of expectants without any moral responsibility for our own actions or choices.

I'm pretty certain that most of the foodbank users will still smoke, still drink, still drive, and still have Sky TV. They will have iPhones, iPads etc.

It's about priorities and responsibility. Until people take responsibility for their own lives, I for one would never condone the use of these foodbanks, nor benefits as a whole.
What about those people that are in this situation through no fault of their own? The ones that pay has taken a hit due to illness. The ones that can't afford a car and the ones that are trying to help themselves but find themselves in a hopeless situation. Yes, I agree, some are annoying with their hand out between holidays and expensive pets (etc), but let's not forget those who really do need help.
[quote][p][bold]roxit78[/bold] wrote: Back in the 80s my father was unemployed for 2 years, and tells me that he did not claim benefits, but actually worked self employed as a painter decorator to keep food on our table, and it was actually the first time we had an overseas holiday. I did not have the best trainers at school (although today that would be an iPad and Diesel jeans) but it didn't do me any harm, since I grew up to appreciate the value of nice things and do have the iPad and Diesel jeans at my own expense. I could really sympathise with those who are destitute but I would ask - what have they done to remedy themselves out of this situation? Why have we turned into a nation of expectants without any moral responsibility for our own actions or choices. I'm pretty certain that most of the foodbank users will still smoke, still drink, still drive, and still have Sky TV. They will have iPhones, iPads etc. It's about priorities and responsibility. Until people take responsibility for their own lives, I for one would never condone the use of these foodbanks, nor benefits as a whole.[/p][/quote]What about those people that are in this situation through no fault of their own? The ones that pay has taken a hit due to illness. The ones that can't afford a car and the ones that are trying to help themselves but find themselves in a hopeless situation. Yes, I agree, some are annoying with their hand out between holidays and expensive pets (etc), but let's not forget those who really do need help. user_name

11:10am Mon 30 Dec 13

nickynoodah says...

Back in the 80s my father was unemployed for 2 years, and tells me that he did not claim benefits, but actually worked self employed as a painter decorator to keep food on our table, and it was actually the first time we had an overseas holiday.
1 unemployed
2 worked
3 paid bills
4 overseas holiday
5 did not claim benefit
?????
6 social services knocking on door
7 smells of insurance and tax evasion george
Back in the 80s my father was unemployed for 2 years, and tells me that he did not claim benefits, but actually worked self employed as a painter decorator to keep food on our table, and it was actually the first time we had an overseas holiday. 1 unemployed 2 worked 3 paid bills 4 overseas holiday 5 did not claim benefit ????? 6 social services knocking on door 7 smells of insurance and tax evasion george nickynoodah

11:12am Mon 30 Dec 13

jazzy jenkins says...

And we're sending millions out of the country in aid..what's it all about..Government needs shooting..scandalous
And we're sending millions out of the country in aid..what's it all about..Government needs shooting..scandalous jazzy jenkins

11:18am Mon 30 Dec 13

pauls55 says...

Why do some of the people here assume everyone in need of foodbanks have sky dishes and drink and smoke! Have you ever visited one? You have no evidence whatsoever apart from your own blinkered prejudice and believing the distored rubbish splashed across right wing rags like the Mail and Sun. The fact is we live in a low wage economy deliberately constructed by this vile governement to make sure only the priviledged few can flourish.
Why do some of the people here assume everyone in need of foodbanks have sky dishes and drink and smoke! Have you ever visited one? You have no evidence whatsoever apart from your own blinkered prejudice and believing the distored rubbish splashed across right wing rags like the Mail and Sun. The fact is we live in a low wage economy deliberately constructed by this vile governement to make sure only the priviledged few can flourish. pauls55

11:20am Mon 30 Dec 13

Louise35 says...

I know many people on benefits, family mostly, and though the money isn't great, it IS enough to feed/clothe/house yourself. I wonder how many of these people using food banks have cigarettes in their pockets along with their mobile phones? Priorities people.

I'm single and employed, yet my sister, single unemployed, often has more "spending money" than I do! Yet I still have enough to feed myself. Education is what's needed, expensive convenience foods and takeaways compared to very cheap fresh fruit and veg.
I know many people on benefits, family mostly, and though the money isn't great, it IS enough to feed/clothe/house yourself. I wonder how many of these people using food banks have cigarettes in their pockets along with their mobile phones? Priorities people. I'm single and employed, yet my sister, single unemployed, often has more "spending money" than I do! Yet I still have enough to feed myself. Education is what's needed, expensive convenience foods and takeaways compared to very cheap fresh fruit and veg. Louise35

11:27am Mon 30 Dec 13

Louise35 says...

@Pauls55 I volunteered at a local community centre for many years, as well as being brought up on income support. Queuing up for my school dinner tickets, not having the trendy trainers, not having expensive toys and gadgets, but I did have a roof over my head and food in my tummy.... And I don't read the Daily Mail or The Sun, my opinions are based on real life experiences!
@Pauls55 I volunteered at a local community centre for many years, as well as being brought up on income support. Queuing up for my school dinner tickets, not having the trendy trainers, not having expensive toys and gadgets, but I did have a roof over my head and food in my tummy.... And I don't read the Daily Mail or The Sun, my opinions are based on real life experiences! Louise35

11:29am Mon 30 Dec 13

arthur1948 says...

blame others...even those trying to help...i bet not many commenters here help with the very sad situation..from one of the richest economies in the world...not their problem i guess...money rules...ive got mine sod the rest...
blame others...even those trying to help...i bet not many commenters here help with the very sad situation..from one of the richest economies in the world...not their problem i guess...money rules...ive got mine sod the rest... arthur1948

11:34am Mon 30 Dec 13

Louise35 says...

I wish they allowed people to edit their posts, but anyway....

What is really sad, according to this article only 30% are actually homeless, I wonder if that number would be higher if it weren't for housed people taking advantage of this service? Hungry people who can't receive benefits because they're not in the system?
I wish they allowed people to edit their posts, but anyway.... What is really sad, according to this article only 30% are actually homeless, I wonder if that number would be higher if it weren't for housed people taking advantage of this service? Hungry people who can't receive benefits because they're not in the system? Louise35

11:38am Mon 30 Dec 13

muscliffman says...

I share the main concerns commented upon above. There are certainly opportunities for unscrupulous people to make money (or do rather nicely in other ways) from these largely unregulated 'food banks', whilst there are also people using them (e.g. turning up in their cars) who clearly have no real need to go there.

But the fact is that there are some desperate folk in the UK today who evidently do need this sort of help, especially as pointed out those without kids who can easily find themselves with little or no support from the benefits system. Perhaps we could do with an independent non political inquiry (because the subject is being hijacked for increasingly extreme political reasons by both sides) into this whole subject, primarily to identify the ways in which temporary food banks can be properly managed, licensed and controlled whilst urgent steps are taken to ensure they are simply not required at some point in the near future.
I share the main concerns commented upon above. There are certainly opportunities for unscrupulous people to make money (or do rather nicely in other ways) from these largely unregulated 'food banks', whilst there are also people using them (e.g. turning up in their cars) who clearly have no real need to go there. But the fact is that there are some desperate folk in the UK today who evidently do need this sort of help, especially as pointed out those without kids who can easily find themselves with little or no support from the benefits system. Perhaps we could do with an independent non political inquiry (because the subject is being hijacked for increasingly extreme political reasons by both sides) into this whole subject, primarily to identify the ways in which temporary food banks can be properly managed, licensed and controlled whilst urgent steps are taken to ensure they are simply not required at some point in the near future. muscliffman

11:41am Mon 30 Dec 13

yummybrummy in bournemouth says...

user_name wrote:
roxit78 wrote:
Back in the 80s my father was unemployed for 2 years, and tells me that he did not claim benefits, but actually worked self employed as a painter decorator to keep food on our table, and it was actually the first time we had an overseas holiday.

I did not have the best trainers at school (although today that would be an iPad and Diesel jeans) but it didn't do me any harm, since I grew up to appreciate the value of nice things and do have the iPad and Diesel jeans at my own expense.

I could really sympathise with those who are destitute but I would ask - what have they done to remedy themselves out of this situation? Why have we turned into a nation of expectants without any moral responsibility for our own actions or choices.

I'm pretty certain that most of the foodbank users will still smoke, still drink, still drive, and still have Sky TV. They will have iPhones, iPads etc.

It's about priorities and responsibility. Until people take responsibility for their own lives, I for one would never condone the use of these foodbanks, nor benefits as a whole.
What about those people that are in this situation through no fault of their own? The ones that pay has taken a hit due to illness. The ones that can't afford a car and the ones that are trying to help themselves but find themselves in a hopeless situation. Yes, I agree, some are annoying with their hand out between holidays and expensive pets (etc), but let's not forget those who really do need help.
I was in a situation like that through no fault of my own and I managed ok.
Disabled husband, young son, no car, no MTV or mobile phone... I just got on with it.
It is possible you know... we don't drink, smoke, play the lottery or gamble in any way. Didn't buy "cheap" pre-packaged "food"... cooked everything from scratch (even my bread).
Now I'm happily working for myself, still looking after my husband and son and pretty fed up with the scum who think it is their right to be given hand outs by hard working people who have little to spare for themselves... This is little better than theft... stealing from those who genuinely need it.
Also, to clarify "scum"... an elderly lady I know who has at least £300,000.00 went to a free dinner given for the needy. She took her son (worth at least £70,000) with her. The guy I saw loading food from the bank into his nice car... and he was not collecting for a friend... SCUM.
[quote][p][bold]user_name[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]roxit78[/bold] wrote: Back in the 80s my father was unemployed for 2 years, and tells me that he did not claim benefits, but actually worked self employed as a painter decorator to keep food on our table, and it was actually the first time we had an overseas holiday. I did not have the best trainers at school (although today that would be an iPad and Diesel jeans) but it didn't do me any harm, since I grew up to appreciate the value of nice things and do have the iPad and Diesel jeans at my own expense. I could really sympathise with those who are destitute but I would ask - what have they done to remedy themselves out of this situation? Why have we turned into a nation of expectants without any moral responsibility for our own actions or choices. I'm pretty certain that most of the foodbank users will still smoke, still drink, still drive, and still have Sky TV. They will have iPhones, iPads etc. It's about priorities and responsibility. Until people take responsibility for their own lives, I for one would never condone the use of these foodbanks, nor benefits as a whole.[/p][/quote]What about those people that are in this situation through no fault of their own? The ones that pay has taken a hit due to illness. The ones that can't afford a car and the ones that are trying to help themselves but find themselves in a hopeless situation. Yes, I agree, some are annoying with their hand out between holidays and expensive pets (etc), but let's not forget those who really do need help.[/p][/quote]I was in a situation like that through no fault of my own and I managed ok. Disabled husband, young son, no car, no MTV or mobile phone... I just got on with it. It is possible you know... we don't drink, smoke, play the lottery or gamble in any way. Didn't buy "cheap" pre-packaged "food"... cooked everything from scratch (even my bread). Now I'm happily working for myself, still looking after my husband and son and pretty fed up with the scum who think it is their right to be given hand outs by hard working people who have little to spare for themselves... This is little better than theft... stealing from those who genuinely need it. Also, to clarify "scum"... an elderly lady I know who has at least £300,000.00 went to a free dinner given for the needy. She took her son (worth at least £70,000) with her. The guy I saw loading food from the bank into his nice car... and he was not collecting for a friend... SCUM. yummybrummy in bournemouth

12:00pm Mon 30 Dec 13

Mike R-B says...

Strict "Means testing" should be mandatory for "all" claimants of "free bees" from what ever source..
Strict "Means testing" should be mandatory for "all" claimants of "free bees" from what ever source.. Mike R-B

12:13pm Mon 30 Dec 13

GeorgeW64 says...

This Government doesn't care about it's own citizens, Cameron would rather give our money away to the rest of the world just to make himself look good on the world stage. If he can give £500 million to Syria then he should give a £1000 million to his own starving and freezing people.
This Government doesn't care about it's own citizens, Cameron would rather give our money away to the rest of the world just to make himself look good on the world stage. If he can give £500 million to Syria then he should give a £1000 million to his own starving and freezing people. GeorgeW64

12:13pm Mon 30 Dec 13

wintonCheryl says...

BournemouthMum wrote:
PokesdownMark wrote:
Several new food banks are set up every week in the UK, the are in vogue with a certain brand of Christian sect. I find it odd then that the larger food bank organisations churn out press releases about the numbers of people they serve because they themselves are creating the demand in the first place. I do not doubt that some small number of very needy people benefit. But the organisations press offices talk about hundreds of thousands leading to nonsense headlines about third world Britain. Do not be fooled by those jumping on this most ideological theocratic bandwagon as proof of their political agenda and bias.
Well said. Your comment may prove unpopular but it's very true. Call me a cynic, but people are making money out of these charities.
Try and find out how much the trussell trusts chris mould takes home a year in salary. It's like a secret society.
[quote][p][bold]BournemouthMum[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]PokesdownMark[/bold] wrote: Several new food banks are set up every week in the UK, the are in vogue with a certain brand of Christian sect. I find it odd then that the larger food bank organisations churn out press releases about the numbers of people they serve because they themselves are creating the demand in the first place. I do not doubt that some small number of very needy people benefit. But the organisations press offices talk about hundreds of thousands leading to nonsense headlines about third world Britain. Do not be fooled by those jumping on this most ideological theocratic bandwagon as proof of their political agenda and bias.[/p][/quote]Well said. Your comment may prove unpopular but it's very true. Call me a cynic, but people are making money out of these charities.[/p][/quote]Try and find out how much the trussell trusts chris mould takes home a year in salary. It's like a secret society. wintonCheryl

12:17pm Mon 30 Dec 13

BmthNewshound says...

Like Living in the third world ?, I can only assume that Miss Matthews has never been to the "third world" as she calls it and witnessed real poverty or she would not have made such a crass statement
.
The demand for food banks is another result of Britains out of control benefits culture which has enabled people to live comfortably without having to lift a finger for themselves. Even with the benefits reforms the cap on the amount of benefits a family can receive is still higher than many in work can earn, and benefits are tax free income.
.
Because of their referral process the food banks primarily help people who are already "in the system" whilst many in low paid jobs struggle. We all have to budget and decide on priorities - the latest smart phone, tattoo's and body piercings should come second to buying food.
.
I'd willingly donate to food banks and have no problem in helping people in genuine need. However, those who deserve support are often pushed to one side by people who know how to work the system. There is work out there and if people were desperate enough they’d go out and find a job. But its far easier to sit at home and watch Jeremy Kyle and leave it to mugs like me to go out to work and pay taxes to fund benefits.
.
People still fail to understand that the money for benefits doesn’t appear as if by magic. Taxpayer funded benefits were originally introduced as a safety net but we are now paying the price for successive governments creating a benefits beast that has got out of control.
Like Living in the third world ?, I can only assume that Miss Matthews has never been to the "third world" as she calls it and witnessed real poverty or she would not have made such a crass statement . The demand for food banks is another result of Britains out of control benefits culture which has enabled people to live comfortably without having to lift a finger for themselves. Even with the benefits reforms the cap on the amount of benefits a family can receive is still higher than many in work can earn, and benefits are tax free income. . Because of their referral process the food banks primarily help people who are already "in the system" whilst many in low paid jobs struggle. We all have to budget and decide on priorities - the latest smart phone, tattoo's and body piercings should come second to buying food. . I'd willingly donate to food banks and have no problem in helping people in genuine need. However, those who deserve support are often pushed to one side by people who know how to work the system. There is work out there and if people were desperate enough they’d go out and find a job. But its far easier to sit at home and watch Jeremy Kyle and leave it to mugs like me to go out to work and pay taxes to fund benefits. . People still fail to understand that the money for benefits doesn’t appear as if by magic. Taxpayer funded benefits were originally introduced as a safety net but we are now paying the price for successive governments creating a benefits beast that has got out of control. BmthNewshound

12:35pm Mon 30 Dec 13

Marcus James says...

High Treason wrote:
I wonder how many arrive at the food bank in their cars. By today's standards they may be classed as poor but in reality they are consumer rich with mobile phones, Sky/Virgin subscriptions and running a car etc.
You have hit the nail on the head here.
We live in "we deserve, we expect" society
Everyone feels they are owed something, be it, the single mum with 5 kids, or the couple co-habiting with 3 kids a dog and a snake or just a bloke living on his own.
Rather than give up Sky TV, Holidays abroad, Scooters, Xbox’s and Cars everyone feels that they are entitled to these and that they can moan and complain that they don’t have enough money to provide the basics.
I am not sure at what point society changed but my parents could never afford holidays abroad for us, we had one car which was a tatty old mini, we travelled on the bus to school and both my parents worked. I shared a room with my siblings and I never once received a new bike it was always a pass me down or a second hand bike that dad had fixed up.
I would never want to see anyone feel left out or suffer unnecessarily especially a child but I think there is something fundamentally wrong with today’s society. People are happy to put the blame at anyone’s feet other than their own.
There is then another whole issue around these so called charities that are administering the food banks and the fees / charges they make and the % of donations that get swallowed in admin fees and salaries.
[quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: I wonder how many arrive at the food bank in their cars. By today's standards they may be classed as poor but in reality they are consumer rich with mobile phones, Sky/Virgin subscriptions and running a car etc.[/p][/quote]You have hit the nail on the head here. We live in "we deserve, we expect" society Everyone feels they are owed something, be it, the single mum with 5 kids, or the couple co-habiting with 3 kids a dog and a snake or just a bloke living on his own. Rather than give up Sky TV, Holidays abroad, Scooters, Xbox’s and Cars everyone feels that they are entitled to these and that they can moan and complain that they don’t have enough money to provide the basics. I am not sure at what point society changed but my parents could never afford holidays abroad for us, we had one car which was a tatty old mini, we travelled on the bus to school and both my parents worked. I shared a room with my siblings and I never once received a new bike it was always a pass me down or a second hand bike that dad had fixed up. I would never want to see anyone feel left out or suffer unnecessarily especially a child but I think there is something fundamentally wrong with today’s society. People are happy to put the blame at anyone’s feet other than their own. There is then another whole issue around these so called charities that are administering the food banks and the fees / charges they make and the % of donations that get swallowed in admin fees and salaries. Marcus James

12:51pm Mon 30 Dec 13

PokesdownMark says...

wintonCheryl wrote:
BournemouthMum wrote:
PokesdownMark wrote:
Several new food banks are set up every week in the UK, the are in vogue with a certain brand of Christian sect. I find it odd then that the larger food bank organisations churn out press releases about the numbers of people they serve because they themselves are creating the demand in the first place. I do not doubt that some small number of very needy people benefit. But the organisations press offices talk about hundreds of thousands leading to nonsense headlines about third world Britain. Do not be fooled by those jumping on this most ideological theocratic bandwagon as proof of their political agenda and bias.
Well said. Your comment may prove unpopular but it's very true. Call me a cynic, but people are making money out of these charities.
Try and find out how much the trussell trusts chris mould takes home a year in salary. It's like a secret society.
Found this in a comment on a rather shaky piece on www.opendemocracy website: (for what that's worth?!)

----Over the last two years (2011-12) Mould and his wife have received over £150,000 in wages, salaries, emoluments, consultancy fees and rent payments from Trussell Trust.

The rent payments go to Mould's wife who bills the Trust for office space she leases to it in Salisbury.

Mould has also set up a private company, Chris Mould Limited, through which Trussell Trust has paid him more than £30,000 over the last two years, for "management consultancy" services.----

That actually seems quite reasonable to me. I think the foodbanks are ok. I just wish they, and the left-inclined would not deduce that their supply isn't creating the demand. And their statement that they only step in when exceptional issues arise, such as interruption of benefits, doesn't seem to sit with the numbers of people they claim to help. They can't have great control on the distribution of vouchers. They just use that to claim they only help the most needy. But if they give job centres, doctors, teachers etc wads of vouchers then they are going to be handed out freely I would have thought?
[quote][p][bold]wintonCheryl[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BournemouthMum[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]PokesdownMark[/bold] wrote: Several new food banks are set up every week in the UK, the are in vogue with a certain brand of Christian sect. I find it odd then that the larger food bank organisations churn out press releases about the numbers of people they serve because they themselves are creating the demand in the first place. I do not doubt that some small number of very needy people benefit. But the organisations press offices talk about hundreds of thousands leading to nonsense headlines about third world Britain. Do not be fooled by those jumping on this most ideological theocratic bandwagon as proof of their political agenda and bias.[/p][/quote]Well said. Your comment may prove unpopular but it's very true. Call me a cynic, but people are making money out of these charities.[/p][/quote]Try and find out how much the trussell trusts chris mould takes home a year in salary. It's like a secret society.[/p][/quote]Found this in a comment on a rather shaky piece on www.opendemocracy website: (for what that's worth?!) ----Over the last two years (2011-12) Mould and his wife have received over £150,000 in wages, salaries, emoluments, consultancy fees and rent payments from Trussell Trust. The rent payments go to Mould's wife who bills the Trust for office space she leases to it in Salisbury. Mould has also set up a private company, Chris Mould Limited, through which Trussell Trust has paid him more than £30,000 over the last two years, for "management consultancy" services.---- That actually seems quite reasonable to me. I think the foodbanks are ok. I just wish they, and the left-inclined would not deduce that their supply isn't creating the demand. And their statement that they only step in when exceptional issues arise, such as interruption of benefits, doesn't seem to sit with the numbers of people they claim to help. They can't have great control on the distribution of vouchers. They just use that to claim they only help the most needy. But if they give job centres, doctors, teachers etc wads of vouchers then they are going to be handed out freely I would have thought? PokesdownMark

1:07pm Mon 30 Dec 13

BournemouthMum says...

PokesdownMark wrote:
wintonCheryl wrote:
BournemouthMum wrote:
PokesdownMark wrote:
Several new food banks are set up every week in the UK, the are in vogue with a certain brand of Christian sect. I find it odd then that the larger food bank organisations churn out press releases about the numbers of people they serve because they themselves are creating the demand in the first place. I do not doubt that some small number of very needy people benefit. But the organisations press offices talk about hundreds of thousands leading to nonsense headlines about third world Britain. Do not be fooled by those jumping on this most ideological theocratic bandwagon as proof of their political agenda and bias.
Well said. Your comment may prove unpopular but it's very true. Call me a cynic, but people are making money out of these charities.
Try and find out how much the trussell trusts chris mould takes home a year in salary. It's like a secret society.
Found this in a comment on a rather shaky piece on www.opendemocracy website: (for what that's worth?!)

----Over the last two years (2011-12) Mould and his wife have received over £150,000 in wages, salaries, emoluments, consultancy fees and rent payments from Trussell Trust.

The rent payments go to Mould's wife who bills the Trust for office space she leases to it in Salisbury.

Mould has also set up a private company, Chris Mould Limited, through which Trussell Trust has paid him more than £30,000 over the last two years, for "management consultancy" services.----

That actually seems quite reasonable to me. I think the foodbanks are ok. I just wish they, and the left-inclined would not deduce that their supply isn't creating the demand. And their statement that they only step in when exceptional issues arise, such as interruption of benefits, doesn't seem to sit with the numbers of people they claim to help. They can't have great control on the distribution of vouchers. They just use that to claim they only help the most needy. But if they give job centres, doctors, teachers etc wads of vouchers then they are going to be handed out freely I would have thought?
You find that amount 'quite reasonable'? Well I don't! It's nothing more than a business enterprise to Mould and his wife. Personally I think it's scandalous that individuals can profit out of this kind of thing.
[quote][p][bold]PokesdownMark[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wintonCheryl[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BournemouthMum[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]PokesdownMark[/bold] wrote: Several new food banks are set up every week in the UK, the are in vogue with a certain brand of Christian sect. I find it odd then that the larger food bank organisations churn out press releases about the numbers of people they serve because they themselves are creating the demand in the first place. I do not doubt that some small number of very needy people benefit. But the organisations press offices talk about hundreds of thousands leading to nonsense headlines about third world Britain. Do not be fooled by those jumping on this most ideological theocratic bandwagon as proof of their political agenda and bias.[/p][/quote]Well said. Your comment may prove unpopular but it's very true. Call me a cynic, but people are making money out of these charities.[/p][/quote]Try and find out how much the trussell trusts chris mould takes home a year in salary. It's like a secret society.[/p][/quote]Found this in a comment on a rather shaky piece on www.opendemocracy website: (for what that's worth?!) ----Over the last two years (2011-12) Mould and his wife have received over £150,000 in wages, salaries, emoluments, consultancy fees and rent payments from Trussell Trust. The rent payments go to Mould's wife who bills the Trust for office space she leases to it in Salisbury. Mould has also set up a private company, Chris Mould Limited, through which Trussell Trust has paid him more than £30,000 over the last two years, for "management consultancy" services.---- That actually seems quite reasonable to me. I think the foodbanks are ok. I just wish they, and the left-inclined would not deduce that their supply isn't creating the demand. And their statement that they only step in when exceptional issues arise, such as interruption of benefits, doesn't seem to sit with the numbers of people they claim to help. They can't have great control on the distribution of vouchers. They just use that to claim they only help the most needy. But if they give job centres, doctors, teachers etc wads of vouchers then they are going to be handed out freely I would have thought?[/p][/quote]You find that amount 'quite reasonable'? Well I don't! It's nothing more than a business enterprise to Mould and his wife. Personally I think it's scandalous that individuals can profit out of this kind of thing. BournemouthMum

1:29pm Mon 30 Dec 13

muscliffman says...

BmthNewshound wrote:
Like Living in the third world ?, I can only assume that Miss Matthews has never been to the "third world" as she calls it and witnessed real poverty or she would not have made such a crass statement
.
The demand for food banks is another result of Britains out of control benefits culture which has enabled people to live comfortably without having to lift a finger for themselves. Even with the benefits reforms the cap on the amount of benefits a family can receive is still higher than many in work can earn, and benefits are tax free income.
.
Because of their referral process the food banks primarily help people who are already "in the system" whilst many in low paid jobs struggle. We all have to budget and decide on priorities - the latest smart phone, tattoo's and body piercings should come second to buying food.
.
I'd willingly donate to food banks and have no problem in helping people in genuine need. However, those who deserve support are often pushed to one side by people who know how to work the system. There is work out there and if people were desperate enough they’d go out and find a job. But its far easier to sit at home and watch Jeremy Kyle and leave it to mugs like me to go out to work and pay taxes to fund benefits.
.
People still fail to understand that the money for benefits doesn’t appear as if by magic. Taxpayer funded benefits were originally introduced as a safety net but we are now paying the price for successive governments creating a benefits beast that has got out of control.
Agree with all that except it should be emphasised that the key to 'working the (benefits) system' involves irresponsibly having children - in some cases as we recently read in the Echo (and elsewhere) the more the better to further a 'career' on welfare. People who are without dependant children can very easily find themselves completely outside the benefits system - even after years of contributions. I suspect the unemployed, elderly and ill lacking this vital 'kids' benefits key are the main ones for whom the food banks are a genuine and vital source of support - rather than just a useful way to maintain an otherwise relatively comfortable welfare funded lifestyle.
[quote][p][bold]BmthNewshound[/bold] wrote: Like Living in the third world ?, I can only assume that Miss Matthews has never been to the "third world" as she calls it and witnessed real poverty or she would not have made such a crass statement . The demand for food banks is another result of Britains out of control benefits culture which has enabled people to live comfortably without having to lift a finger for themselves. Even with the benefits reforms the cap on the amount of benefits a family can receive is still higher than many in work can earn, and benefits are tax free income. . Because of their referral process the food banks primarily help people who are already "in the system" whilst many in low paid jobs struggle. We all have to budget and decide on priorities - the latest smart phone, tattoo's and body piercings should come second to buying food. . I'd willingly donate to food banks and have no problem in helping people in genuine need. However, those who deserve support are often pushed to one side by people who know how to work the system. There is work out there and if people were desperate enough they’d go out and find a job. But its far easier to sit at home and watch Jeremy Kyle and leave it to mugs like me to go out to work and pay taxes to fund benefits. . People still fail to understand that the money for benefits doesn’t appear as if by magic. Taxpayer funded benefits were originally introduced as a safety net but we are now paying the price for successive governments creating a benefits beast that has got out of control.[/p][/quote]Agree with all that except it should be emphasised that the key to 'working the (benefits) system' involves irresponsibly having children - in some cases as we recently read in the Echo (and elsewhere) the more the better to further a 'career' on welfare. People who are without dependant children can very easily find themselves completely outside the benefits system - even after years of contributions. I suspect the unemployed, elderly and ill lacking this vital 'kids' benefits key are the main ones for whom the food banks are a genuine and vital source of support - rather than just a useful way to maintain an otherwise relatively comfortable welfare funded lifestyle. muscliffman

1:30pm Mon 30 Dec 13

keith milton says...

"When people lose everything and have nothing left to lose - they lose it.
"When people lose everything and have nothing left to lose - they lose it. keith milton

2:05pm Mon 30 Dec 13

susi.m says...

I know of someone who attends a food bank but they have more disposable income than I do and I work full time.
They have 2 x takeaways a week, Sky TV, Ipad, I phone, X-box.
They have a mobility car but can walk just as well as me.
Should I report them to someone? or should I just go to the food bank myself?
I know of someone who attends a food bank but they have more disposable income than I do and I work full time. They have 2 x takeaways a week, Sky TV, Ipad, I phone, X-box. They have a mobility car but can walk just as well as me. Should I report them to someone? or should I just go to the food bank myself? susi.m

2:06pm Mon 30 Dec 13

hamworthygirl says...

All politicians are the same to be honest they do not care for the likes of us. I remember the 80's very well we had a mortgage extortionate interest rates husband working luckily, 7 days a week though , small child, we went without to feed her. We never went out or had christmas presents for ourselves and sold what we could to pay bills. I am sure some people are struggling these day but I do wonder if they still have contract mobiles and nice tv's there does come a time when these things have to go to provide food for the family.
All politicians are the same to be honest they do not care for the likes of us. I remember the 80's very well we had a mortgage extortionate interest rates husband working luckily, 7 days a week though , small child, we went without to feed her. We never went out or had christmas presents for ourselves and sold what we could to pay bills. I am sure some people are struggling these day but I do wonder if they still have contract mobiles and nice tv's there does come a time when these things have to go to provide food for the family. hamworthygirl

2:16pm Mon 30 Dec 13

jagzter says...

You give out free food and people turn up? I don't believe it!
Like when teachers hand out free sandwiches to kids and they think they are starving because they eat it!
KFC was packed this lunchtime in Poole, just like Mogadishu KFC I imagine.
Does anybody actually know anyone who goes to the foodbank and why they don't have any money to buy food other than if someone gives you a free weeks shopping you can spend your benefits on something else?
You give out free food and people turn up? I don't believe it! Like when teachers hand out free sandwiches to kids and they think they are starving because they eat it! KFC was packed this lunchtime in Poole, just like Mogadishu KFC I imagine. Does anybody actually know anyone who goes to the foodbank and why they don't have any money to buy food other than if someone gives you a free weeks shopping you can spend your benefits on something else? jagzter

2:40pm Mon 30 Dec 13

bournemouthsimon says...

Just goes to show when the tories get into power how out of touch they really are its time people in the south of the uk woke up and stopped voting tory. The last Labour government was only brought down by the bankers taking billions from working people so the last government had to pay it off to save working people, please people of the south see the light and never vote tory again. take care simon
Just goes to show when the tories get into power how out of touch they really are its time people in the south of the uk woke up and stopped voting tory. The last Labour government was only brought down by the bankers taking billions from working people so the last government had to pay it off to save working people, please people of the south see the light and never vote tory again. take care simon bournemouthsimon

2:44pm Mon 30 Dec 13

Chris the plumber says...

Well said Jagzter,
only a prosperous nation could afford to give away food, not rice and water but quality food that cost a lot...
3rd world my foot
Well said Jagzter, only a prosperous nation could afford to give away food, not rice and water but quality food that cost a lot... 3rd world my foot Chris the plumber

2:44pm Mon 30 Dec 13

street warrior says...

Om a separate note, I was listening to an article on LBC radio station just this week, and it was talking about Children In Need, the charity us brits donate to ! Well firstly I didn't know the head of the charity is Lenny Henry, secondly the charity itself is sitting on a hundred million pounds in the bank! So much for every penny goes to a needy child, I'm so pleased I have never donated any money to this "needy" charity
Om a separate note, I was listening to an article on LBC radio station just this week, and it was talking about Children In Need, the charity us brits donate to ! Well firstly I didn't know the head of the charity is Lenny Henry, secondly the charity itself is sitting on a hundred million pounds in the bank! So much for every penny goes to a needy child, I'm so pleased I have never donated any money to this "needy" charity street warrior

2:49pm Mon 30 Dec 13

PokesdownMark says...

BournemouthMum wrote:
PokesdownMark wrote:
wintonCheryl wrote:
BournemouthMum wrote:
PokesdownMark wrote:
Several new food banks are set up every week in the UK, the are in vogue with a certain brand of Christian sect. I find it odd then that the larger food bank organisations churn out press releases about the numbers of people they serve because they themselves are creating the demand in the first place. I do not doubt that some small number of very needy people benefit. But the organisations press offices talk about hundreds of thousands leading to nonsense headlines about third world Britain. Do not be fooled by those jumping on this most ideological theocratic bandwagon as proof of their political agenda and bias.
Well said. Your comment may prove unpopular but it's very true. Call me a cynic, but people are making money out of these charities.
Try and find out how much the trussell trusts chris mould takes home a year in salary. It's like a secret society.
Found this in a comment on a rather shaky piece on www.opendemocracy website: (for what that's worth?!)

----Over the last two years (2011-12) Mould and his wife have received over £150,000 in wages, salaries, emoluments, consultancy fees and rent payments from Trussell Trust.

The rent payments go to Mould's wife who bills the Trust for office space she leases to it in Salisbury.

Mould has also set up a private company, Chris Mould Limited, through which Trussell Trust has paid him more than £30,000 over the last two years, for "management consultancy" services.----

That actually seems quite reasonable to me. I think the foodbanks are ok. I just wish they, and the left-inclined would not deduce that their supply isn't creating the demand. And their statement that they only step in when exceptional issues arise, such as interruption of benefits, doesn't seem to sit with the numbers of people they claim to help. They can't have great control on the distribution of vouchers. They just use that to claim they only help the most needy. But if they give job centres, doctors, teachers etc wads of vouchers then they are going to be handed out freely I would have thought?
You find that amount 'quite reasonable'? Well I don't! It's nothing more than a business enterprise to Mould and his wife. Personally I think it's scandalous that individuals can profit out of this kind of thing.
That's for two of them over two years remember. Less than £40k each per year to run a national organisation. Which has over a million pound turnover.
There is a TED talk about the benefits of running charities like companies. Worth a watch. It changed my mind about charity overheads being always evil. The idea is that if someone can multiply the good delivered by a charity by many fold the it is reasonable to pay that person market rates.
[quote][p][bold]BournemouthMum[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]PokesdownMark[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wintonCheryl[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BournemouthMum[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]PokesdownMark[/bold] wrote: Several new food banks are set up every week in the UK, the are in vogue with a certain brand of Christian sect. I find it odd then that the larger food bank organisations churn out press releases about the numbers of people they serve because they themselves are creating the demand in the first place. I do not doubt that some small number of very needy people benefit. But the organisations press offices talk about hundreds of thousands leading to nonsense headlines about third world Britain. Do not be fooled by those jumping on this most ideological theocratic bandwagon as proof of their political agenda and bias.[/p][/quote]Well said. Your comment may prove unpopular but it's very true. Call me a cynic, but people are making money out of these charities.[/p][/quote]Try and find out how much the trussell trusts chris mould takes home a year in salary. It's like a secret society.[/p][/quote]Found this in a comment on a rather shaky piece on www.opendemocracy website: (for what that's worth?!) ----Over the last two years (2011-12) Mould and his wife have received over £150,000 in wages, salaries, emoluments, consultancy fees and rent payments from Trussell Trust. The rent payments go to Mould's wife who bills the Trust for office space she leases to it in Salisbury. Mould has also set up a private company, Chris Mould Limited, through which Trussell Trust has paid him more than £30,000 over the last two years, for "management consultancy" services.---- That actually seems quite reasonable to me. I think the foodbanks are ok. I just wish they, and the left-inclined would not deduce that their supply isn't creating the demand. And their statement that they only step in when exceptional issues arise, such as interruption of benefits, doesn't seem to sit with the numbers of people they claim to help. They can't have great control on the distribution of vouchers. They just use that to claim they only help the most needy. But if they give job centres, doctors, teachers etc wads of vouchers then they are going to be handed out freely I would have thought?[/p][/quote]You find that amount 'quite reasonable'? Well I don't! It's nothing more than a business enterprise to Mould and his wife. Personally I think it's scandalous that individuals can profit out of this kind of thing.[/p][/quote]That's for two of them over two years remember. Less than £40k each per year to run a national organisation. Which has over a million pound turnover. There is a TED talk about the benefits of running charities like companies. Worth a watch. It changed my mind about charity overheads being always evil. The idea is that if someone can multiply the good delivered by a charity by many fold the it is reasonable to pay that person market rates. PokesdownMark

3:17pm Mon 30 Dec 13

Peroni says...

wintonCheryl wrote:
Ask the trussell trust how much they charge a church to set up one of their foodbanks. It costs £1500 then a further annual fee.all the food is then donated by the public. So where does all this money go??? Google them, it makes interesting reading once you scratch below the surface
I've just had a read and only the surface ,yes interesting ,not what I had thought.
People should read .
The more I read about charities ,the more the public should be aware of the amount the end users get from the donated money !
England is full of well meaning generous people, but when they find out ( and it needs a to be !) about the substantial salaries ,expenses etc etc etc of some of these charity's .
I hope it won't put off the flow of goodwill.
[quote][p][bold]wintonCheryl[/bold] wrote: Ask the trussell trust how much they charge a church to set up one of their foodbanks. It costs £1500 then a further annual fee.all the food is then donated by the public. So where does all this money go??? Google them, it makes interesting reading once you scratch below the surface[/p][/quote]I've just had a read and only the surface ,yes interesting ,not what I had thought. People should read . The more I read about charities ,the more the public should be aware of the amount the end users get from the donated money ! England is full of well meaning generous people, but when they find out ( and it needs a to be !) about the substantial salaries ,expenses etc etc etc of some of these charity's . I hope it won't put off the flow of goodwill. Peroni

3:39pm Mon 30 Dec 13

KLH says...

I think I recognise on of the people in the photo. If I am right a former Big Issue seller who was very aggressive when I wouldn't buy the magazine off him a year ago. He and a similar looking chap were aggressively begging around the same time, he was quite nasty. Like I said, the guy in the picture LOOKS like him. If that is him and he's still begging then he probably has a few quid in his pocket for food, except this cash is for other things know what I mean....
I think I recognise on of the people in the photo. If I am right a former Big Issue seller who was very aggressive when I wouldn't buy the magazine off him a year ago. He and a similar looking chap were aggressively begging around the same time, he was quite nasty. Like I said, the guy in the picture LOOKS like him. If that is him and he's still begging then he probably has a few quid in his pocket for food, except this cash is for other things know what I mean.... KLH

3:44pm Mon 30 Dec 13

KLH says...

....to add as can't edit, the picture I am referring to is the one in the printed version of the Echo, just noticed the photos accompanying this online version do not have this chap in them, they are different, so I am not referring to anyone in the photos above.
....to add as can't edit, the picture I am referring to is the one in the printed version of the Echo, just noticed the photos accompanying this online version do not have this chap in them, they are different, so I am not referring to anyone in the photos above. KLH

3:54pm Mon 30 Dec 13

EGHH says...

It cant be so! Ian Duncan-Smith says its all left-wing propaganda. He wont even release the Governments own figures on food bank usage! He is another Tory Toff who lives in a fantasy world. I'll be so glad when this lot of clowns gets voted out in 2015.
It cant be so! Ian Duncan-Smith says its all left-wing propaganda. He wont even release the Governments own figures on food bank usage! He is another Tory Toff who lives in a fantasy world. I'll be so glad when this lot of clowns gets voted out in 2015. EGHH

4:57pm Mon 30 Dec 13

shaft says...

Unfortunately you are always going to get the not so needed taking advantage when this sort of help is advertised. Shameful as it is it's human Greed.
Unfortunately you are always going to get the not so needed taking advantage when this sort of help is advertised. Shameful as it is it's human Greed. shaft

5:30pm Mon 30 Dec 13

Rabbitman64 says...

seakayaker wrote:
arthur1948 wrote:
Welcome to caring Britain under the Tories .....rob the poor and give to the rich.
Hate to blind you with facts but under this coalition government those on lower pay have had their net pay increased as the starting point for paying tax has risen. Under Labour a person working 40 hours a week on minimum wage would have had to pay tax on everything he earned after 18 hours; now it is on only that earned after 28 hours and that is set to rise still further. You see Labour just talk about caring but the reality is they want to keep the poor in their place as vote fodder
First of all I must congratulate the Echo on this excellent standard of journalism. The issue of the poor paying less tax is fairly minimal. You have to be on a very low salary for that to be applicable to you and I am sure that most people have more ambition than that! It is a typical wet Liberal Democrat policy.

After three years of this awful government this is terrible situation for people to be using the Foodbanks? In the Tory Heartland of Bournemouth as well! The Liberal Democrats have shown that they are nothing more than a ' bunch of political prostitutes'.

It does appear that we do need the sort of revolution that Russell Brand talked about recently!
[quote][p][bold]seakayaker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]arthur1948[/bold] wrote: Welcome to caring Britain under the Tories .....rob the poor and give to the rich.[/p][/quote]Hate to blind you with facts but under this coalition government those on lower pay have had their net pay increased as the starting point for paying tax has risen. Under Labour a person working 40 hours a week on minimum wage would have had to pay tax on everything he earned after 18 hours; now it is on only that earned after 28 hours and that is set to rise still further. You see Labour just talk about caring but the reality is they want to keep the poor in their place as vote fodder[/p][/quote]First of all I must congratulate the Echo on this excellent standard of journalism. The issue of the poor paying less tax is fairly minimal. You have to be on a very low salary for that to be applicable to you and I am sure that most people have more ambition than that! It is a typical wet Liberal Democrat policy. After three years of this awful government this is terrible situation for people to be using the Foodbanks? In the Tory Heartland of Bournemouth as well! The Liberal Democrats have shown that they are nothing more than a ' bunch of political prostitutes'. It does appear that we do need the sort of revolution that Russell Brand talked about recently! Rabbitman64

6:00pm Mon 30 Dec 13

wintonCheryl says...

Peroni wrote:
wintonCheryl wrote:
Ask the trussell trust how much they charge a church to set up one of their foodbanks. It costs £1500 then a further annual fee.all the food is then donated by the public. So where does all this money go??? Google them, it makes interesting reading once you scratch below the surface
I've just had a read and only the surface ,yes interesting ,not what I had thought.
People should read .
The more I read about charities ,the more the public should be aware of the amount the end users get from the donated money !
England is full of well meaning generous people, but when they find out ( and it needs a to be !) about the substantial salaries ,expenses etc etc etc of some of these charity's .
I hope it won't put off the flow of goodwill.
As long as I run a charity people must think I'm doing it for free. Wake up people.they are creaming off a fortune to feather their own luxurious nests. As an example check out the small print on those bags that come through your letterbox asking for clothes.hardly a penny goes to the actual charity. The rest goes on petrol for the charity s md' s Ferrari. It's all about the money
[quote][p][bold]Peroni[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wintonCheryl[/bold] wrote: Ask the trussell trust how much they charge a church to set up one of their foodbanks. It costs £1500 then a further annual fee.all the food is then donated by the public. So where does all this money go??? Google them, it makes interesting reading once you scratch below the surface[/p][/quote]I've just had a read and only the surface ,yes interesting ,not what I had thought. People should read . The more I read about charities ,the more the public should be aware of the amount the end users get from the donated money ! England is full of well meaning generous people, but when they find out ( and it needs a to be !) about the substantial salaries ,expenses etc etc etc of some of these charity's . I hope it won't put off the flow of goodwill.[/p][/quote]As long as I run a charity people must think I'm doing it for free. Wake up people.they are creaming off a fortune to feather their own luxurious nests. As an example check out the small print on those bags that come through your letterbox asking for clothes.hardly a penny goes to the actual charity. The rest goes on petrol for the charity s md' s Ferrari. It's all about the money wintonCheryl

6:20pm Mon 30 Dec 13

HRH of Boscombe says...

ian_the_bute wrote:
and in other news
millionaires now receive an extra £7500 net a month due to top rate of tax being abolished. Vile ,disgraceful ,and its what YOU voted for
People shouldn't have families they can't afford.
.
I expect more are abusing the system anyway to get a freebie.
.
The top rate of tax is not for millionaires. It's abusing people who have worked hard and get paid well.
.
How do you think it was right to take half of someone's earnings just because they earn more than you?
[quote][p][bold]ian_the_bute[/bold] wrote: and in other news millionaires now receive an extra £7500 net a month due to top rate of tax being abolished. Vile ,disgraceful ,and its what YOU voted for[/p][/quote]People shouldn't have families they can't afford. . I expect more are abusing the system anyway to get a freebie. . The top rate of tax is not for millionaires. It's abusing people who have worked hard and get paid well. . How do you think it was right to take half of someone's earnings just because they earn more than you? HRH of Boscombe

6:27pm Mon 30 Dec 13

portia6 says...

You never know how your life will turn out and sometimes its not your fault.
Greed and immorality has taken over. The Red Cross have always been
there if there is a crisis. Let's hope the needy families get the help they
deserve.
You never know how your life will turn out and sometimes its not your fault. Greed and immorality has taken over. The Red Cross have always been there if there is a crisis. Let's hope the needy families get the help they deserve. portia6

6:38pm Mon 30 Dec 13

wintonCheryl says...

PokesdownMark wrote:
BournemouthMum wrote:
PokesdownMark wrote:
wintonCheryl wrote:
BournemouthMum wrote:
PokesdownMark wrote:
Several new food banks are set up every week in the UK, the are in vogue with a certain brand of Christian sect. I find it odd then that the larger food bank organisations churn out press releases about the numbers of people they serve because they themselves are creating the demand in the first place. I do not doubt that some small number of very needy people benefit. But the organisations press offices talk about hundreds of thousands leading to nonsense headlines about third world Britain. Do not be fooled by those jumping on this most ideological theocratic bandwagon as proof of their political agenda and bias.
Well said. Your comment may prove unpopular but it's very true. Call me a cynic, but people are making money out of these charities.
Try and find out how much the trussell trusts chris mould takes home a year in salary. It's like a secret society.
Found this in a comment on a rather shaky piece on www.opendemocracy website: (for what that's worth?!)

----Over the last two years (2011-12) Mould and his wife have received over £150,000 in wages, salaries, emoluments, consultancy fees and rent payments from Trussell Trust.

The rent payments go to Mould's wife who bills the Trust for office space she leases to it in Salisbury.

Mould has also set up a private company, Chris Mould Limited, through which Trussell Trust has paid him more than £30,000 over the last two years, for "management consultancy" services.----

That actually seems quite reasonable to me. I think the foodbanks are ok. I just wish they, and the left-inclined would not deduce that their supply isn't creating the demand. And their statement that they only step in when exceptional issues arise, such as interruption of benefits, doesn't seem to sit with the numbers of people they claim to help. They can't have great control on the distribution of vouchers. They just use that to claim they only help the most needy. But if they give job centres, doctors, teachers etc wads of vouchers then they are going to be handed out freely I would have thought?
You find that amount 'quite reasonable'? Well I don't! It's nothing more than a business enterprise to Mould and his wife. Personally I think it's scandalous that individuals can profit out of this kind of thing.
That's for two of them over two years remember. Less than £40k each per year to run a national organisation. Which has over a million pound turnover.
There is a TED talk about the benefits of running charities like companies. Worth a watch. It changed my mind about charity overheads being always evil. The idea is that if someone can multiply the good delivered by a charity by many fold the it is reasonable to pay that person market rates.
How can you justify £75k a year to run a charity that has limitless incoming from the common man and charging each food bank £1500 a time to set up and try and help.bet the trussell trusts coffers are swelling with all this money. Nice little nest egg for someone
[quote][p][bold]PokesdownMark[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BournemouthMum[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]PokesdownMark[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wintonCheryl[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BournemouthMum[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]PokesdownMark[/bold] wrote: Several new food banks are set up every week in the UK, the are in vogue with a certain brand of Christian sect. I find it odd then that the larger food bank organisations churn out press releases about the numbers of people they serve because they themselves are creating the demand in the first place. I do not doubt that some small number of very needy people benefit. But the organisations press offices talk about hundreds of thousands leading to nonsense headlines about third world Britain. Do not be fooled by those jumping on this most ideological theocratic bandwagon as proof of their political agenda and bias.[/p][/quote]Well said. Your comment may prove unpopular but it's very true. Call me a cynic, but people are making money out of these charities.[/p][/quote]Try and find out how much the trussell trusts chris mould takes home a year in salary. It's like a secret society.[/p][/quote]Found this in a comment on a rather shaky piece on www.opendemocracy website: (for what that's worth?!) ----Over the last two years (2011-12) Mould and his wife have received over £150,000 in wages, salaries, emoluments, consultancy fees and rent payments from Trussell Trust. The rent payments go to Mould's wife who bills the Trust for office space she leases to it in Salisbury. Mould has also set up a private company, Chris Mould Limited, through which Trussell Trust has paid him more than £30,000 over the last two years, for "management consultancy" services.---- That actually seems quite reasonable to me. I think the foodbanks are ok. I just wish they, and the left-inclined would not deduce that their supply isn't creating the demand. And their statement that they only step in when exceptional issues arise, such as interruption of benefits, doesn't seem to sit with the numbers of people they claim to help. They can't have great control on the distribution of vouchers. They just use that to claim they only help the most needy. But if they give job centres, doctors, teachers etc wads of vouchers then they are going to be handed out freely I would have thought?[/p][/quote]You find that amount 'quite reasonable'? Well I don't! It's nothing more than a business enterprise to Mould and his wife. Personally I think it's scandalous that individuals can profit out of this kind of thing.[/p][/quote]That's for two of them over two years remember. Less than £40k each per year to run a national organisation. Which has over a million pound turnover. There is a TED talk about the benefits of running charities like companies. Worth a watch. It changed my mind about charity overheads being always evil. The idea is that if someone can multiply the good delivered by a charity by many fold the it is reasonable to pay that person market rates.[/p][/quote]How can you justify £75k a year to run a charity that has limitless incoming from the common man and charging each food bank £1500 a time to set up and try and help.bet the trussell trusts coffers are swelling with all this money. Nice little nest egg for someone wintonCheryl

6:57pm Mon 30 Dec 13

whataboutthat says...

Most charities are businesses first, with directors/players on retained 'emoluments' i.e dosh, then giver-outers second. So many charities sit on millions in the bank - guide dogs for the blind is a good one, as is the RNLI, don't mention the National Trust. If many of these charities were listed on the Stock Exchange they would be in the FTSE 100 on cash assets alone. Don't believe me? - go research it.
Most charities are businesses first, with directors/players on retained 'emoluments' i.e dosh, then giver-outers second. So many charities sit on millions in the bank - guide dogs for the blind is a good one, as is the RNLI, don't mention the National Trust. If many of these charities were listed on the Stock Exchange they would be in the FTSE 100 on cash assets alone. Don't believe me? - go research it. whataboutthat

7:13pm Mon 30 Dec 13

keith milton says...

what do you expect when we have nazi's running the country,the 3 party myth,

con/lib/lab all work for the same evil elites,the whole system needs taking out and changing.
what do you expect when we have nazi's running the country,the 3 party myth, con/lib/lab all work for the same evil elites,the whole system needs taking out and changing. keith milton

7:56pm Mon 30 Dec 13

spooki says...

BournemouthMum wrote:
Those who fare worse in this country are single people - whether in work or unemployed. Those will kids will never suffer hardship as benefits are paid in abundance for producing children - i.e. child benefit, housing benefit and tax credits and the council has a duty to provide accommodation. I feel genuinely sorry for single unemployed people who get £70 a week to live on. This is supplosed to pay for their food, utilities, trips to the Jobcentre and phone callss to apply for jobs. If families with children are going without food when they are paid ample benefits for the children then all I can say is they must be misappropriating funds that are meant to be spent on their children.

Thumbs down my comment if you like - but it's true.
I don't think being a single parent means you get "abundant" benefits (I certainly don't but then I'm honest when I fill out forms), but I do agree that a lot of folk in my situation seem to have fancy contract phones, full Sky privileges, new games consoles (new PS4s as I've seen a few with) and other such things I would class as luxuries. Priorities as far as I'm concerned are food and clothes for my daughter, then stuff for me and some in savings. I very rarely even buy clothes for myself and I tend to only shop in cheap places as that's all I can afford.
I hope these food bank customers are genuine and not taking the supplies from someone who really needs it.
[quote][p][bold]BournemouthMum[/bold] wrote: Those who fare worse in this country are single people - whether in work or unemployed. Those will kids will never suffer hardship as benefits are paid in abundance for producing children - i.e. child benefit, housing benefit and tax credits and the council has a duty to provide accommodation. I feel genuinely sorry for single unemployed people who get £70 a week to live on. This is supplosed to pay for their food, utilities, trips to the Jobcentre and phone callss to apply for jobs. If families with children are going without food when they are paid ample benefits for the children then all I can say is they must be misappropriating funds that are meant to be spent on their children. Thumbs down my comment if you like - but it's true.[/p][/quote]I don't think being a single parent means you get "abundant" benefits (I certainly don't but then I'm honest when I fill out forms), but I do agree that a lot of folk in my situation seem to have fancy contract phones, full Sky privileges, new games consoles (new PS4s as I've seen a few with) and other such things I would class as luxuries. Priorities as far as I'm concerned are food and clothes for my daughter, then stuff for me and some in savings. I very rarely even buy clothes for myself and I tend to only shop in cheap places as that's all I can afford. I hope these food bank customers are genuine and not taking the supplies from someone who really needs it. spooki

8:27pm Mon 30 Dec 13

fireflier says...

Loads of Government stories about people getting jobs and the fall in unemployment. Truth is peopel are scrounging around for a few hours here-or-there on part time or zero hours contracts jsut to bring in a few quid.

The expansion in jobs is a myth which this Coalition have you believe is the way to their new Britain. We are all in the sh1t together...or getting that way.
Loads of Government stories about people getting jobs and the fall in unemployment. Truth is peopel are scrounging around for a few hours here-or-there on part time or zero hours contracts jsut to bring in a few quid. The expansion in jobs is a myth which this Coalition have you believe is the way to their new Britain. We are all in the sh1t together...or getting that way. fireflier

8:48pm Mon 30 Dec 13

shaft says...

keith milton wrote:
"When people lose everything and have nothing left to lose - they lose it.
If your not confused, you're not paying attention." So random.
[quote][p][bold]keith milton[/bold] wrote: "When people lose everything and have nothing left to lose - they lose it.[/p][/quote]If your not confused, you're not paying attention." So random. shaft

10:28pm Mon 30 Dec 13

JemBmth says...

Ban people on benefits from buying, booze, fags, smartphones, entering amusement arcades, pubs etc!
Ban people on benefits from buying, booze, fags, smartphones, entering amusement arcades, pubs etc! JemBmth

10:44pm Mon 30 Dec 13

stevobath says...

seakayaker wrote:
arthur1948 wrote:
Welcome to caring Britain under the Tories .....rob the poor and give to the rich.
Hate to blind you with facts but under this coalition government those on lower pay have had their net pay increased as the starting point for paying tax has risen. Under Labour a person working 40 hours a week on minimum wage would have had to pay tax on everything he earned after 18 hours; now it is on only that earned after 28 hours and that is set to rise still further. You see Labour just talk about caring but the reality is they want to keep the poor in their place as vote fodder
Are you just 'Trolling' or do you seriously believe the poorest people are now better off? Or are you just being obtuse regarding the facts?
[quote][p][bold]seakayaker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]arthur1948[/bold] wrote: Welcome to caring Britain under the Tories .....rob the poor and give to the rich.[/p][/quote]Hate to blind you with facts but under this coalition government those on lower pay have had their net pay increased as the starting point for paying tax has risen. Under Labour a person working 40 hours a week on minimum wage would have had to pay tax on everything he earned after 18 hours; now it is on only that earned after 28 hours and that is set to rise still further. You see Labour just talk about caring but the reality is they want to keep the poor in their place as vote fodder[/p][/quote]Are you just 'Trolling' or do you seriously believe the poorest people are now better off? Or are you just being obtuse regarding the facts? stevobath

10:51pm Mon 30 Dec 13

stevobath says...

Dorset Logic wrote:
arthur1948 wrote:
Welcome to caring Britain under the Tories .....rob the poor and give to the rich.
I seem to remember these food banks existing for quite a while now - including under labour, but don't let the facts worry you. Politicians of any party are not going to save anyone.
Yes they existed. Have done for years. However it's no surprise those using them have gone up from around 60,000 under Labour to over 360,000 now. These are official figures. Also there are many other smaller charities providing the same kind of help who never get a mention. The real figures are probably higher.
The scum that walked out during the Foodbank Debate are disgusting. They haven't a decent humane bone in their selfish Selservative bodies.
[quote][p][bold]Dorset Logic[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]arthur1948[/bold] wrote: Welcome to caring Britain under the Tories .....rob the poor and give to the rich.[/p][/quote]I seem to remember these food banks existing for quite a while now - including under labour, but don't let the facts worry you. Politicians of any party are not going to save anyone.[/p][/quote]Yes they existed. Have done for years. However it's no surprise those using them have gone up from around 60,000 under Labour to over 360,000 now. These are official figures. Also there are many other smaller charities providing the same kind of help who never get a mention. The real figures are probably higher. The scum that walked out during the Foodbank Debate are disgusting. They haven't a decent humane bone in their selfish Selservative bodies. stevobath

10:59pm Mon 30 Dec 13

stevobath says...

roxit78 wrote:
Back in the 80s my father was unemployed for 2 years, and tells me that he did not claim benefits, but actually worked self employed as a painter decorator to keep food on our table, and it was actually the first time we had an overseas holiday.

I did not have the best trainers at school (although today that would be an iPad and Diesel jeans) but it didn't do me any harm, since I grew up to appreciate the value of nice things and do have the iPad and Diesel jeans at my own expense.

I could really sympathise with those who are destitute but I would ask - what have they done to remedy themselves out of this situation? Why have we turned into a nation of expectants without any moral responsibility for our own actions or choices.

I'm pretty certain that most of the foodbank users will still smoke, still drink, still drive, and still have Sky TV. They will have iPhones, iPads etc.

It's about priorities and responsibility. Until people take responsibility for their own lives, I for one would never condone the use of these foodbanks, nor benefits as a whole.
So your' Dad Wasn't unemployed. He was working (fiddling?) on the side?
Unemployed means not working. Your' Father wasn't entitled to claim if he was painting & decorating IE EMPLOYED!

As for pontificating on food banks etc. Who made you moral arbiter & Judge & Jury?
[quote][p][bold]roxit78[/bold] wrote: Back in the 80s my father was unemployed for 2 years, and tells me that he did not claim benefits, but actually worked self employed as a painter decorator to keep food on our table, and it was actually the first time we had an overseas holiday. I did not have the best trainers at school (although today that would be an iPad and Diesel jeans) but it didn't do me any harm, since I grew up to appreciate the value of nice things and do have the iPad and Diesel jeans at my own expense. I could really sympathise with those who are destitute but I would ask - what have they done to remedy themselves out of this situation? Why have we turned into a nation of expectants without any moral responsibility for our own actions or choices. I'm pretty certain that most of the foodbank users will still smoke, still drink, still drive, and still have Sky TV. They will have iPhones, iPads etc. It's about priorities and responsibility. Until people take responsibility for their own lives, I for one would never condone the use of these foodbanks, nor benefits as a whole.[/p][/quote]So your' Dad Wasn't unemployed. He was working (fiddling?) on the side? Unemployed means not working. Your' Father wasn't entitled to claim if he was painting & decorating IE EMPLOYED! As for pontificating on food banks etc. Who made you moral arbiter & Judge & Jury? stevobath

11:09pm Mon 30 Dec 13

stevobath says...

PokesdownMark wrote:
wintonCheryl wrote:
BournemouthMum wrote:
PokesdownMark wrote:
Several new food banks are set up every week in the UK, the are in vogue with a certain brand of Christian sect. I find it odd then that the larger food bank organisations churn out press releases about the numbers of people they serve because they themselves are creating the demand in the first place. I do not doubt that some small number of very needy people benefit. But the organisations press offices talk about hundreds of thousands leading to nonsense headlines about third world Britain. Do not be fooled by those jumping on this most ideological theocratic bandwagon as proof of their political agenda and bias.
Well said. Your comment may prove unpopular but it's very true. Call me a cynic, but people are making money out of these charities.
Try and find out how much the trussell trusts chris mould takes home a year in salary. It's like a secret society.
Found this in a comment on a rather shaky piece on www.opendemocracy website: (for what that's worth?!)

----Over the last two years (2011-12) Mould and his wife have received over £150,000 in wages, salaries, emoluments, consultancy fees and rent payments from Trussell Trust.

The rent payments go to Mould's wife who bills the Trust for office space she leases to it in Salisbury.

Mould has also set up a private company, Chris Mould Limited, through which Trussell Trust has paid him more than £30,000 over the last two years, for "management consultancy" services.----

That actually seems quite reasonable to me. I think the foodbanks are ok. I just wish they, and the left-inclined would not deduce that their supply isn't creating the demand. And their statement that they only step in when exceptional issues arise, such as interruption of benefits, doesn't seem to sit with the numbers of people they claim to help. They can't have great control on the distribution of vouchers. They just use that to claim they only help the most needy. But if they give job centres, doctors, teachers etc wads of vouchers then they are going to be handed out freely I would have thought?
It's all very well assuming. Its amazing too the amount of people commenting who seem to miraculously appear outside Food Banks & watch people they know coming & going.
[quote][p][bold]PokesdownMark[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wintonCheryl[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BournemouthMum[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]PokesdownMark[/bold] wrote: Several new food banks are set up every week in the UK, the are in vogue with a certain brand of Christian sect. I find it odd then that the larger food bank organisations churn out press releases about the numbers of people they serve because they themselves are creating the demand in the first place. I do not doubt that some small number of very needy people benefit. But the organisations press offices talk about hundreds of thousands leading to nonsense headlines about third world Britain. Do not be fooled by those jumping on this most ideological theocratic bandwagon as proof of their political agenda and bias.[/p][/quote]Well said. Your comment may prove unpopular but it's very true. Call me a cynic, but people are making money out of these charities.[/p][/quote]Try and find out how much the trussell trusts chris mould takes home a year in salary. It's like a secret society.[/p][/quote]Found this in a comment on a rather shaky piece on www.opendemocracy website: (for what that's worth?!) ----Over the last two years (2011-12) Mould and his wife have received over £150,000 in wages, salaries, emoluments, consultancy fees and rent payments from Trussell Trust. The rent payments go to Mould's wife who bills the Trust for office space she leases to it in Salisbury. Mould has also set up a private company, Chris Mould Limited, through which Trussell Trust has paid him more than £30,000 over the last two years, for "management consultancy" services.---- That actually seems quite reasonable to me. I think the foodbanks are ok. I just wish they, and the left-inclined would not deduce that their supply isn't creating the demand. And their statement that they only step in when exceptional issues arise, such as interruption of benefits, doesn't seem to sit with the numbers of people they claim to help. They can't have great control on the distribution of vouchers. They just use that to claim they only help the most needy. But if they give job centres, doctors, teachers etc wads of vouchers then they are going to be handed out freely I would have thought?[/p][/quote]It's all very well assuming. Its amazing too the amount of people commenting who seem to miraculously appear outside Food Banks & watch people they know coming & going. stevobath

11:13pm Mon 30 Dec 13

stevobath says...

fireflier wrote:
Loads of Government stories about people getting jobs and the fall in unemployment. Truth is peopel are scrounging around for a few hours here-or-there on part time or zero hours contracts jsut to bring in a few quid.

The expansion in jobs is a myth which this Coalition have you believe is the way to their new Britain. We are all in the sh1t together...or getting that way.
Yes all in it together. Bit like Animal Farm. All equal, but some more equal than others.
The hate frenzy the Right have stoked is typical of scapegoating.

The 1 million jobs created...Most Part Time & low paid. I can't wait for the interest rates to rise. See how many love this Government then.
[quote][p][bold]fireflier[/bold] wrote: Loads of Government stories about people getting jobs and the fall in unemployment. Truth is peopel are scrounging around for a few hours here-or-there on part time or zero hours contracts jsut to bring in a few quid. The expansion in jobs is a myth which this Coalition have you believe is the way to their new Britain. We are all in the sh1t together...or getting that way.[/p][/quote]Yes all in it together. Bit like Animal Farm. All equal, but some more equal than others. The hate frenzy the Right have stoked is typical of scapegoating. The 1 million jobs created...Most Part Time & low paid. I can't wait for the interest rates to rise. See how many love this Government then. stevobath

1:30am Tue 31 Dec 13

justsayithowitis says...

spooki wrote:
BournemouthMum wrote:
Those who fare worse in this country are single people - whether in work or unemployed. Those will kids will never suffer hardship as benefits are paid in abundance for producing children - i.e. child benefit, housing benefit and tax credits and the council has a duty to provide accommodation. I feel genuinely sorry for single unemployed people who get £70 a week to live on. This is supplosed to pay for their food, utilities, trips to the Jobcentre and phone callss to apply for jobs. If families with children are going without food when they are paid ample benefits for the children then all I can say is they must be misappropriating funds that are meant to be spent on their children.

Thumbs down my comment if you like - but it's true.
I don't think being a single parent means you get "abundant" benefits (I certainly don't but then I'm honest when I fill out forms), but I do agree that a lot of folk in my situation seem to have fancy contract phones, full Sky privileges, new games consoles (new PS4s as I've seen a few with) and other such things I would class as luxuries. Priorities as far as I'm concerned are food and clothes for my daughter, then stuff for me and some in savings. I very rarely even buy clothes for myself and I tend to only shop in cheap places as that's all I can afford.
I hope these food bank customers are genuine and not taking the supplies from someone who really needs it.
I wish I could afford to put some money in savings and I work full time
[quote][p][bold]spooki[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BournemouthMum[/bold] wrote: Those who fare worse in this country are single people - whether in work or unemployed. Those will kids will never suffer hardship as benefits are paid in abundance for producing children - i.e. child benefit, housing benefit and tax credits and the council has a duty to provide accommodation. I feel genuinely sorry for single unemployed people who get £70 a week to live on. This is supplosed to pay for their food, utilities, trips to the Jobcentre and phone callss to apply for jobs. If families with children are going without food when they are paid ample benefits for the children then all I can say is they must be misappropriating funds that are meant to be spent on their children. Thumbs down my comment if you like - but it's true.[/p][/quote]I don't think being a single parent means you get "abundant" benefits (I certainly don't but then I'm honest when I fill out forms), but I do agree that a lot of folk in my situation seem to have fancy contract phones, full Sky privileges, new games consoles (new PS4s as I've seen a few with) and other such things I would class as luxuries. Priorities as far as I'm concerned are food and clothes for my daughter, then stuff for me and some in savings. I very rarely even buy clothes for myself and I tend to only shop in cheap places as that's all I can afford. I hope these food bank customers are genuine and not taking the supplies from someone who really needs it.[/p][/quote]I wish I could afford to put some money in savings and I work full time justsayithowitis

9:32am Tue 31 Dec 13

wintonCheryl says...

Just looked on the trussell trusts website to see what you get for your £1500 if you want to set up a food bank.
A manual
On going support
Template website
Branding materials (leaflets and banners)
Online stock control system
Press release templates

To me that little lot shouldn't cost more than £100. So where does the rest go?? No wonder their vision is "to see a food bank in every UK town"
I bet it is!!!
Just looked on the trussell trusts website to see what you get for your £1500 if you want to set up a food bank. A manual On going support Template website Branding materials (leaflets and banners) Online stock control system Press release templates To me that little lot shouldn't cost more than £100. So where does the rest go?? No wonder their vision is "to see a food bank in every UK town" I bet it is!!! wintonCheryl

10:03am Tue 31 Dec 13

pete woodley says...

Keep commenting Cheryl,its time the public knew the truth,why does the trust get away with it,who do they know ?.How much rent is paid by the food bank and to whom ?.
Keep commenting Cheryl,its time the public knew the truth,why does the trust get away with it,who do they know ?.How much rent is paid by the food bank and to whom ?. pete woodley

10:31am Tue 31 Dec 13

Old Colonial says...

pete woodley wrote:
Keep commenting Cheryl,its time the public knew the truth,why does the trust get away with it,who do they know ?.How much rent is paid by the food bank and to whom ?.
Go on to the Charity Commission website, search for Trussell Trust, and download their full accounts.
[quote][p][bold]pete woodley[/bold] wrote: Keep commenting Cheryl,its time the public knew the truth,why does the trust get away with it,who do they know ?.How much rent is paid by the food bank and to whom ?.[/p][/quote]Go on to the Charity Commission website, search for Trussell Trust, and download their full accounts. Old Colonial

1:33pm Tue 31 Dec 13

Bournefre says...

stevobath wrote:
roxit78 wrote:
Back in the 80s my father was unemployed for 2 years, and tells me that he did not claim benefits, but actually worked self employed as a painter decorator to keep food on our table, and it was actually the first time we had an overseas holiday.

I did not have the best trainers at school (although today that would be an iPad and Diesel jeans) but it didn't do me any harm, since I grew up to appreciate the value of nice things and do have the iPad and Diesel jeans at my own expense.

I could really sympathise with those who are destitute but I would ask - what have they done to remedy themselves out of this situation? Why have we turned into a nation of expectants without any moral responsibility for our own actions or choices.

I'm pretty certain that most of the foodbank users will still smoke, still drink, still drive, and still have Sky TV. They will have iPhones, iPads etc.

It's about priorities and responsibility. Until people take responsibility for their own lives, I for one would never condone the use of these foodbanks, nor benefits as a whole.
So your' Dad Wasn't unemployed. He was working (fiddling?) on the side?
Unemployed means not working. Your' Father wasn't entitled to claim if he was painting & decorating IE EMPLOYED!

As for pontificating on food banks etc. Who made you moral arbiter & Judge & Jury?
That's what I was thinking - self employment is a form of employment, not unemployment. Most people in the construction industry work on a self-employed basis; not "fiddling" as you call it but employers don't want to have to find you work when they're quiet, as a result you sit at home earning nothing. Go into the Jobcentre and tell them you haven't got any work and they'll tell you you have got a job because you're self-employed so you should just pull your finger out and find work!
[quote][p][bold]stevobath[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]roxit78[/bold] wrote: Back in the 80s my father was unemployed for 2 years, and tells me that he did not claim benefits, but actually worked self employed as a painter decorator to keep food on our table, and it was actually the first time we had an overseas holiday. I did not have the best trainers at school (although today that would be an iPad and Diesel jeans) but it didn't do me any harm, since I grew up to appreciate the value of nice things and do have the iPad and Diesel jeans at my own expense. I could really sympathise with those who are destitute but I would ask - what have they done to remedy themselves out of this situation? Why have we turned into a nation of expectants without any moral responsibility for our own actions or choices. I'm pretty certain that most of the foodbank users will still smoke, still drink, still drive, and still have Sky TV. They will have iPhones, iPads etc. It's about priorities and responsibility. Until people take responsibility for their own lives, I for one would never condone the use of these foodbanks, nor benefits as a whole.[/p][/quote]So your' Dad Wasn't unemployed. He was working (fiddling?) on the side? Unemployed means not working. Your' Father wasn't entitled to claim if he was painting & decorating IE EMPLOYED! As for pontificating on food banks etc. Who made you moral arbiter & Judge & Jury?[/p][/quote]That's what I was thinking - self employment is a form of employment, not unemployment. Most people in the construction industry work on a self-employed basis; not "fiddling" as you call it but employers don't want to have to find you work when they're quiet, as a result you sit at home earning nothing. Go into the Jobcentre and tell them you haven't got any work and they'll tell you you have got a job because you're self-employed so you should just pull your finger out and find work! Bournefre

6:58pm Tue 31 Dec 13

Louise35 says...

People keep going on about the government, yep they're shady as hell and do not consider people on lower incomes. However this food bank issue is more to do with society of today. The benefit system IS enough to sustain a family, not in the lap of luxury, but comfortably.... If people just got their priorities right. Maybe the government need to provide better education, this is how you feed a family etc. Tell them that the latest smart phone is not a necessity, neither is a car or Sky movies. But it's not because of having a crap government that housed people on benefits are using food banks, it's because too many people want something for nothing!

Homelessness IS a government issue and there should be more support out there for people and this is what food banks are really for! Not for people on benefits who spend taxpayers money on cigarettes, alcohol, cars and gadgets, then go and get fed at a food bank... There should be more help for people with mental health issues (often a cause of homelessness) and addiction, so much red tape to get through, then often it's too late. Once they're on the streets it's so hard to get them back into the system, something has to change there.

Too many people taking advantage of a service, now people are looking in the wrong direction for change...and the people that really do need our help, the homeless, are getting more and more ignored.
People keep going on about the government, yep they're shady as hell and do not consider people on lower incomes. However this food bank issue is more to do with society of today. The benefit system IS enough to sustain a family, not in the lap of luxury, but comfortably.... If people just got their priorities right. Maybe the government need to provide better education, this is how you feed a family etc. Tell them that the latest smart phone is not a necessity, neither is a car or Sky movies. But it's not because of having a crap government that housed people on benefits are using food banks, it's because too many people want something for nothing! Homelessness IS a government issue and there should be more support out there for people and this is what food banks are really for! Not for people on benefits who spend taxpayers money on cigarettes, alcohol, cars and gadgets, then go and get fed at a food bank... There should be more help for people with mental health issues (often a cause of homelessness) and addiction, so much red tape to get through, then often it's too late. Once they're on the streets it's so hard to get them back into the system, something has to change there. Too many people taking advantage of a service, now people are looking in the wrong direction for change...and the people that really do need our help, the homeless, are getting more and more ignored. Louise35

7:03pm Tue 31 Dec 13

pete woodley says...

Louise35 wrote:
People keep going on about the government, yep they're shady as hell and do not consider people on lower incomes. However this food bank issue is more to do with society of today. The benefit system IS enough to sustain a family, not in the lap of luxury, but comfortably.... If people just got their priorities right. Maybe the government need to provide better education, this is how you feed a family etc. Tell them that the latest smart phone is not a necessity, neither is a car or Sky movies. But it's not because of having a crap government that housed people on benefits are using food banks, it's because too many people want something for nothing!

Homelessness IS a government issue and there should be more support out there for people and this is what food banks are really for! Not for people on benefits who spend taxpayers money on cigarettes, alcohol, cars and gadgets, then go and get fed at a food bank... There should be more help for people with mental health issues (often a cause of homelessness) and addiction, so much red tape to get through, then often it's too late. Once they're on the streets it's so hard to get them back into the system, something has to change there.

Too many people taking advantage of a service, now people are looking in the wrong direction for change...and the people that really do need our help, the homeless, are getting more and more ignored.
So very true.
[quote][p][bold]Louise35[/bold] wrote: People keep going on about the government, yep they're shady as hell and do not consider people on lower incomes. However this food bank issue is more to do with society of today. The benefit system IS enough to sustain a family, not in the lap of luxury, but comfortably.... If people just got their priorities right. Maybe the government need to provide better education, this is how you feed a family etc. Tell them that the latest smart phone is not a necessity, neither is a car or Sky movies. But it's not because of having a crap government that housed people on benefits are using food banks, it's because too many people want something for nothing! Homelessness IS a government issue and there should be more support out there for people and this is what food banks are really for! Not for people on benefits who spend taxpayers money on cigarettes, alcohol, cars and gadgets, then go and get fed at a food bank... There should be more help for people with mental health issues (often a cause of homelessness) and addiction, so much red tape to get through, then often it's too late. Once they're on the streets it's so hard to get them back into the system, something has to change there. Too many people taking advantage of a service, now people are looking in the wrong direction for change...and the people that really do need our help, the homeless, are getting more and more ignored.[/p][/quote]So very true. pete woodley

8:15pm Tue 31 Dec 13

tim m says...

Moro99 wrote:
And in other news childhood obesity is up in Bournemouth
Not surprising - obesity is a common result of poor diet.
[quote][p][bold]Moro99[/bold] wrote: And in other news childhood obesity is up in Bournemouth[/p][/quote]Not surprising - obesity is a common result of poor diet. tim m

2:12am Wed 1 Jan 14

justsayithowitis says...

tim m wrote:
Moro99 wrote:
And in other news childhood obesity is up in Bournemouth
Not surprising - obesity is a common result of poor diet.
Poor diet is down to parents choices not how much money we give them every week. I can't see how there are any families in this country who can't afford food. As has been mentioned homeless people do need help and that needs sorting out now.
[quote][p][bold]tim m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Moro99[/bold] wrote: And in other news childhood obesity is up in Bournemouth[/p][/quote]Not surprising - obesity is a common result of poor diet.[/p][/quote]Poor diet is down to parents choices not how much money we give them every week. I can't see how there are any families in this country who can't afford food. As has been mentioned homeless people do need help and that needs sorting out now. justsayithowitis

9:23am Wed 1 Jan 14

Phixer says...

arthur1948 wrote:
Welcome to caring Britain under the Tories .....rob the poor and give to the rich.
Typical to blame a government for the 'failings' of individuals. Anyone who has been east of Cyprus will realise that the happiest people are those without any social safety net, ie., those who have family to support and supporting them.

We now live in a 'civilised society' where everything is the fault of others; no-one takes responsibilty for their own actions or inactions. Generations ago parents would teach their children to cook and be thrifty. The children learnt from how their parents dealt with hard times. Now the feckless expect to tax my pension to pay for their TV subscriptions, etc., while leading a warm, dry life on the sofa all day.

Do these 'third world' families offer to help the food banks, charities or society to offset the cost of their running? No of course not - someone else can/will pay for their sloth.
[quote][p][bold]arthur1948[/bold] wrote: Welcome to caring Britain under the Tories .....rob the poor and give to the rich.[/p][/quote]Typical to blame a government for the 'failings' of individuals. Anyone who has been east of Cyprus will realise that the happiest people are those without any social safety net, ie., those who have family to support and supporting them. We now live in a 'civilised society' where everything is the fault of others; no-one takes responsibilty for their own actions or inactions. Generations ago parents would teach their children to cook and be thrifty. The children learnt from how their parents dealt with hard times. Now the feckless expect to tax my pension to pay for their TV subscriptions, etc., while leading a warm, dry life on the sofa all day. Do these 'third world' families offer to help the food banks, charities or society to offset the cost of their running? No of course not - someone else can/will pay for their sloth. Phixer

12:01pm Wed 1 Jan 14

Louise35 says...

Obesity in poverty is often the result of poor education.... Healthy food, fresh fruit and veg are far cheaper than frozen pizza and chips. I don't eat meat so have no idea about the cost, but I know people that go to the Supermarkets later in the day when prices are significantly reduced.
Obesity in poverty is often the result of poor education.... Healthy food, fresh fruit and veg are far cheaper than frozen pizza and chips. I don't eat meat so have no idea about the cost, but I know people that go to the Supermarkets later in the day when prices are significantly reduced. Louise35

2:06pm Wed 1 Jan 14

elfinia says...

portia6 wrote:
You never know how your life will turn out and sometimes its not your fault.
Greed and immorality has taken over. The Red Cross have always been
there if there is a crisis. Let's hope the needy families get the help they
deserve.
The Red Cross CEO ( a retired lawyer , I think) just got a pay rise and earns
£180 000 a year. The Red Cross shop managers ( who do a great job IMO) take home around £13 500 ( ?) a year for a full time job. The volunteers receive training and , if they are lucky, a £7.50 for a meal at Christmas.

I actually think that The Red Cross should run more like a business as somebody on this thread suggested..
[quote][p][bold]portia6[/bold] wrote: You never know how your life will turn out and sometimes its not your fault. Greed and immorality has taken over. The Red Cross have always been there if there is a crisis. Let's hope the needy families get the help they deserve.[/p][/quote]The Red Cross CEO ( a retired lawyer , I think) just got a pay rise and earns £180 000 a year. The Red Cross shop managers ( who do a great job IMO) take home around £13 500 ( ?) a year for a full time job. The volunteers receive training and , if they are lucky, a £7.50 for a meal at Christmas. I actually think that The Red Cross should run more like a business as somebody on this thread suggested.. elfinia

3:56pm Wed 1 Jan 14

pete woodley says...

Another example of where charity money is going,its a disgrace,and theres more like them.
Another example of where charity money is going,its a disgrace,and theres more like them. pete woodley

9:31am Thu 2 Jan 14

Dorset Logic says...

pauls55 wrote:
Why do some of the people here assume everyone in need of foodbanks have sky dishes and drink and smoke! Have you ever visited one? You have no evidence whatsoever apart from your own blinkered prejudice and believing the distored rubbish splashed across right wing rags like the Mail and Sun. The fact is we live in a low wage economy deliberately constructed by this vile governement to make sure only the priviledged few can flourish.
caveat.
unless you decide to do something about it.
[quote][p][bold]pauls55[/bold] wrote: Why do some of the people here assume everyone in need of foodbanks have sky dishes and drink and smoke! Have you ever visited one? You have no evidence whatsoever apart from your own blinkered prejudice and believing the distored rubbish splashed across right wing rags like the Mail and Sun. The fact is we live in a low wage economy deliberately constructed by this vile governement to make sure only the priviledged few can flourish.[/p][/quote]caveat. unless you decide to do something about it. Dorset Logic

9:36am Thu 2 Jan 14

Dorset Logic says...

stevobath wrote:
Dorset Logic wrote:
arthur1948 wrote:
Welcome to caring Britain under the Tories .....rob the poor and give to the rich.
I seem to remember these food banks existing for quite a while now - including under labour, but don't let the facts worry you. Politicians of any party are not going to save anyone.
Yes they existed. Have done for years. However it's no surprise those using them have gone up from around 60,000 under Labour to over 360,000 now. These are official figures. Also there are many other smaller charities providing the same kind of help who never get a mention. The real figures are probably higher.
The scum that walked out during the Foodbank Debate are disgusting. They haven't a decent humane bone in their selfish Selservative bodies.
60,000 is too many. As I said - pitting Tory against Labour is the biggest yawn fest argument there is. Like Harry Enfields Tory Boy sketches.

Neither one is worth a ****, and people coming on here and saying Tory did this or Labour did that is bull crap.
[quote][p][bold]stevobath[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dorset Logic[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]arthur1948[/bold] wrote: Welcome to caring Britain under the Tories .....rob the poor and give to the rich.[/p][/quote]I seem to remember these food banks existing for quite a while now - including under labour, but don't let the facts worry you. Politicians of any party are not going to save anyone.[/p][/quote]Yes they existed. Have done for years. However it's no surprise those using them have gone up from around 60,000 under Labour to over 360,000 now. These are official figures. Also there are many other smaller charities providing the same kind of help who never get a mention. The real figures are probably higher. The scum that walked out during the Foodbank Debate are disgusting. They haven't a decent humane bone in their selfish Selservative bodies.[/p][/quote]60,000 is too many. As I said - pitting Tory against Labour is the biggest yawn fest argument there is. Like Harry Enfields Tory Boy sketches. Neither one is worth a ****, and people coming on here and saying Tory did this or Labour did that is bull crap. Dorset Logic

12:36pm Thu 2 Jan 14

ian_the_bute says...

HRH of Boscombe wrote:
ian_the_bute wrote:
and in other news
millionaires now receive an extra £7500 net a month due to top rate of tax being abolished. Vile ,disgraceful ,and its what YOU voted for
People shouldn't have families they can't afford.
.
I expect more are abusing the system anyway to get a freebie.
.
The top rate of tax is not for millionaires. It's abusing people who have worked hard and get paid well.
.
How do you think it was right to take half of someone's earnings just because they earn more than you?
The more you earn the more you should pay tax .it is banded up to £150,000 a year why not carry on with another banding. i think it is right to take half of any earnings ABOVE £150,000 because they can very very easily afford it and its called social justice ,caring for the less fortunate and needy. people cheating the system and impersonating the less fortunate and needy is equally unfair. I used to earn above £100,000 and paid the top rate of tax happily but then I'm not a greedy little englander
[quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ian_the_bute[/bold] wrote: and in other news millionaires now receive an extra £7500 net a month due to top rate of tax being abolished. Vile ,disgraceful ,and its what YOU voted for[/p][/quote]People shouldn't have families they can't afford. . I expect more are abusing the system anyway to get a freebie. . The top rate of tax is not for millionaires. It's abusing people who have worked hard and get paid well. . How do you think it was right to take half of someone's earnings just because they earn more than you?[/p][/quote]The more you earn the more you should pay tax .it is banded up to £150,000 a year why not carry on with another banding. i think it is right to take half of any earnings ABOVE £150,000 because they can very very easily afford it and its called social justice ,caring for the less fortunate and needy. people cheating the system and impersonating the less fortunate and needy is equally unfair. I used to earn above £100,000 and paid the top rate of tax happily but then I'm not a greedy little englander ian_the_bute

4:52pm Thu 2 Jan 14

harryonthecoast says...

No such thing as poverty in Britain today.Compared to the 30s and 40s this generation don't know they are born.
No such thing as poverty in Britain today.Compared to the 30s and 40s this generation don't know they are born. harryonthecoast

9:34pm Thu 2 Jan 14

O'Reilly says...

Story about food bank with a not so subtle advert for the Lord Bute - half way down - with nice photos of posh nosh.....cheeky!!!
Story about food bank with a not so subtle advert for the Lord Bute - half way down - with nice photos of posh nosh.....cheeky!!! O'Reilly

11:19pm Thu 2 Jan 14

Just_Sayin' says...

susi.m wrote:
I know of someone who attends a food bank but they have more disposable income than I do and I work full time.
They have 2 x takeaways a week, Sky TV, Ipad, I phone, X-box.
They have a mobility car but can walk just as well as me.
Should I report them to someone? or should I just go to the food bank myself?
You'd probably be turned away because you actually work for a living. A bit like the PDSA really. "We're on benefits and can't really 'afford' to care for these pets but luckily some genius invented a free pet care service where payment is taken in the from of a wave of a benefit form." Makes me sick.
[quote][p][bold]susi.m[/bold] wrote: I know of someone who attends a food bank but they have more disposable income than I do and I work full time. They have 2 x takeaways a week, Sky TV, Ipad, I phone, X-box. They have a mobility car but can walk just as well as me. Should I report them to someone? or should I just go to the food bank myself?[/p][/quote]You'd probably be turned away because you actually work for a living. A bit like the PDSA really. "We're on benefits and can't really 'afford' to care for these pets but luckily some genius invented a free pet care service where payment is taken in the from of a wave of a benefit form." Makes me sick. Just_Sayin'

10:20am Fri 3 Jan 14

live-and-let-live says...

third world??? starvation???? huh???? go for a stroll along any high street and see how many thin gaunt people there are. ive done exactly that one day and i saw mostly obese people.
third world??? starvation???? huh???? go for a stroll along any high street and see how many thin gaunt people there are. ive done exactly that one day and i saw mostly obese people. live-and-let-live

11:10am Sat 4 Jan 14

alasdair1967 says...

Makes me furious reading stories like this ,genuine families struggling working trying to make ends meet having to resort to using food banks then you read about the spongers living the life of Riley on the benefit system
Makes me furious reading stories like this ,genuine families struggling working trying to make ends meet having to resort to using food banks then you read about the spongers living the life of Riley on the benefit system alasdair1967

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